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Definitions of tax

  1. To impose a rate or duty upon for state or city purposes; burden; as, to tax one's memory; accuse. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  2. To lay a tax on: to burden: to accuse. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  3. To lay a tax on; burden; accuse. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  4. To subject to a severe strain. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  5. use to the limit; "you are taxing my patience" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. make a charge against or accuse; "They taxed him failure to appear in court" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. levy a tax on; "The State taxes alcohol heavily"; "Clothing is not taxed in our state" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. To lay, impose or assess upon citizens a certain sum for the public benefit; to load with a burden or burdens; to assess, fix, or determine judicially; to charge; to censure; to accuse. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  9. A charge, especially a pecuniary burden which is imposed by authority. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A charge or burden laid upon persons or property for the support of a government. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. Especially, the sum laid upon specific things, as upon polls, lands, houses, income, etc.; as, a land tax; a window tax; a tax on carriages, and the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A task exacted from one who is under control; a contribution or service, the rendering of which is imposed upon a subject. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A disagreeable or burdensome duty or charge; as, a heavy tax on time or health. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Charge; censure. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A lesson to be learned; a task. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To subject to the payment of a tax or taxes; to impose a tax upon; to lay a burden upon; especially, to exact money from for the support of government. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To assess, fix, or determine judicially, the amount of; as, to tax the cost of an action in court. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To charge; to accuse; also, to censure; - often followed by with, rarely by of before an indirect object; as, to tax a man with pride. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A charge or duty on income or property, imposed by government for the use of the public; a heavy or oppressive burden. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. A rate imposed on property or persons for the benefit of the state: anything imposed: a burdensome duty. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. Rate assessed on property or persons for public uses; anything imposed or exacted. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  22. A compulsory contribution for the support of government; any assessment. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. A heavy demand upon one's resources. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. A rate or sum of money assessed on person or property for the benefit of a state, corporation, society, parish or company; impost; tribute. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.

What are the misspellings for tax?

Usage examples for tax

  1. Yes, it is all very true, if you take no account of the fifty millions until the moment when the State begins to spend them; if you only see where they go, and not whence they come; if you look only at the good they are to do when they come out of the tax gatherer's bag, and not at the harm which has been done, and the good which has been prevented, by putting them into it. – Essays on Political Economy by Frederic Bastiat
  2. It has been the policy of the Government to collect the principal part of its revenues by a tax upon imports, and no change in this policy is desirable. – Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present by Various
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