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Definitions of swing

  1. To move to and fro, as a body suspended in the air with unrestrained tendency to vibrate; to practise swinging; to turn round an anchor, as a ship; to be hanged. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To move to and fro while suspended; move or wave rhythmically. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To turn, as on a pivot; wheel; turn about. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  4. To cause to move to and fro; brandish; as, to swing a cane; cause to turn or wheel about; as, to swing a ship about; put up so as to hang freely; as, to swing a hammock. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  5. To move to and fro: to cause to wave or vibrate: to whirl, to brandish:-pa.t. and pa.p. swung. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  6. To cause to swing; whirl; brandish. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  7. To move to and fro while hanging, as the pendulum of a clock; to turn on, or as on, a hinge, or axis; as, the gate swings open; to go along with a loose, free, swaying gait; as, the soldiers swung around the corner; to use a swing. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. To sway or wave to and fro, as a body hanging in air: to vibrate: to practice swinging: to turn round at anchor: to be hanged. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  9. To sway to and fro, as a body hanging free; to vibrate; move or float. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  10. hang freely; "the ornaments dangled from the tree"; "The light dropped from the ceiling" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. be a social swinger; socialize a lot Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. move or walk in a swinging or swaying manner; "He swung back" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. have a certain musical rhythm; "The music has to swing" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. hit or aim at with a sweeping arm movement; "The soccer player began to swing at the referee" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. influence decisively; "This action swung many votes over to his side" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. alternate dramatically between high and low values; "his mood swings"; "the market is swinging up and down" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. engage freely in promiscuous sex, often with the husband or wife of one's friends; "There were many swinging couples in the 1960's" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. play with a subtle and intuitively felt sense of rhythm Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. change direction with a swinging motion; turn; "swing back"; "swing forward" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. move in a curve or arc, usually with the intent of hitting; "He swung his left fist"; "swing a bat" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. To move to and fro, as a body suspended in the air; to wave; to vibrate; to oscillate. Newage Dictionary DB
  22. To sway or move from one side or direction to another; as, the door swung open. Newage Dictionary DB
  23. To use a swing; as, a boy swings for exercise or pleasure. See Swing, n., 3. Newage Dictionary DB
  24. To turn round by action of wind or tide when at anchor; as, a ship swings with the tide. Newage Dictionary DB
  25. To be hanged. Newage Dictionary DB
  26. To cause to swing or vibrate; to cause to move backward and forward, or from one side to the other. Newage Dictionary DB
  27. To give a circular movement to; to whirl; to brandish; as, to swing a sword; to swing a club; hence, colloquially, to manage; as, to swing a business. Newage Dictionary DB
  28. To admit or turn (anything) for the purpose of shaping it; -- said of a lathe; as, the lathe can swing a pulley of 12 inches diameter. Newage Dictionary DB
  29. The act of swinging; a waving, oscillating, or vibratory motion of a hanging or pivoted object; oscillation; as, the swing of a pendulum. Newage Dictionary DB
  30. Swaying motion from one side or direction to the other; as, some men walk with a swing. Newage Dictionary DB
  31. A line, cord, or other thing suspended and hanging loose, upon which anything may swing; especially, an apparatus for recreation by swinging, commonly consisting of a rope, the two ends of which are attached overhead, as to the bough of a tree, a seat being placed in the loop at the bottom; also, any contrivance by which a similar motion is produced for amusement or exercise. Newage Dictionary DB
  32. Influence of power of a body put in swaying motion. Newage Dictionary DB
  33. Capacity of a turning lathe, as determined by the diameter of the largest object that can be turned in it. Newage Dictionary DB
  34. Free course; unrestrained liberty or license; tendency. Newage Dictionary DB
  35. To make to play loosely; to cause to wave or vibrate; to move to and fro; to brandish. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  36. To cause to wave or vibrate; to wave loosely; to whirl round; to move to and fro; to change position at anchor, as a ship at each turn of the tide; in low language, to be hanged. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  37. in baseball; a batter's attempt to hit a pitched ball; "he took a vicious cut at the ball" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  38. changing location by moving back and forth Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  39. a square dance figure; a pair of dancers join hands and dance around a point between them Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  40. a sweeping blow or stroke; "he took a wild swing at my head" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  41. mechanical device used as a plaything to support someone swinging back and forth Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  42. a state of steady vigorous action that is characteristic of an activity; "the party went with a swing"; "it took time to get into the swing of things" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  43. The act of swinging; swaying motion from side to side; distance through which an object swings; loose, free gait; an apparatus, usually a rope bearing a seat, for swinging to and fro; full course or freedom; as, to give full swing to imagination. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  44. The act of swinging: motion to and fro: a waving motion: anything suspended for swinging in: the sweep or compass of a swinging body: power of anything swinging: free course. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  45. Act of swinging; motion to and fro; sweep of a swinging body; apparatus for swinging; free course. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  46. The action of swinging. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. A free swaying motion. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. A contrivance with a seat, on which a person may swing as a pastime. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  49. Free course; compass; sweep. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  50. A waving or vibratory motion; oscillation; motion from one side to the other; a rope or other thing suspended to swing on; influence of a body in motion; unrestrained liberty or license; the sweep of a moving body. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  51. Motion from one side to the other; a waving motion; an apparatus to swing in or from; unrestrained liberty or licence; the sweep of a moving body. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  52. Swinging. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  53. Swung. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

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Usage examples for swing

  1. But once things got into swing she had no further trouble except with poor, awkward, shy Georgiana. – The Motor Maids by Palm and Pine by Katherine Stokes
  2. The swing made even a prettier picture than the house. – Mary Erskine by Jacob Abbott
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