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Definitions of telephone

  1. get or try to get into communication (with someone) by telephone; "I tried to call you all night"; "Take two aspirin and call me in the morning" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. electronic equipment that converts sound into electrical signals that can be transmitted over distances and then converts received signals back into sounds; "I talked to him on the telephone" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. transmitting speech at a distance Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. An instrument for reproducing sounds, especially articulate speech, at a distance. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To convey or announce by telephone. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. An instrument for reproducing sounds especially articulate speech at a distance. (Webster, 3rd ed) Medical Dictionary DB
  7. An instrument for sending and receiving speech or other sounds at a distance by means of electricity. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. To communicate or talk by such an instrument. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. In a general sense, any instrument or apparatus which transmits sound beyond its natural limits of audibility; thus the speaking-tube so much used in conveying the sound of the voice from one room to another in large buildings, or a stretched cord or wire attached to vibrating membranes or discs, constitutes virtually a telephone. But the name is generally restricted to an instrument transmitting sound by means of electricity and telegraph wires. About the year 1860 the idea that sound-producing vibrations could be transmitted through a wire by means of electricity began to be recognized by several men of science. Reis of Frankfort invented an apparatus which could reproduce at a distant station the pitch of a musical sound by means of a discontinuous current along a telegraph wire. A great step in advance was made in 1876 when Prof. Graham Bell, a Scotchman resident in this country, discovered an articulating telephone which depends upon the principle of the undulating current, and by means of which the very quality of a note, and therefore conversation itself, could be reproduced at a distant station. Several varieties of telephonic apparatus are now in everyday use for intercommunication between distant places. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. To send by telephone; talk through the telephone. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  11. An instrument for reproducing sound at a distant point, especially by electricity. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. Telephonic. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. An apparatus for transmitting sound to a distance by means of electricity. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  14. To transmit by telephone. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  15. tel'e-f[=o]n, n. an instrument for reproducing sound at a distance over a conducting wire or cord, esp. by means of electricity.--v.t. and v.i. to communicate by telephone.--n. TEL'EPH[=O]NER, one who uses a telephone.--adj. TELEPHON'IC.--adv. TELEPHON'ICALLY.--ns. TEL'EPH[=O]NIST, one who uses the telephone, one skilled in its use; TELEPH[=O]'NOGRAPH, an apparatus for recording a telephone message.--adj. TELEPHONOGRAPH'IC.--n. TEL'EPHONY, the art of telephoning. [Gr. t[=e]le, far, ph[=o]n[=e], a sound.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  16. Apparatus for transmitting sound esp. speech to a distance by wire or cord, esp. by means of electricity; (vb) send (message &c.), speak, to (person) by t. Hence telephonic a., telephonically adv., telephonist (3), telephony n. [Greek] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  17. An instrument for reproducing sound at a distant point by the transmission of impulses over a conducting wire or cord, especially by the agency of electricity. [Gr.] Appleton's medical dictionary.
  18. The invention of the telephone is claimed by Gray, of Chicago; Bell, formerly of the Institute of Technology, of Boston, now of Washington, and several others. The possibility of such an instrument was discovered previous to 1873, but the first satisfactory results were not obtained until 1877, when Bell completed and put into practical use a telephone line between Salem and Boston, Gray achieving a like result the same year in a line set up between Chicago and Milwaukee, a distance of eighty-five miles. By 1880 there were in existence 148 telephone companies and private concerns, operating 34,305 miles of wire (1893, 308,000 miles). Conversation can now be carried on easily between New York and Chicago, and for even greater distances. The Bell Company is the most extensive. Two suits have been brought against the patent, but both have failed. Dictionary of United States history
  19. [Gr.] An instrument for reproducing the pitch, quality, and relative intensity of sounds at a place distant from that at which the sounds are uttered. Its action depends on the fact that a succession of electric waves can be sent along a wire from the transmitting end exactly corresponding to the aerial vibration, which produce the sensation of sound, and therefore capable of reproducing similar aerial vibrations, at the receiving end. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy

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