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Definitions of take

  1. be designed to hold or take; "This surface will not take the dye" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. make use of or accept for some purpose; "take a risk"; "take an opportunity" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. receive willingly something given or offered; "The only girl who would have him was the miller's daughter"; "I won't have this dog in my house!"; "Please accept my present" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. admit into a group or community; "accept students for graduate study"; "We'll have to vote on whether or not to admit a new member" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. take on a certain form, attribute, or aspect; "His voice took on a sad tone"; "The story took a new turn"; "he adopted an air of superiority"; "She assumed strange manners"; "The gods assume human or animal form in these fables" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. aim or direct at; as of blows, weapons, or objects such as photographic equipment; "Please don't aim at your little brother!"; "He trained his gun on the burglar"; "Don't train your camera on the women"; "Take a swipe at one's opponent" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. require as useful, just, or proper; "It takes nerve to do what she did"; "success usually requires hard work"; "This job asks a lot of patience and skill"; "This position demands a lot of personal sacrifice"; "This dinner calls for a spectacular dessert"; "This intervention does not postulates a patient's consent" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. take something or somebody with oneself somewhere; "Bring me the box from the other room"; "Take these letters to the boss"; "This brings me to the main point" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. engage for service under a term of contract; "We took an apartment on a quiet street"; "Let's rent a car"; "Shall we take a guide in Rome?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. pick out, select, or choose from a number of alternatives; "Take any one of these cards"; "Choose a good husband for your daughter"; "She selected a pair of shoes from among the dozen the salesgirl had shown her" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. take as an undesirable consequence of some event or state of affairs; "the accident claimed three lives"; "The hard work took its toll on her" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. lay claim to; as of an idea; "She took credit for the whole idea" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. take somebody somewhere; "We lead him to our chief"; "can you take me to the main entrance?"; "He conducted us to the palace" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. consider, as of an example; "Take the case of China"; "Consider the following case" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. serve oneself to, or consume regularly; "Have another bowl of chicken soup!"; "I don't take sugar in my coffee" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. be capable of holding or containing; "This box won't take all the items"; "The flask holds one gallon" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. be stricken by an illness, fall victim to an illness; "He got AIDS"; "She came down with pneumonia"; "She took a chill" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. assume, as of positions or roles; "She took the job as director of development" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. make a film or photograph of something; "take a scene"; "shoot a movie" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. get into one's hands, take physically; "Take a cookie!"; "Can you take this bag, please" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. have sex with; archaic use; "He had taken this woman when she was most vulnerable" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. be a student of a certain subject; "She is reading for the bar exam" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. as of time or space; "It took three hours to get to work this morning"; "This event occupied a very short time" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  24. have with oneself; have on one's person; "She always takes an umbrella"; "I always carry money"; "She packs a gun when she goes into the mountains" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  25. the income arising from land or other property; "the average return was about 5%" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  26. interpret something in a certain way; convey a particular meaning or impression; "I read this address as a satire"; "How should I take this message?"; "You can't take credit for this!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  27. remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, taking off, etc.; or remove something abstract; "remove a threat"; "remove a wrapper"; "Remove the dirty dishes from the table"; "take the gun from your pocket"; "This machine withdraws heat from the environment" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  28. accept or undergo, often unwillingly; "We took a pay cut" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  29. receive or obtain by regular payment; "We take the Times every day" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  30. the act of photographing a scene or part of a scene without interruption Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  31. be seized or affected in a specified way; "take sick"; "be taken drunk" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  32. ascertain or determine by measuring, computing or take a reading from a dial; "take a pulse"; "A reading was taken of the earth's tremors" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  33. take into consideration for exemplifying purposes; "Take the case of China"; "Consider the following case" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  34. obtain by winning; "Winner takes all"; "He took first prize" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  35. travel or go by means of a certain kind of transportation, or a certain route; "He takes the bus to work"; "She takes Route 1 to Newark" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  36. proceed along in a vehicle; "We drive the turnpike to work" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  37. occupy or take on; "He assumes the lotus position"; "She took her seat on the stage"; "We took our seats in the orchestra"; "She took up her position behind the tree"; "strike a pose" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  38. head into a specified direction; "The escaped convict took to the hills"; "We made for the mountains" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  39. experience or feel or submit to; "Take a test"; "Take the plunge" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  40. to get into a position of having, e.g., safety, comfort; "take shelter from the storm" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  41. take into one's possession; "We are taking an orphan from Romania"; "I'll take three salmon steaks" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  42. take by force; "Hitler took the Baltic Republics"; "The army took the fort on the hill" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  43. buy, select; "I'll take a pound of that sausage" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  44. develop a habit; "He took to visiting bars" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  45. carry out; "take action"; "take steps"; "take vengeance" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  46. To make a picture, photograph, or the like, of; as, to take a group or a scene. Webster Dictionary DB
  47. To give or deliver (a blow to); to strike; hit; as, he took me in the face; he took me a blow on the head. Webster Dictionary DB
  48. Taken. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  49. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands, or otherwise; to grasp; to get into one's hold or possession; to procure; to seize and carry away; to convey. Webster Dictionary DB
  50. To obtain possession of by force or artifice; to get the custody or control of; to reduce into subjection to one's power or will; to capture; to seize; to make prisoner; as, to take am army, a city, or a ship; also, to come upon or befall; to fasten on; to attack; to seize; -- said of a disease, misfortune, or the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  51. To gain or secure the interest or affection of; to captivate; to engage; to interest; to charm. Webster Dictionary DB
  52. To make selection of; to choose; also, to turn to; to have recourse to; as, to take the road to the right. Webster Dictionary DB
  53. To employ; to use; to occupy; hence, to demand; to require; as, it takes so much cloth to make a coat. Webster Dictionary DB
  54. To form a likeness of; to copy; to delineate; to picture; as, to take picture of a person. Webster Dictionary DB
  55. To draw; to deduce; to derive. Webster Dictionary DB
  56. To assume; to adopt; to acquire, as shape; to permit to one's self; to indulge or engage in; to yield to; to have or feel; to enjoy or experience, as rest, revenge, delight, shame; to form and adopt, as a resolution; -- used in general senses, limited by a following complement, in many idiomatic phrases; as, to take a resolution; I take the liberty to say. Webster Dictionary DB
  57. To lead; to conduct; as, to take a child to church. Webster Dictionary DB
  58. To carry; to convey; to deliver to another; to hand over; as, he took the book to the bindery. Webster Dictionary DB
  59. In a somewhat passive sense, to receive; to bear; to endure; to acknowledge; to accept. Webster Dictionary DB
  60. To accept, as something offered; to receive; not to refuse or reject; to admit. Webster Dictionary DB
  61. To receive as something to be eaten or dronk; to partake of; to swallow; as, to take food or wine. Webster Dictionary DB
  62. Not to refuse or balk at; to undertake readily; to clear; as, to take a hedge or fence. Webster Dictionary DB
  63. To bear without ill humor or resentment; to submit to; to tolerate; to endure; as, to take a joke; he will take an affront from no man. Webster Dictionary DB
  64. To take hold; to fix upon anything; to have the natural or intended effect; to accomplish a purpose; as, he was inoculated, but the virus did not take. Webster Dictionary DB
  65. To please; to gain reception; to succeed. Webster Dictionary DB
  66. To admit of being pictured, as in a photograph; as, his face does not take well. Webster Dictionary DB
  67. That which is taken; especially, the quantity of fish captured at one haul or catch. Webster Dictionary DB
  68. The quantity or copy given to a compositor at one time. Webster Dictionary DB
  69. To remove; to withdraw; to deduct; - with from; as, to take the breath from one; to take two from four. Webster Dictionary DB
  70. To accept the word or offer of; to receive and accept; to bear; to submit to; to enter into agreement with; - used in general senses; as, to take a form or shape. Webster Dictionary DB
  71. To move or direct the course; to resort; to betake one's self; to proceed; to go; - usually with to; as, the fox, being hard pressed, took to the hedge. Webster Dictionary DB
  72. To lay or seize hold of; obtain; receive into one's hold or possession; as, to take six yards of silk; capture; engage or interest; as, to take the eye; choose; employ; assume; as, to take another name; quote; as, to take a passage from a play; subtract; transport; require or demand; as, it takes time to learn to swim; to contract by infection; to regard or look upon; as, to take a man for a detective; to observe; to gather; as, I took this meaning from what he said; to experience; as, he took much comfort in his home; to make or perform, as a journey; to resort to; as, she has taken up music; to find out; as, to take his measure; to accept; to receive into the body, as medicine; to make a photograph of. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  73. To have recourse; as, the man has taken to drink; colloquially, prove attractive; have the intended effect; as, the inoculation took. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  74. The amount or quantity received or caught, especially fish. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  75. Taker. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  76. Took. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  77. Taking. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  78. To lay hold of: to get into one's possession: to catch: to capture: to captivate: to receive: to choose: to use: to allow: to understand: to agree to: to become affected with. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  79. To catch: to have the intended effect: to gain reception, to please: to move or direct the course of: to have recourse to:-pa.t. took; pa.p. taken. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  80. To have effect; gain reception; please. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  81. To receive; seize; capture; catch; choose; use; conduct; convey. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  82. To gain possession of; seize; secure; carry off; convey; abstract; deduct; employ; contract, as a disease. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  83. To have effect; incline or resort to; please. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  84. The act of taking, or that which is taken. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  85. Amount received or caught. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  86. To get hold or gain possession of; to receive what is offered; to lay hold of; to receive; to catch; to seize; to make prisoner; to captivate; to entrap; to understand; to employ; to agree to; to swallow; to choose; to endure; to assume; to allow; to rent or hire; to copy. To take away, to deprive of, to take care, to be solicitous for; to be cautious. To take care of, to have the charge of. To take a course, to resort to. To take down, to bring lower; to pull down; to write. To take from, to deprive of; to subtract; to detract. To take heed, to be careful. To take hold, to fix on. To take in, to in-close; to comprise; to furl; to cheat or deceive; to admit. To lake in hand, to undertake. To take notice, to observe; to make remark upon. To take oath, to swear with solemnity. To take off, to remove; to cut off; to destroy; to withdraw; to swallow; to copy; to imitate; to mimic. To take out, to remove. To take part, to share; to side. To take place, to come to pass. To take root, to live and grow, as a plant. To take up, to raise; to buy or borrow; to engross; to occupy; to arrest; to adopt; to collect. To take up arms, to begin war. To take the field, to encamp. To take upon, to assume. To take to heart, to be sensibly affected by. To take advantage of, to catch by surprise. To take leave, to bid adien. To take breath, to rest. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  87. To move or direct the course; to betake one's self; to please; to gain reception; to have the intended or natural effect. To take after, to learn to follow. To take in with, to resort to. To take for, to mistake. To take on, to be violently affected. To take to, to be fond of; to resort to. To take up with, to be contented to receive. To take with, to please. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  88. To obtain in almost any manner; to receive; to receive in any disposition of mind; to suppose; to receive in thought; to lay hold of; to seize; to entrap; to swallow; to understand in a particular sense or manner; to delight; to engage; to use or employ; to procure; to turn to; to choose; to go into, as to take the water; to pursue or follow, as a course; to copy or paint; to change with respect of place, as he took out his hand; to hire or rent, as a house; to enter upon, as a campaign; to please; to catch; to be fixed. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  89. The quantity of fish captured at one haul or catch; a quantity, as of copy, by a compositor. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  90. To remove; to withdraw; to deduct; -- with from; as, to take the breath from one; to take two from four. mso.anu.edu.au
  91. To admit, as, something presented to the mind; not to dispute; to allow; to accept; to receive in thought; to entertain in opinion; to understand; to interpret; to regard or look upon; to consider; to suppose; as, to take a thing for granted; this I take to be man's motive; to take men for spies. mso.anu.edu.au
  92. To accept the word or offer of; to receive and accept; to bear; to submit to; to enter into agreement with; -- used in general senses; as, to take a form or shape. mso.anu.edu.au
  93. To move or direct the course; to resort; to betake one's self; to proceed; to go; -- usually with to; as, the fox, being hard pressed, took to the hedge. mso.anu.edu.au
  94. This is a technical expression which signifies to be entitled to; as, a devisee will take under the will. To take also signifies to seize, as to take and carry away. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  95. To obtain possession of by force or artifice; to get the custody or control of; to reduce into subjection to one's power or will; to capture; to seize; to make prisoner; as, to take an army, a city, or a ship; also, to come upon or befall; to fasten on; to attack; to seize; said of a disease, misfortune, or the like. dictgcide_fs
  96. To employ; to use; to occupy; hence, to demand; to require; as, it takes so much cloth to make a coat; it takes five hours to get to Boston from New York by car. dictgcide_fs
  97. To form a likeness of; to copy; to delineate; to picture; as, to take a picture of a person. dictgcide_fs
  98. To assume; to adopt; to acquire, as shape; to permit to one's self; to indulge or engage in; to yield to; to have or feel; to enjoy or experience, as rest, revenge, delight, shame; to form and adopt, as a resolution; used in general senses, limited by a following complement, in many idiomatic phrases; as, to take a resolution; I take the liberty to say. dictgcide_fs
  99. To carry; to convey; to deliver to another; to hand over; as, he took the book to the bindery; he took a dictionary with him. dictgcide_fs
  100. To remove; to withdraw; to deduct; with from; as, to take the breath from one; to take two from four. dictgcide_fs
  101. To receive as something to be eaten or drunk; to partake of; to swallow; as, to take food or wine. dictgcide_fs
  102. To accept the word or offer of; to receive and accept; to bear; to submit to; to enter into agreement with; used in general senses; as, to take a form or shape. dictgcide_fs
  103. To move or direct the course; to resort; to betake one's self; to proceed; to go; usually with to; as, the fox, being hard pressed, took to the hedge. dictgcide_fs
  104. That which is taken, such as the quantity of fish captured at one haul or catch, or the amouont of money collected during one event; as, the box-office take. dictgcide_fs
  105. t[=a]k, v.t. to lay hold of: to get into one's possession: to catch: to capture: to captivate: to receive: to choose: to use: to allow: to understand: to agree to: to become affected with.--v.i. to catch: to have the intended effect: to gain reception, to please: to move or direct the course of: to have recourse to:--pa.t. took; pa.p. t[=a]'ken.--n. quantity of fish taken or captured at one time.--ns. TAKE'-IN, an imposition, fraud: that by which one is deceived; TAKE'-OFF, a burlesque representation of any one; T[=A]'KER; T[=A]'KING, act of taking or gaining possession: a seizing: agitation, excitement: (Spens. sickness: (Shak.) witchery: malignant influence.--adj. captivating: alluring.--adv. T[=A]'KINGLY.--n. T[=A]'KINGNESS, quality of being taking or attractive.--adj. T[=A]'KY, attractive.--TAKE ADVANTAGE OF, to employ to advantage: to make use of circumstances to the prejudice of; TAKE AFTER, to follow in resemblance; TAKE AIR, to be disclosed or made public; TAKE BREATH, to stop in order to breathe, to be refreshed; TAKE CARE, CARE OF (see CARE); TAKE DOWN, to reduce: to bring down from a higher place, to lower: to swallow: to pull down: to write down; TAKE FOR, to mistake; TAKE FRENCH LEAVE (see FRENCH); TAKE FROM, to derogate or detract from; TAKE HEED, to be careful; TAKE HEED TO, to attend to with care; TAKE IN, to enclose, to embrace: to receive: to contract, to furl, as a sail: to comprehend: to accept as true: to cheat: (Shak.) to conquer; TAKE IN HAND, to undertake; TAKE INTO ONE'S HEAD, to be seized with a sudden notion; TAKE IN VAIN, to use with unbecoming levity or profaneness; TAKE IN WITH, to deceive by means of; TAKE IT OUT OF, to extort reparation from: to exhaust the strength or energy of; TAKE LEAVE (see LEAVE); TAKEN IN, deceived, cheated; TAKE NOTICE, to observe: to show that observation is made: (with of) to remark upon; TAKE OFF, to remove: to swallow: to mimic or imitate; TAKE ON, to take upon: to claim a character: (coll.) to grieve; TAKE ORDERS, to receive ordination; TAKE ORDER WITH (Bacon), to check; TAKE OUT, to remove from within: to deduct: (Shak.) to copy; TAKE PART, to share; TAKE PLACE, to happen: to prevail; TAKE ROOT, to strike out roots, to live and grow, as a plant: to be established; TAKE THE FIELD, to begin military operations; TAKE THE WALL OF, to pass on the side nearest the wall: to get the advantage of; TAKE TO, to apply to: to resort to: to be fond of; TAKE TO HEART, to feel sensibly; TAKE UP, to lift, to raise: (Shak.) to borrow money, to buy on credit, to make up a quarrel: to employ, occupy or fill: to arrest: to comprise; TAKE UP ARMS, to commence to fight; TAKE UPON, to assume; TAKE UP WITH, to be pleased or contented with, to form a connection with, to fall in love with: to lodge; TAKE WITH, to be pleased with. [M. E. taken--Scand.; Ice. taka pa.t. tók, pa.p. tekinn); conn. with L. tang[)e]re, tetig-i, to touch, and with Eng. tack.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  106. (took, taken). Lay hold of with the hand (s) or other part of the body or with any instrument (lit. & fig.), grasp, seize, capture, catch by pursuit or surprise, captivate, win, gain, as t. it between your finger& thumb, took him by the throat, t. it up with the tongs, t. the BULL by the horns, deuce t. it!, t. BIT between teeth, t. a fortress, t. by Storm, took 113 prisoners, was taken prisoner or captive, took his bishop (at chess), t. the odd trick (at cards), takes (gains, receives in payment) £40 a week, took (gained) little by this move, took first prize, rabbit taken in trap, took (surprised, caught) him in the act or at a disadvantage, was taken ill, taken aback, what takes (captivates) my fancy, was much taken (charmed) with or by her manners, novel did not t. (become popular), vaccine did not t. (operate); assume possession of, procure e.g. by purchase, acquire, avail oneself of, use, use up, consume, require as instrument, material, agent, &c., as takes what-ever he can lay his hands on, wish you would not t. my bicycle, t. (assume or enjoy as one\'s right) precedence, took his degree, t. ORDERs, t. SILK, shall t. a holiday, (cooking direction) t. 1 oz. of curry powder, do you t. (buy regularly, subscribe to) Punch?, am not taking any (slang), decline offer, took (engaged) seats in advance, must t. lessons, lodgings, a cab, will t. (buy) 2lb., t. legal, medical, &c., advice, consult lawyer &c. (& see below), t. (as instance) the French Revolution, has taken a partner, a wife, (archaic) took to (as) wife Jane Smith, t. a BACK seat, took his seat on the railing, must t. the liberty of differing from you, must t. leave to differ, took a mean advantage, do not t. advantage (avail yourself unfairly) of his youth, t. the opportunity, will t. (drink) a cup of tea, takes too much alcohol, these things t. time, t. your time, do not hurry, it takes a lot of doing (is hard to do), takes a poet to translate Virgil; cause to come with one, carry with one, conduct, convey, remove, dispossess person &c. of, as t. the letters to the post, the dog for a walk, the children to the pantomime, the corkscrew from the shelf, takes his readers with him (engrosses their attention), t. him through (make him read) a book of Livy, took him into partnership, takes all the fun out of it, t. to TASK, t. in HAND, (see also special uses w. advv. & prepp.); catch, be infected with, (cold, fever, &c.) conceive, experience, indulge, give play to, exert, as t. offence, umbrage, t. a fancy to, takes a pride in his work, a pleasure in contradicting, t. pity on him, t. no notice, t. heed, pains, trouble; ascertain (person\'s measure, height, temperature, address, &c.) by inquiry, measurement, &c.; apprehend, grasp mentally, infer, conclude, understand, interpret, as I t. your meaning or (archaic) you, I t. this to be ironical, It. it that we are to wait here, t. person at his WORD, how would you t. (translate, interpret) this passage?, t. it for granted, assume it, do you t. me for (think me) a fool?; treat or regard in specified manner, adopt specified attitude towards, as t. things coolly, t. it easy, should t. it kindly of you (be obliged) if you would answer my letter, must not t. it ill of him (resent his conduct), t. to HEART; accept, put up with, submit to, adopt, choose, receive, derive, as t. the offer, t. what you can get, the bet was taken, I took him (his bet), must t. us as you find us, will t. no nonsense, will not t. this treatment, took it like a lamb, will not t. a hint, t. advice, act on it (& see above), you may t. it from me or t. my word for it, I, a well-informed person, assure you, t. sides, join one of two parties, t. (hold, adopt) a different view, takes its name from the inventor; perform, execute, make, undertake, negotiate, deal with, as took work for a friend, t. notes, t. a photograph, took a sudden leap, horse will not t. fence, t. a walk, t. (be examined in) the mathematical tripos, t. (conduct) the evening service, t. a glance round you, took a deep breath, t. an oath; photograph, come out well &c. when photographed, as t. him in cap& gown, does not t. well; t. account of, include in one\'s reckoning, not overlook; t. aim, direct weapon or missile (at object); t. care, be careful, be on one\'s guard, not neglect or fail, be cautious in arranging or deciding, as t. care!, t. care to leave plenty of room, t. care not to wake the baby, t. care how you speak or what you say to him; t. care of, be careful of, be in charge of; t. one\'s chance, accept risk (of); t. earth, (of fox &c., fig. of person) escape into hole; t. EFFECT, EXCEPtion, HEART (of grace), HOLD, LEAVE (of); t. one\'s life in one\'s hand, risk it; t. person\'s esp. God\'s name in vain, use it lightly or profanely; t. PART; t. place, happen; t. STOCK (of, in); t. the WALL, t. WIND. Spec. uses w. prepp., advv., & adv. phrr.: T. after, resemble (person esp. parent or relation) in character, feature, &c. T. back colloq., retract (words). T. down: write down, as t. down his name& address, took down the sermon in shorthand; humble, esp. t. person down a PEG or two; swallow (food &c.) esp. with difficulty or reluctance; remove (building, structure) by taking to pieces. T. from, diminish, lessen, weaken, as such faults do not t. from his credit as a historian. T. in: admit, receive, (lodgers, guest, &c.); receive (washing, sewing, typewriting, &c.) to be done at home; include, comprise; reduce (garment &c.) to smaller compass, furl (sail); understand, digest mentally; believe (false statement); deceive; cheat; t. (newspaper &c.) by subscription; t.-in n., a fraud, deception, piece of humbug. T. into: t. into one\'s confidence, confide in; t. into one\'s head, conceive, get hold of, (idea), imagine, adopt the belief, (that), resolve (to do). T. off: remove (clothes, hat, &c.) from the body; remove, conduct away, as took him off to the station, took himself off, went off; deduct (part of price); drink off; ridicule by imitation, mimic; jump, spring, (from, at, place); t.-off n., caricature, spot from which one jumps, (Croquet) stroke causing one\'s own ball to go forward while touching but scarcely moving another. T. on: undertake (work, responsibility); t. person on at golf &c., play with him; (colloq.) show violent emotion, make a fuss. T. out: cause to come out, bring or convey out, as t. him out for a walk, tooks must not be taken out of the library; remove (stain &c.); t. the nonsense &c. out of person, cure him of it; accept payment of (debt &c.) or compensation for (injury &c.) in, as took it out in cigars& drinks; t. it out of, have revenge on, get satisfaction from, exhaust the strength of; procure, get issued, (patent, summons, &c.). T. over, succeed to management or ownership of (business &c.). T. to: begin, fall into the habit of, begin to busy oneself with, as took to humming a tune, t. to bad habits, literature; conceive a liking for (person &c.). T. up: lift up; absorb, occupy, engage, as sponges t. up water, takes up all my time, my attention; train stops to t. up (admit) passengers; t. into custody; enter upon (profession, subject); pursue (matter, inquiry) further; secure, fasten, (dropped stitch, artery, &c.); furnish the amount of (loan &c.); t. up with, consort with; t. up the CUDGELS, GAUNTLET, GLOVE; t.-up n. (mech.), kinds of device for tightening band &c. in machine, drawing up slack of thread, removing material that has been operated on, &c. T. (it) upon or on one to, venture, presume, to. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  107. Amount (of fish, game, &c.) taken or caught; (Print.) amount of copy set up at one time; takings, esp. money received at theatre for seats. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  108. (Gram., of verb, preposition, &c.) require or admit of (specified case, mood, construction); t. (lady) in (to dinner), conduct from drawing-room to dining-room& sit beside; t. in hand, undertake the control or reform of (the boy wants taking in hand); t. up, (also) interrupt or correct (speaker), make a protege of. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  109. In Printing, the quantity of copy taken in hand by a compositor at once. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  110. n. The quantity of fish captured at one haul or catch ;-the quantity of copy taken in hand by a compositor at one time. Cabinet Dictionary

What are the misspellings for take?

X