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Definitions of transparent

  1. so thin as to transmit light; "a hat with a diaphanous veil"; "filmy wings of a moth"; "gauzy clouds of dandelion down"; "gossamer cobwebs"; "sheer silk stockings"; "transparent chiffon"; "vaporous silks" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. transmitting light; able to be seen through with clarity; "the cold crystalline water of melted snow"; "crystal clear skies"; "could see the sand on the bottom of the limpid pool"; "lucid air"; "a pellucid brook"; "transparent cristal" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. free of deceit Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. easily understood or seen through (because of a lack of subtlety); "a transparent explanation"; "a transparent lie" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. Admitting the passage of light; open; porous; as, a transparent veil. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Having the property of transmitting rays of light, so that bodies can be distinctly seen through; pervious to light; diaphanous; pellucid; as, transparent glass; a transparent diamond; - opposed to opaque. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. Allowing rays of light to pass through, or capable of being easily seen through; easy to understand; frank. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. Noting a substance so permeable to light rays that objects may be seen through it. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  9. That may be distinctly seen through: clear. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. TRANSPARENTLY. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. TRANSPARENTNESS. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  12. Allowing objects to be seen through; clear. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  13. That can be seen through, as clear glass; easy to understand. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. Having the property of transmitting rays of light, and that objects may be distinctly seen through; pervious to light; clear. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  15. That may be seen through; opposite of opaque; clear; limpid. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  16. Having the property of transmitting rays of light, so that bodies can be distinctly seen through; pervious to light; diaphanous; pellucid; as, transparent glass; a transparent diamond; -- opposed to opaque. mso.anu.edu.au
  17. Having the property of transmitting rays of light, so that bodies can be distinctly seen through; pervious to light; diaphanous; pellucid; as, transparent glass; a transparent diamond; opposed to opaque. dictgcide_fs
  18. [Latin] Admitting the passage of light, so as to allow objects to be seen distinctly. na
  19. Transmitting rays of light without diffusion so that bodies behind can be distinctly seen; (fig., of disguise, pretext, &c.) easily seen through, (of motive, quality, &c.) easily seen through attempted disguise; bright, clear, (fig.) free from affectation or disguise, frank; t. colours, (in painting) such as when laid lightly on do not hide underlaying colours& forms, (in stained glass) appearing only by transmission of light. Hence transparently adv., transparentness n. [medieval Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
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