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Definitions of trespass

  1. To pass beyond; to enter unlawfully upon the land of another; to do any act that injures or annoys another; to intrude; to violate any known rule of duty. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To pass beyond a limit or boundary; hence, to depart; to go. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To commit a trespass; esp., to enter unlawfully upon the land of another. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To go too far; to put any one to inconvenience by demand or importunity; to intrude; as, to trespass upon the time or patience of another. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To commit any offense; sin; enter unlawfully upon the property of another; intrude. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  6. To pass over a limit or boundary: to enter unlawfully upon another's land: to inconvenience by importunity: to intrude: to injure or annoy another: to sin. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  7. To enter another's land unlawfully; intrude; sin. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  8. To pass the bounds of propriety or rectitude; err; sin. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  9. pass beyond; of limits and boundaries Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. commit a sin; violate a law of God or a moral law Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. break the law Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. Any injury or offence done to another. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Any voluntary transgression of the moral law; any violation of a known rule of duty; sin. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. An unlawful act committed with force and violence (vi et armis) on the person, property, or relative rights of another. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. An action for injuries accompanied with force. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To go upon the lands of another unlawfully; to pass over a limit or boundary; to violate any known rule of moral duty; to intrude; to go too far. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  17. entry to another's property without right or permission Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. a wrongful interference with the possession of property (personal property as well as realty), or the action instituted to recover damages Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. To commit any offense, or to do any act that injures or annoys another; to violate any rule of rectitude, to the injury of another; hence, in a moral sense, to transgress voluntarily any divine law or command; to violate any known rule of duty; to sin; -- often followed by against. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Any injury done to the person, rights, or property of another, transgression; sin. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. TRESPASSER. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. Act of trespassing; transgression. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. Any transgression of law or rule of duty; offense; sin. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. Any invasion of another's rights, as wrongful entry on another's land. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. An act of trespassing; transgression; any injury done to the person or property of another. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. Any wrong or damage done by one person to another; transgression generally; unlawful entry on the lands of another; a known violation entry on the lands of another; a known violation of the moral law; sin. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

Usage examples for trespass

  1. But I dare not trespass more on your space, or I could enlarge greatly on other singular facts. – The Truth About America by Edward Money
  2. But I had one other case of trespass of which it is now time to speak. – October Vagabonds by Richard Le Gallienne
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