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Definitions of tide

  1. To work in or out of a river or harbour by favour of the tide. Spring-tide, full tide at its maximum, the result of the attractive force of the sun and moon when they act in a straight line, either in conjunction or opposition. Neap-tide, full tide at its minimum, which happens when the sun and moon act at right angles to each other. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To carry, as by a tide; to surmount, as a difficulty: followed by over. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To cause to float with the tide; to drive or carry with the tide or stream. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To be moved, as a ship, by drifting with the tide; to carry along. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  5. To drive with the stream. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  6. To pour a tide or flood: to work in or out of a river or harbor with the tide. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  7. be carried with the tide Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. cause to float with the tide Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. To drive with the stream; to work in or out of a harbour or stream by favour of the tide. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  10. Time; period; season. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. A stream; current; flood; as, a tide of blood. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Tendency or direction of causes, influences, or events; course; current. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Violent confluence. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. there are usually two high and two low tides each day Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. the periodic rise and fall of the sea level under the gravitational pull of the moon Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. something that may increase or decrease (like the tides of the sea); "a rising tide of popular interest" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. rise or move foward; "surging waves" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. The alternate rising and falling of the waters of the ocean, and of bays, rivers, etc., connected therewith. The tide ebbs and flows twice in each lunar day, or the space of a little more than twenty-four hours. It is occasioned by the attraction of the sun and moon (the influence of the latter being three times that of the former), acting unequally on the waters in different parts of the earth, thus disturbing their equilibrium. A high tide upon one side of the earth is accompanied by a high tide upon the opposite side. Hence, when the sun and moon are in conjunction or opposition, as at new moon and full moon, their action is such as to produce a greater than the usual tide, called the spring tide, as represented in the cut. When the moon is in the first or third quarter, the sun's attraction in part counteracts the effect of the moon's attraction, thus producing under the moon a smaller tide than usual, called the neap tide. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To betide; to happen. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Time or season: rare except in Eastertide, Christmastide, etc.; the regular of the ocean and the waters connected with it; stream or flood; the natural tendency of events. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. Time: season: the regular flux and reflux or rising and falling of the sea: course: a tide, time, or season: commotion: turning-point. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. Tidal. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. Time; season; ebb and flow of the sea; course. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. The periodic rise and fall of the ocean, due to the attraction of the sun and moon. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. A current; stream; drift; tendency. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. Time; season; the alternate rising and falling of the waters of the ocean, and of hays, rivers, &c., connected therewith; stream; course; current; a period of twelve hours. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  27. To work into or out of a river or harbor by drifting with the tide and anchoring when it becomes adverse. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. The alternate ebb and flow, or rising and falling, of the waters of the ocean, and bays, rivers, &c., connected with it; stream; current; favourable course; turning-point. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

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Usage examples for tide

  1. Now, you must think, it was even- tide by that they got to the outside of the town; but Mr. Great- heart knew the way to the old man's house. – The Works of John Bunyan Volume 3 by John Bunyan
  2. The mate observed: " The tide is with us." – An Outcast of the Islands by Joseph Conrad
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