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Definitions of swing

  1. in baseball; a batter's attempt to hit a pitched ball; "he took a vicious cut at the ball" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. hang freely; "the ornaments dangled from the tree"; "The light dropped from the ceiling" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. be a social swinger; socialize a lot Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. the act of swinging a golf club at a golf ball and (usually) hitting it Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a style of jazz played by big bands popular in the 1930s; flowing rhythms but less complex than later styles of jazz Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a jaunty rhythm in music Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. move or walk in a swinging or swaying manner; "He swung back" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. have a certain musical rhythm; "The music has to swing" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. changing location by moving back and forth Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a square dance figure; a pair of dancers join hands and dance around a point between them Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a sweeping blow or stroke; "he took a wild swing at my head" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. mechanical device used as a plaything to support someone swinging back and forth Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. a state of steady vigorous action that is characteristic of an activity; "the party went with a swing"; "it took time to get into the swing of things" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. hit or aim at with a sweeping arm movement; "The soccer player began to swing at the referee" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. make a big sweeping gesture or movement Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. influence decisively; "This action swung many votes over to his side" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. alternate dramatically between high and low values; "his mood swings"; "the market is swinging up and down" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. engage freely in promiscuous sex, often with the husband or wife of one's friends; "There were many swinging couples in the 1960's" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. play with a subtle and intuitively felt sense of rhythm Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. change direction with a swinging motion; turn; "swing back"; "swing forward" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. move in a curve or arc, usually with the intent of hitting; "He swung his left fist"; "swing a bat" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  22. live in a lively, modern, and relaxed style; "The Woodstock generation attempted to swing freely" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  23. To move to and fro, as a body suspended in the air; to wave; to vibrate; to oscillate. Newage Dictionary DB
  24. To sway or move from one side or direction to another; as, the door swung open. Newage Dictionary DB
  25. To use a swing; as, a boy swings for exercise or pleasure. See Swing, n., 3. Newage Dictionary DB
  26. To turn round by action of wind or tide when at anchor; as, a ship swings with the tide. Newage Dictionary DB
  27. To be hanged. Newage Dictionary DB
  28. To cause to swing or vibrate; to cause to move backward and forward, or from one side to the other. Newage Dictionary DB
  29. To give a circular movement to; to whirl; to brandish; as, to swing a sword; to swing a club; hence, colloquially, to manage; as, to swing a business. Newage Dictionary DB
  30. To admit or turn (anything) for the purpose of shaping it; -- said of a lathe; as, the lathe can swing a pulley of 12 inches diameter. Newage Dictionary DB
  31. The act of swinging; a waving, oscillating, or vibratory motion of a hanging or pivoted object; oscillation; as, the swing of a pendulum. Newage Dictionary DB
  32. Swaying motion from one side or direction to the other; as, some men walk with a swing. Newage Dictionary DB
  33. A line, cord, or other thing suspended and hanging loose, upon which anything may swing; especially, an apparatus for recreation by swinging, commonly consisting of a rope, the two ends of which are attached overhead, as to the bough of a tree, a seat being placed in the loop at the bottom; also, any contrivance by which a similar motion is produced for amusement or exercise. Newage Dictionary DB
  34. Influence of power of a body put in swaying motion. Newage Dictionary DB
  35. Capacity of a turning lathe, as determined by the diameter of the largest object that can be turned in it. Newage Dictionary DB
  36. Free course; unrestrained liberty or license; tendency. Newage Dictionary DB
  37. To move to and fro while hanging, as the pendulum of a clock; to turn on, or as on, a hinge, or axis; as, the gate swings open; to go along with a loose, free, swaying gait; as, the soldiers swung around the corner; to use a swing. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  38. To cause to move to and fro; brandish; as, to swing a cane; cause to turn or wheel about; as, to swing a ship about; put up so as to hang freely; as, to swing a hammock. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  39. The act of swinging; swaying motion from side to side; distance through which an object swings; loose, free gait; an apparatus, usually a rope bearing a seat, for swinging to and fro; full course or freedom; as, to give full swing to imagination. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  40. Swung. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  41. Swinging. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  42. To sway or wave to and fro, as a body hanging in air: to vibrate: to practice swinging: to turn round at anchor: to be hanged. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  43. To move to and fro: to cause to wave or vibrate: to whirl, to brandish:-pa.t. and pa.p. swung. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  44. The act of swinging: motion to and fro: a waving motion: anything suspended for swinging in: the sweep or compass of a swinging body: power of anything swinging: free course. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  45. Act of swinging; motion to and fro; sweep of a swinging body; apparatus for swinging; free course. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  46. To cause to swing; whirl; brandish. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  47. To sway to and fro, as a body hanging free; to vibrate; move or float. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  48. To move to and fro while suspended; move or wave rhythmically. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  49. To turn, as on a pivot; wheel; turn about. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  50. The action of swinging. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  51. A free swaying motion. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  52. A contrivance with a seat, on which a person may swing as a pastime. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  53. Free course; compass; sweep. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  54. A waving or vibratory motion; oscillation; motion from one side to the other; a rope or other thing suspended to swing on; influence of a body in motion; unrestrained liberty or license; the sweep of a moving body. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  55. To make to play loosely; to cause to wave or vibrate; to move to and fro; to brandish. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  56. To move to and fro, as a body suspended in the air with unrestrained tendency to vibrate; to practise swinging; to turn round an anchor, as a ship; to be hanged. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  57. To cause to wave or vibrate; to wave loosely; to whirl round; to move to and fro; to change position at anchor, as a ship at each turn of the tide; in low language, to be hanged. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  58. Motion from one side to the other; a waving motion; an apparatus to swing in or from; unrestrained liberty or licence; the sweep of a moving body. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  59. Java's graphical user interface (GUI)package that provides a large collection of widgets(buttons, labels, lists etc.) that behave similarly ondifferent platforms. Swing features "pluggable look &feel", allowing the program to look like a Windows, Motifor Macintosh) application. It is implemented using theModel View Controller (MVC) architecture and makes extensiveuse of nested "containers" to control the handling of eventssuch as keystrokes. (http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.3/docs/api/javax/swing/package-summary.html). foldoc_fs
  60. To admit or turn (anything) for the purpose of shaping it; said of a lathe; as, the lathe can swing a pulley of 12 inches diameter. dictgcide_fs
  61. swing, v.i. to sway or wave to and fro, as a body hanging in air: to move forward with swaying gait: to vibrate: to practise swinging: to turn round at anchor: to be hanged.--v.t. to move to and fro: to cause to wave or vibrate: to whirl, to brandish: to cause to wheel or turn as about some point: to fix up anything so as to hang freely:--pa.t. and pa.p. swung.--n. the act of swinging: motion to and fro: a waving motion: anything suspended for swinging in: the sweep or compass of a swinging body: the sweep of a golf-club when driving: influence or power of anything put in motion: free course, unrestrained liberty.--ns. SWING'-BACK, a device for adjusting the plate-holder of a camera at any desired angle; SWING'BOAT, a boat-shaped carriage swung from a frame, in use for swinging in at fairs, &c.; SWING'-BRIDGE, a bridge that may be moved aside by swinging, at the mouth of docks, &c.; SWING'-CHURN, a churn-box so hung as to be worked by oscillation; SWING'ER; SWING'-HAN'DLE, a pivoted handle of any utensil, esp. a bail or other arched handle; SWING'ING, the act of moving back and forth, esp. the pastime of moving in a swing.--adj. having a free easy motion.--n. SWING'ING-BOOM, the spar which stretches the foot of a lower studding-sail.--adv. SWING'INGLY, in a swinging-manner.--ns. SWING'ING-POST, the post to which a gate is hung; SWING'ISM, a form of intimidation common in England about 1830-33, which consisted mainly in sending letters signed 'Swing' or 'Captain Swing' to farmers, ordering them under threats to give up threshing-machines, &c.; SWING'-M[=O]'TION, a mechanism in the truck of a railway carriage, &c., permitting swaying from side to side; SWING'-PAN, a sugar-pan with spout, pivoted so that it may be emptied by tipping; SWING'-PLOUGH, a plough without a fore-wheel under the beam; SWING'-SHELF, a hanging shelf; SWING'-STOCK, an upright timber, with a blunt edge at top over which flax was beaten by the swingle--also SWING'ING-BLOCK; SWING'-SWANG, a complete oscillation.--adj. swinging, drawling.--ns. SWING'-T[=A]'BLE, a moveable bed on which plate-glass is cemented for polishing; SWING'-TOOL, a holder swinging on horizontal centres, on which work is fastened so as to hold flat against the face of a file; SWING'-TREE=Swingle-tree (q.v.); SWING'-TROT, a swinging trot; SWING'-WHEEL, the wheel that drives a clock pendulum, corresponding to the balance-wheel in a watch. [A.S. swingan; Ger. schwingen, to swing; allied to wag, sway.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  62. (swung or rarely swang, swung), & n. Move (t. & i.) with to-&-fro or curving motion of object having fixed point (s) or side but otherwise free, sway (t. & i.) or so hang (t. & i.) as to be free to sway like a pendulum or door or branch or tree or hammock or anchored ship, oscillate, revolve, rock, wheel, (he shall s. for it, be hanged; door swung to, closed; boat, boom, swings round, across; ship swings at anchor; s. child &c., work the s. in which he sits; sat on table swinging his legs; s. one\'s arms, a bell, Indian clubs, bat, basket; s. a hammock, suspend it by ends; no room to s. a CAT; officer swings his company, company swings, into line, brings, comes, by wheeling); (part., of gait, melody, &c.) vigorously rhythmical (at a long swinging trot; a swinging chorus); go with swinging gait (he swung out of the room; s. along, past, by, &c.), whence swingingly adv. (N.) act of swinging, oscillation, swinging movement, (work is in full s., active; the s. of the pendulum fig., tendency to alternation, esp. tendency of electorate to put parties in power alternately); swinging gait or rhythm (goes with a s.); normal duration of activity (let it have its s., have free course till it rests of itself like pendulum); seat slung by ropes or chains for swinging in, spell of swinging in this; compass to which thing swings (has a s. of 3ft); s.-boat, boat-shaped carriage hung from frame for swinging in; s.-bridge, that can be swung aside as a whole or in sections to let ships &c. pass; s.-plough, without wheels. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  63. n. Act of swinging ; vibratory motion; oscillation ;-motion from one side to the other;-a line, cord, or other thing suspended and hanging loose, upon which any thing may swing;-influence or power of a body put in motion ;-free course ;-unrestrained liberty or license. Cabinet Dictionary

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