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Definitions of thread

  1. to move or cause to move in a sinuous, spiral, or circular course; "the river winds through the hills"; "the path meanders through the vineyards"; "sometimes, the gout wanders through the entire body" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. any long object resembling a thin line; "a mere ribbon of land"; "the lighted ribbon of traffic"; "from the air the road was a gray thread"; "a thread of smoke climbed upward" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the raised helical rib going around a screw Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. thread on or as if on a string; "string pearls on a string"; "the child drew glass beads on a string" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a fine cord of twisted fibers (of cotton or silk or wool or nylon etc.) used in sewing and weaving Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. the connections that link the various parts of an event or argument together; "I couldn't follow his train of thought"; "he lost the thread of his argument" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. pass a thread through; "thread a needle" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. pass through or into; "thread tape"; "thread film" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. remove facial hair by tying a fine string around it and pulling at the string; "She had her eyebrows threaded" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. To strike (the cue ball) below the center so as to give it a backward rotation which causes it to take a backward direction on striking another ball. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. A very small twist of flax, wool, cotton, silk, or other fibrous substance, drawn out to considerable length; a compound cord consisting of two or more single yarns doubled, or joined together, and twisted. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A filament, as of a flower, or of any fibrous substance, as of bark; also, a line of gold or silver. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. The prominent part of the spiral of a screw or nut; the rib. See Screw, n., 1. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Fig.: Something continued in a long course or tenor; a,s the thread of life, or of a discourse. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Fig.: Composition; quality; fineness. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To pass a thread through the eye of; as, to thread a needle. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To pass or pierce through as a narrow way; also, to effect or make, as one's way, through or between obstacles; to thrid. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To form a thread, or spiral rib, on or in; as, to thread a screw or nut. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A very thin line or cord of flax, cotton, silk, or other fiberlike substance twisted and drawn out; a filament or fiber; something running through and connecting the parts of anything; as, the thread of a story; the spiral ridge of a screw. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. To pass something through the eye of, as a needle; to string, as beads; to pass through; as, to thread a narrow street; to make (one's way) with difficulty. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. 1. A fine spun filament of flax, silk, cotton, or other fibrous material. 2. A filiform or thread-like structure. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  22. Catgut, silk, ete., used for suturing. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  23. A very thin line of any substance twisted and drawn out: a filament of any fibrous substance: a fine line of yarn: anything resembling a thread: the prominent spiral part of a screw: something continued in long course: the uniform tenor of a discourse. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. To pass a thread through the eye of (as a needle): to pass or pierce through, as a narrow way. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  25. Thin twisted line or cord of any substance; filament; spiral ridge on a screw; continuity of thought. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  26. To pass a thread throught; pass through. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  27. To pass a thread through. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. To pick one's way, as through a wood. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. A slender cord. fiber, or line. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. The spiral ridge of a screw. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. A twisted filament of flax, wool, cotton, silk, or other fibrous substance; any fine filament; something continued in a long course; tenor; the spiral part of a screw. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  32. To pass a thread through the eye, as a needle; to pass or pierce through, as a narrow way or channel. Air-threads, the fine white filaments seen floating in the air in summer, the production of spiders. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  33. A thin string or line formed of any fibrous substance twisted together; any fine filament or line; the prominent spiral part of a screw; something continued in a course or tenor, as a discourse. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. To pass a thread through, as the eye of a needle; to pass or pierce through, as a narrow or intricate way. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  35. A very small twist of flax, wool, cotton, silk, or other fibrous substance, drawn out to considerable length; a compound cord consisting of two or more single yarns doubled, or joined together, and twisted; also, one fiber of a cord composed of multiple fibers. dictgcide_fs
  36. A filament of any substance, as of glass, gold or silver; a filamentous part of an object, such as a flower; a component fiber of any or of any fibrous substance, as of bark. dictgcide_fs
  37. Something continued in a long course or tenor; a recurrent theme or related sequence of events in a larger story; as the thread of a story, or of life, or of a discourse. dictgcide_fs
  38. A related sequence of instructions or actions within a program that runs at least in part independent of other actions within the program; such threads are capable of being executed only in oprating systems permittnig multitasking. dictgcide_fs
  39. A sequence of messages posted to an on-line newsgroup or discussion group, dealing with the same topic; messages in such a thread typically refer to a previous posting, thus allowing their identification as part of the thread. Some news-reading programs allow a user to follow a single such thread independent of the other postings to that newsgroup. dictgcide_fs
  40. thred, n. a very thin line of any substance twisted and drawn out: a filament of any fibrous substance: a fine line of yarn: anything resembling a thread: the prominent spiral part of a screw: something continued in long course: the uniform tenor of a discourse.--v.t. to pass a thread through the eye of (as a needle): to pass or pierce through, as a narrow way: to furnish with a thread.--adj. THREAD'BARE, worn to the bare thread: having the nap worn off: hackneyed: used till its novelty or interest is gone.--n. THREAD'BARENESS.--adj. THREAD'EN (Shak.), made of thread.--ns. THREAD'ER; THREAD'INESS, the state of being thread-like or slender: the quality of containing threads; THREAD'-LACE, lace made of linen thread; THREAD'-P[=A]'PER, a piece of thin soft paper for wrapping up a skein of thread.--n.pl. THREAD'-WORMS, a popular name for Nematoda, a class of more or less thread-like worms, many parasitic, others free-living.--adj. THREAD'Y, like thread: slender: containing, or consisting of, thread.--THREAD AND THRUM, all, the good and bad together; THREAD OF LIFE, the thread imagined to be spun and cut by the Fates.--LISLE THREAD, a fine hard-twisted linen thread originally made at Lille in France. [A.S. thr['æ]d--thráwan, to wind, to twist; Ger. drehen.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  41. Spun-out filament of cotton, flax, silk, wool, &c., yarn; thin cord of twisted yarns; gold t. (of silk &c. with gold wire wound round it); LISLE THREAD; t. & THRUM; t.- shaped thing, long slender body, e.g. spiral part of screw; thin seam or vein of ore; (fig.) the t. (course) of life, lost the t. (chain, connexion) of his argument; threadbare, (of cloth) worn so that nap is lost and t. visible, wearing such clothes, (fig.) well-worn, hackneyed, whence threadbareness n.; t. lace (made of t.); t.-mark, mark made in bank-note paper with highly-coloured silk fibres to prevent counterfeiting; t.-needle, children\'s game (old lady of Threadneedle St.); t.-paper, (strip of) soft thin paper used for rolling up t.; threadworm, kinds of t.-like worm, esp. one infesting rectum of children. Hence threadiness n., thready a. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  42. Pass thread through eye of (needle); string (beads &c.) on thread, make (chain &c.) thus; pick one\'s way through (maze, streets, crowded place, &c.), make one\'s way thus; streak (hair &c.) as with threads. [Middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  43. hang by a t., (of person\'s life &c.) be in precarious state, (of momentous issue &c.) be determinable either way by something still in doubt; resume or take up the t. of, proceed with after interruption; gather up the tt., bring the divisions of subject &c. into relation after separate treatment. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  44. n. [Anglo-Saxon, Icelandic, German] A very small twist of flax, wool, cotton, silk, or the like, drawn out to considerable length ;-a filament, as of a flower, or of any fibrous substance, as of bark;- also, a line of gold or silver ; -something continued in a long course or tenor;- the prominent spiral part of a screw or nut. Cabinet Dictionary

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