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Definitions of sympathy

  1. sharing the feelings of others (especially feelings of sorrow or anguish) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a relation of affinity or harmony between people; whatever affects one correspondingly affects the other; "the two of them were in close sympathy" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. an inclination to support or be loyal to or to agree with an opinion; "his sympathies were always with the underdog"; "I knew I could count on his understanding" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. The reciprocal influence exercised by organs or parts on one another, as shown in the effects of a diseased condition of one part on another part or organ, as in the vomiting produced by a tumor of the brain. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. The influence of a certain psychological state in one person in producing a like state in another. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Feeling corresponding to that which another feels; the quality of being affected by the affection of another, with feelings correspondent in kind, if not in degree; fellow-feeling. Newage Dictionary DB
  7. An agreement of affections or inclinations, or a conformity of natural temperament, which causes persons to be pleased, or in accord, with one another; as, there is perfect sympathy between them. Newage Dictionary DB
  8. Kindness of feeling toward one who suffers; pity; commiseration; compassion. Newage Dictionary DB
  9. The reciprocal influence exercised by the various organs or parts of the body on one another, as manifested in the transmission of a disease by unknown means from one organ to another quite remote, or in the influence exerted by a diseased condition of one part on another part or organ, as in the vomiting produced by a tumor of the brain. Newage Dictionary DB
  10. That relation which exists between different persons by which one of them produces in the others a state or condition like that of himself. This is shown in the tendency to yawn which a person often feels on seeing another yawn, or the strong inclination to become hysteric experienced by many women on seeing another person suffering with hysteria. Newage Dictionary DB
  11. A tendency of inanimate things to unite, or to act on each other; as, the sympathy between the loadstone and iron. Newage Dictionary DB
  12. Similarity of function, use office, or the like. Newage Dictionary DB
  13. A feeling like that which another feels; harmony or agreement of affections or tastes. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. 1. The mutual relation, physiological or pathological, between two organs, systems, or parts of the body. 2. Mental contagion, as seen in the spread of chorea or other nervous disease through a school, the yawning induced by seeing another person yawn, etc. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  15. Applied to condition where an uninjured part is affected by one that is injured, as losing sight of one eye due to injury of the other eye. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  16. Feeling with another: like feeling: an agreement of inclination, feeling, or sensation: compassion: pity: tenderness. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. Feeling with another; agreement of feeling; pity; compassion; capacity of being affected by the condition of another. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  18. Feeling correspondent to that of another; fellow-feeling: followed by with. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  19. Pity; commiseration: followed by for. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  20. Congeniality; accord; affinity. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  21. Fellow-feeling; the quality of being affected by the affection of another with correspondent feelings; compassion; an agreement of affections or inclinations; a correspondence of various parts of the body in similar sensations or affections; a propension of inanimate things to unite, or to act on each other. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  22. sim'pa-thi, n. like feeling: an agreement of inclination, feeling, or sensation: compassion: pity: tenderness: an agreement of affections or inclinations, or a conformity of natural temperament: mutual conformity of parts in the fine arts: correspondence of parts in similar sensations or affections, or the affection of the whole body or system, or some part of it, in consequence of local injury or disease: propensity of inanimate bodies to union or mutual action: the effective union of colours.--adjs. SYMPATHET'IC, -AL, showing, or inclined to, sympathy: feeling with another: able to sympathise: compassionate: produced by sympathy: uniting viscera and blood-vessels in a nervous action common to them all: noting sounds induced by vibrations conveyed through air, &c., from a body already in vibration.--adv. SYMPATHET'ICALLY.--n. SYMPATHET'ICISM, undue disipostion to be sympathetic.--v.i. SYM'PATHISE, to have sympathy: to feel with or for another: to be compassionate.--ns. SYM'PATHISER; SYM'PATHISM; SYM'PATHIST.--SYMPATHETIC INK (see INK). [Gr. sympatheia--syn, with, pathos, suffering.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  23. [Greek] A relation (usually reciprocal) between two persons or parts, by which an alteration of affection of one produces a corresponding alteration or affection of another. S. may exist (A) between two different individuals, causing one to be affected by another’s state and thrown into a similar condition, either from mere force of example and suggestion (as in the transmission of hysterical and other mental states by imitation, and in the phenomena of hypnotism), or by some obscure influence operating at a distance and causing one person to be affected by the state of another whom he does not see (Telepathy; see also Thought-transfer). S. also exists (B) between body and mind, causing either to be affected by the state of the other. The third form of s. (C) is that exiting between different organs, especially two members of a pair, and causing a disturbance in one to be reflected upon the other. See Reflex action. na
  24. Being simultaneously affected with the same feeling, tendency to share or state of sharing another person\'s or thing\'s emotion or sensation or condition (with), mental participation in another\'s trouble (with), compassion (for), agreement in opinion or desire. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  25. That relation of different parts of the system in virtue of which one part becomes diseased or disordered in consequence of disease or disorder existing in some other part, not because of actual extension of the morbid process by continuity of structure. [Gr.] Appleton's medical dictionary.
  26. n. [Greek] Feeling correspondingly to that which another feels; fellow feeling; -an agreement of affections or inclinations, or a conformity of natural temperament, which, makes two persons pleased with each other ;-pity; commiseration;-in medicine, reciprocal influence exercised by the various parts of the body on one another in affections or disorders of the system;-in natural history, a propension of one body or substance to unite with or act on another; affinity;-in the fine arts, conformity of parts one to the other; - in painting, effective union of colours. Cabinet Dictionary

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