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Definitions of thick

  1. used informally Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. (used informally) associated on close terms; "a close friend"; "the bartender was chummy with the regular customers"; "the two were thick as thieves for months" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. closely crowded together; "a compact shopping center"; "a dense population"; "thick crowds" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. heavy and compact in form or stature; "a wrestler of compact build"; "he was tall and heavyset"; "stocky legs"; "a thick middle-aged man"; "a thickset young man" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. hard to pass through because of dense growth; "dense vegetation"; "thick woods" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. wide from side to side; "a heavy black mark" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. the location of something surrounded by other things; "in the midst of the crowd" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. spoken as if with a thick tongue; "the thick speech of a drunkard"; "his words were slurred" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. in quick succession; "misfortunes come fast and thick" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. with a thick consistency; "the blood was flowing thick" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. abundantly covered of filled; "the top was thick with dust" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. abundant; "a thick head of hair" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. relatively dense in consistency; "thick cream"; "thick soup"; "thick smoke"; "thick fog" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. abundantly covered or filled; "the top was thick with dust" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. (of darkness) very intense; "thick night"; "thick darkness"; "a face in deep shadow"; "deep night" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. not thin; of a specific thickness or of relatively great extent from one surface to the opposite usually in the smallest of the three solid dimensions; "an inch thick"; "a thick board"; "a thick sandwich"; "spread a thick layer of butter". Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. Having more depth or extent from one surface to its opposite than usual; not thin or slender; as, a thick plank; thick cloth; thick paper; thick neck. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Dense; not thin; inspissated; as, thick vapors. Also used figuratively; as, thick darkness. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Not transparent or clear; hence, turbid, muddy, or misty; as, the water of a river is apt to be thick after a rain. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Abundant, close, or crowded in space; closely set; following in quick succession; frequently recurring. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Not having due distinction of syllables, or good articulation; indistinct; as, a thick utterance. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Deep; profound; as, thick sleep. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Dull; not quick; as, thick of fearing. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Intimate; very friendly; familiar. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. The thickest part, or the time when anything is thickest. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A thicket; as, gloomy thicks. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Frequently; fast; quick. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. Closely; as, a plat of ground thick sown. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To a great depth, or to a greater depth than usual; as, land covered thick with manure. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To thicken. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. Measuring in the third dimension other than length and breadth, or in general dimension other than length; - said of a solid body; as, a timber seven inches thick. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. Not thin; having considerable distance between two opposite surfaces; as, a thick book; not slender; as, a thick staff; closely set, as trees; dense; as, a thick cloud; crowded; not clear; as, the air was thick; misty; muddy; dull or stupid; colloquially, very intimate; indistinct, as speech. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. Closely; as, thick and fast they came. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  34. The densest part: as, the thick of the fight. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  35. Thickly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. Thickness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. Dense: imperfectly mobile: compact: not transparent or clear: misty: dull: crowded: closely set: abundant: frequent, in quick succession: having great depth or circumference. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  38. Closely: frequently: fast: to a great depth. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  39. Closely; in quick succession; to a great depth. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  40. Not thin; large in depth or girth; dense; not clear; closely set; numerous. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  41. Having relatively great distance from one surface to its opposite. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. Having a specified dimension distinguished from length and width. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. Arranged compactly; close; dense; abundant. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. Foggy; misty; dull. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. The dimension of thickness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  46. The time when or place where any thing is thickest or most intense. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. In a thick manner. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. Dense; not thin; inspissated; turbid; muddy; having more depth or extent from one surface to its opposite than usual; crowded close; following close or fast; not distinctly articulate; dull. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  49. Frequently; fast; closely; to a great depth. Thick and thin, whatever is in the way. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  50. The thickest part. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  51. Not thin; dense; close; compact, muddy; not clear; having more depth from side to side, or from sufrace to surfacem than in common use; deep, as five inches thick; crowded; followin each other in quick succession; dark; obscure; dull; stupid; intimate or familiar, as he is very thick with him. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  52. The thickest or most crowded part. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  53. Fast; frequently; to a greater depth than usual. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  54. Measuring in the third dimension other than length and breadth, or in general dimension other than length; -- said of a solid body; as, a timber seven inches thick. mso.anu.edu.au
  55. Measuring in the third dimension other than length and breadth, or in general dimension other than length; said of a solid body; as, a timber seven inches thick. dictgcide_fs
  56. thik, adj. dense: imperfectly mobile: compact: not transparent or clear: misty: dull, mentally clouded: crowded: closely set: abundant: frequent, in quick succession: having great depth or circumference: (coll.) in fast friendship.--n. the thickest part of anything: a stupid person.--adv. closely: frequently: fast: to a great depth.--adjs. THICK'-AND-THIN, thorough, completely devoted; THICK'-COM'ING (Shak.), coming fast or close together.--v.t. THICK'EN, to make thick or close: to strengthen.--v.i. to become thick or obscure: to crowd or press.--ns. THICK'ENING, something put into a liquid or mass to make it more thick; THICK'ET, a collection of trees or shrubs thickly or closely set: close wood or copse.--adjs. THICK'-HEAD'ED, having a thick head or skull: stupid; THICK'ISH, somewhat thick.--n. THICK'-KNEE, a stone-plover.--adj. THICK'-LIPPED (Shak.), having thick lips.--adv. THICK'LY.--n. THICK'NESS.--adjs. THICK'-PLEACHED (Shak.), closely interwoven; THICK'-SET, closely planted: having a short, thick body.--n. THICK'-SKIN, a person wanting sensibility: a dull, stupid person, a blockhead.--adj. THICK'-SKINNED, having a thick skin: wanting sensibility: dull: obtuse.--n. THICK'-SKULL (same as THICK-SKIN).--adjs. THICK'-SKULLED, having a thick skull: dull: stupid; THICK'-SPRUNG (Shak.), that have sprung up thick or close together.--n. THICK'UN (slang), a sovereign: a crown.--LAY IT ON THICK, to flatter or praise extravagantly; THROUGH THICK AND THIN, in spite of all obstacles, without any wavering. [A.S. thicce; cog. with Ger. dick.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  57. thik, n. (Spens.) a thicket.--v.i. (Spens.) to grow dense. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  58. Of great or specified depth between opposite surfaces, as bread is (cut) too t., spread the butter t., a board two inches t., how t. was it?; arranged closely, crowded together, as t. hair, forest, crowd grew thicker; numerous, as fell t. as peas; abounding, packed, with, as trees t. with leaves, air t. with snow; of firm consistency, as t. paste, soup; turbid, muddy, cloudy, not clear, as t. puddles, weather is still t.; stupid, dull; (of voice) muffled, indistinct; (colloq.) intimate, esp. t. as thieves; thickhead, blockhead; t.-headed, stupid; thickset, set or growing close together, heavily or solidly built, (n.) kind of stout fustian, (also t.-s. hedge) close-grown hedge; t.-skinned, (fig.) not sensitive to reproach, insult, &c., stolid; t.-skulled, -witted, stupid; thickun (slang), sovereign (coin). (N.) the t. part of anything, esp. fig. in the t. of it (of fight &c.); (colloq.) stupid person; through t. & thin, under all conditions, resolutely, so t.-&-thin a., as t.-&-thin supporters. (Adv.) thickly, as snow was falling t., blows came fast &t., heart beats t. Hence thickish a., thickly adv. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  59. a bit t., rather t., a little too t., &c. (slang), going beyond what is reasonable or endurable, too much of a good thing. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  60. n. The thickest part, or the time when any thing is thickest ;-a thicket. Cabinet Dictionary
  61. adv. Frequently; fast; quick;-closely; -to a great depth, or to a thicker depth than usual. Cabinet Dictionary

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