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Definitions of tide

  1. there are usually two high and two low tides each day Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. rise in waves Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the periodic rise and fall of the sea level under the gravitational pull of the moon Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. something that may increase or decrease (like the tides of the sea); "a rising tide of popular interest" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. be carried with the tide Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. cause to float with the tide Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. rise or move foward; "surging waves" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. Time; period; season. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. The alternate rising and falling of the waters of the ocean, and of bays, rivers, etc., connected therewith. The tide ebbs and flows twice in each lunar day, or the space of a little more than twenty-four hours. It is occasioned by the attraction of the sun and moon (the influence of the latter being three times that of the former), acting unequally on the waters in different parts of the earth, thus disturbing their equilibrium. A high tide upon one side of the earth is accompanied by a high tide upon the opposite side. Hence, when the sun and moon are in conjunction or opposition, as at new moon and full moon, their action is such as to produce a greater than the usual tide, called the spring tide, as represented in the cut. When the moon is in the first or third quarter, the sun's attraction in part counteracts the effect of the moon's attraction, thus producing under the moon a smaller tide than usual, called the neap tide. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A stream; current; flood; as, a tide of blood. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. Tendency or direction of causes, influences, or events; course; current. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Violent confluence. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. The period of twelve hours. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To cause to float with the tide; to drive or carry with the tide or stream. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To betide; to happen. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To pour a tide or flood. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Time or season: rare except in Eastertide, Christmastide, etc.; the regular of the ocean and the waters connected with it; stream or flood; the natural tendency of events. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. To be moved, as a ship, by drifting with the tide; to carry along. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. Time: season: the regular flux and reflux or rising and falling of the sea: course: a tide, time, or season: commotion: turning-point. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. To drive with the stream. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  21. To pour a tide or flood: to work in or out of a river or harbor with the tide. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. Tidal. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. Time; season; ebb and flow of the sea; course. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. To carry, as by a tide; to surmount, as a difficulty: followed by over. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. The periodic rise and fall of the ocean, due to the attraction of the sun and moon. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. A current; stream; drift; tendency. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. Time; season; the alternate rising and falling of the waters of the ocean, and of hays, rivers, &c., connected therewith; stream; course; current; a period of twelve hours. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  28. To work in or out of a river or harbour by favour of the tide. Spring-tide, full tide at its maximum, the result of the attractive force of the sun and moon when they act in a straight line, either in conjunction or opposition. Neap-tide, full tide at its minimum, which happens when the sun and moon act at right angles to each other. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. To work into or out of a river or harbor by drifting with the tide and anchoring when it becomes adverse. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. The alternate ebb and flow, or rising and falling, of the waters of the ocean, and bays, rivers, &c., connected with it; stream; current; favourable course; turning-point. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. To drive with the stream; to work in or out of a harbour or stream by favour of the tide. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. t[=i]d, n. time: season: the regular flux and reflux or rhythmic ebb and flow of the sea: course: a tide, time, or season, a feast-day, festival, a certain time, a day of twelve hours: commotion: turning-point.--v.t. to drive with the stream.--v.i. to pour a tide or flood: to work in or out of a river or harbour with the tide.--adj. T[=I]'DAL, pertaining to tides: flowing and ebbing periodically.--ns. TIDE'-GATE, a gate through which the water flows into a basin or dock with the tide, and which is shut to keep it from flowing out again when the tide ebbs: a place where the tide runs with great velocity; TIDE'-GAUGE, an instrument for registering the state of the tide continuously.--adj. TIDE'LESS, having no tides.--ns. TIDE'-LOCK, a lock placed between an entrance-basin and a harbour, canal, or river, and furnished with double gates, so that vessels can pass either out or in at all times of the tide; TIDE'MILL, a mill moved by tide-water: a mill for clearing lands of tide-water; TIDES'-MAN, TIDE'-WAIT'ER, an officer who waits the arrival of vessels, to secure the payment of the duties: one who watches public opinion before declaring his own; TIDE'-T[=A]'BLE, a table giving the time of high-tide at any place; TIDE'-WA'TER, the water of the portion of a river affected by the tide, the seaboard; TIDE'-WAVE, the great wave which follows the apparent motion of the moon; TIDE'-WAY, the channel in which the tide sets; NEAP'-TIDE (see Neap); SPRING'-TIDE (see SPRING).--TIDE OVER, to surmount difficulties, for the time at least, by favourable accidents or by skill. [A.S. tíd; Dut. tijd, Ger. zeit.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  33. See Alkaline. na
  34. Time, season, (now chiefly in even-t., Whitsunt., Christmast., yule-t., &c., otherwise archaic); period of time, as work double tt. (night& day); periodical rise (flood-t.) & fall (ebb-t.) of sea due to attraction of moon& sun, whence tidology n.; high, low, t., completion of flood, ebb, -t.; spring, neap, -t., maximum, minimum, t. when solar& lunar tt. act together, act 90° apart; LAG ging, PRIMING, of the tt.; meteorological t. (due to regular alternations of wind &c.); t.-gate (opened to admit water or let vessels pass during rising tide, closed to keep water in during ebb); t.-gauge (showing extremes or present level of t.); t.-lock (between tidal harbour& basin behind it); t.-rip (s), rough water caused by opposing tt.; tidewaiter, customs officer who boards ship on arrival to enforce customs regulations; t.-way, channel where t. runs, ebb or flow in such channel. Hence tideless a. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  35. Drift with tide, esp. work in or out of harbour with help of tide; get over (difficulty &c.), as t. over this business, t. it over. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  36. [A.S.] The periodical variations in the height of the surface of the sea at any given place depending on the relative position of the moon and in a less degree of the sun. The Tide-wave is the joint result due to the coexistence of the waves produced by the action of the sun and moon. Speaking with respect to the ocean generally, it is a very flat wave, with two crests about 180 of longitude apart : this is the Primary Tide ; the Derivative tides are those experienced near shore, in channels, rivers, etc., where the primary Tide is modified by the form of the channel and its bottom, and the movement of the water partakes of the nature of a current as well as of an oscillation. The Tide-day is the interval between two successive arrivals at the same place of the same crest of the tide, i.e. between one high tide and the next high tide but one. The Atmospheric Tide consists of elevations and depressions of the atmosphere analogous to those of the ocean tides, and produced in a like manner. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  37. n. [Anglo-Saxon, Swedish] Time ; season;- the alternate rising and falling of the waters of the ocean, and of bays, rivers, &c., connected therewith;- stream ; current;- tendency or direction of causes, influences, or events ; course ; sometimes favourable concurrence of causes or influences;- also, turning point ;-flow or current, as of blood;-among miners, a period of twelve, hours. Cabinet Dictionary

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