Spellcheck.net

Definitions of though

  1. despite the fact that; "even though she knew the answer, she did not respond" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. (postpositive) however; "it might be unpleasant, though" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. Nevertheless. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  4. Granting, admitting, or supposing that; notwithstanding that; if. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. However; nevertheless; notwithstanding; - used in familiar language, and in the middle or at the end of a sentence. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Granting or supposing that; notwithstanding the fact that; if: used after as; and yet. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7. Nevertheless; however. Also, tho. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. Admitting: allowing: even if: notwithstanding. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  9. Admitting; even if; notwithstanding. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  10. Notwithstanding the fact that. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  11. Even if. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. And yet; however. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. Granting; admitting; even if; notwithstanding; that. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  14. Granting or admitting, as "though he slay me, yet will I trust in him"; notwithstanding; however: as though, as if. Note.-In familiar language, though is used at the end of a sentence in the sense of however, yet, and is meant to reuder emphatic and affirmative the statement or opinion of the speaker-that, in spite of drawbacks, such "was or would be,"-as, "his division was successful though.". Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  15. However; nevertheless; notwithstanding; -- used in familiar language, and in the middle or at the end of a sentence. mso.anu.edu.au
  16. However; nevertheless; notwithstanding; used in familiar language, and in the middle or at the end of a sentence. dictgcide_fs
  17. th[=o], conj. admitting: allowing: even if notwithstanding. [Lit. 'on that' (condition), A.S. ðeáh, ðéh; cog. with Goth. thau-h, Ice. thó, Ger. doch; from the stem of the.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  18. (Also although) notwithstanding the fact that, as he finished first t. he began last, t. it was late we decided to set out; (also alt.) on the supposition that, as it is better to ask him (even) t. he (should) refuse or refuses; what t. (what does it matter if) the way is (archaic be) long?, as t., as if, as it is as t. a man should ask alms of a beggar, he acts as t. he were mad, it looks as t. he meant (vulg. means) business; (introducing what is virtually an independent sentence) and yet, as I have no doubt he will understand-t. you never know; (abs.) however, as I wish you had told me, t. [Middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  19. adv. & conj. [Anglo-Saxon, Gothic, Icelandic] Granting; admitting; notwithstanding ;-however- used in familiar language at the end of a sentence. Cabinet Dictionary

What are the misspellings for though?

X