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Definitions of trust

  1. have confidence or faith in; "We can trust in God"; "Rely on your friends"; "bank on your good education"; "I swear by my grandmother's recipes" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. be confident about something; "I believe that he will come back from the war" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a consortium of companies formed to limit competition; "they set up the trust in the hope of gaining a monopoly" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. To confer a trust upon; "The messenger was entrusted with the general's secret"; "I commit my soul to God" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a trustful relationship; "he took me into his confidence"; "he betrayed their trust" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. expect with desire; "I trust you will behave better from now on"; "I hope she understands that she cannot expect a raise" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. complete confidence in a person or plan etc; "he cherished the faith of a good woman"; "the doctor-patient relationship is based on trust" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. certainty based on past experience; "he wrote the paper with considerable reliance on the work of other scientists"; "he put more trust in his own two legs than in the gun" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. allow without fear Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. the trait of trusting; of believing in the honesty and reliability of others; "the experience destroyed his trust and personal dignity" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. something (as property) held by one party (the trustee) for the benefit of another (the beneficiary); "he is the beneficiary of a generous trust set up by his father" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. a consortium of independent organizations formed to limit competition by controlling the production and distribution of a product or service; "they set up the trust in the hope of gaining a monopoly" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. expect and wish; "I trust you will behave better from now on"; "I hope she understands that she cannot expect a raise" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. extend credit to Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. confer a trust upon; "The messenger was entrusted with the general's secret"; "I commit my soul to God" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. To believe. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. An equitable right or interest in property distinct from the legal ownership thereof; a use (as it existed before the Statute of Uses); also, a property interest held by one person for the benefit of another. Trusts are active, or special, express, implied, constructive, etc. In a passive trust the trustee simply has title to the trust property, while its control and management are in the beneficiary. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A business organization or combination consisting of a number of firms or corporations operating, and often united, under an agreement creating a trust (in sense 1), esp. one formed mainly for the purpose of regulating the supply and price of commodities, etc.; often, opprobriously, a combination formed for the purpose of controlling or monopolizing a trade, industry, or business, by doing acts in restraint or trade; as, a sugar trust. A trust may take the form of a corporation or of a body of persons or corporations acting together by mutual arrangement, as under a contract or a so-called gentlemen's agreement. When it consists of corporations it may be effected by putting a majority of their stock either in the hands of a board of trustees (whence the name trust for the combination) or by transferring a majority to a holding company. The advantages of a trust are partly due to the economies made possible in carrying on a large business, as well as the doing away with competition. In the United States severe statutes against trusts have been passed by the Federal government and in many States, with elaborate statutory definitions. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Assured resting of the mind on the integrity, veracity, justice, friendship, or other sound principle, of another person; confidence; reliance; reliance. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Credit given; especially, delivery of property or merchandise in reliance upon future payment; exchange without immediate receipt of an equivalent; as, to sell or buy goods on trust. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Assured anticipation; dependence upon something future or contingent, as if present or actual; hope; belief. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. That which is committed or intrusted to one; something received in confidence; charge; deposit. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. The condition or obligation of one to whom anything is confided; responsible charge or office. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. That upon which confidence is reposed; ground of reliance; hope. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. An estate devised or granted in confidence that the devisee or grantee shall convey it, or dispose of the profits, at the will, or for the benefit, of another; an estate held for the use of another; a confidence respecting property reposed in one person, who is termed the trustee, for the benefit of another, who is called the cestui que trust. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. An organization formed mainly for the purpose of regulating the supply and price of commodities, etc.; as, a sugar trust. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Held in trust; as, trust property; trustmoney. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To place confidence in; to rely on, to confide, or repose faith, in; as, we can not trust those who have deceived us. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To give credence to; to believe; to credit. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To hope confidently; to believe; - usually with a phrase or infinitive clause as the object. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. to show confidence in a person by intrusting (him) with something. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. To commit, as to one's care; to intrust. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. To give credit to; to sell to upon credit, or in confidence of future payment; as, merchants and manufacturers trust their customers annually with goods. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. To risk; to venture confidently. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. To have trust; to be credulous; to be won to confidence; to confide. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. To be confident, as of something future; to hope. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. To sell or deliver anything in reliance upon a promise of payment; to give credit. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons. Medical Dictionary DB
  39. Confidence; faith; belief in someone's truth and goodness; hope; basis of confidence or belief; credit granted because of belief in one's honesty; a duty or responsibility; a combination of business men or firms engaged in the production of some commodity or related group of commodities, designed to regulate the supply and price of their goods and to prosper by cooperation rather than by competition; often, such a combination formed to crush out smaller competitors formed to crush out smaller competitors and thus control an industry and raise prices; an estate left in someone's charge to be held and managed for another's charge to be held and managed for another's benefit; the guardianship of such an estate. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  40. To place confidence in; believe; entrust to someone's care; risk; sell upon credit to. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  41. To have confidence; to hope. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  42. Held in charge for someone else, as a fund. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  43. Truster. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  44. Confidence in the truth of anything: a resting on the integrity, friendship, etc., of another: faith: hope: credit (esp. sale on credit or on promise to pay): he or that which is the ground of confidence: that which is given or received in confidence: charge: (law) an estate managed for another. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  45. Held in trust. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  46. To place trust in: to believe: to give credit to: to sell upon credit: to commit to the care of. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  47. To be confident or confiding. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  48. Confidence; faith; credit given; charge; property held for another. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  49. To have confidence. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  50. To place trust in; believe; sell on credit to; commit to the charge of. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  51. To repose trust in. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  52. To commit to the care of another; entrust; confide. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  53. To sell on credit to. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  54. To place confidence; rely. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  55. To give credit. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  56. Confidence; faith. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  57. A charge or responsibility accepted. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  58. Credit, as for goods. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  59. A combination for the purpose of controlling production, prices, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  60. Confidence; a reliance or resting of the mind on the integrity, veracity, justice, friendship, or other sound principle of another; the ground of confidence; charge received in confidence; that which is entrusted; credit given without examination, or on promise of payment; special reliance on supposed honesty; care; management; an estate held for the use of another. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  61. To place confidence in; to believe; to intrust; to sell to upon credit. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  62. To be confident of something, present or future; to be credulous. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  63. A resting of the mind on the integrity, justice, or friendship of another; reliance; confidence; the person or thing that is the ground of confidence; credit given without examination; that which has been given or received in confidence; something committed to charge of which an account must be given; confidence in supposed honesty; credit given on a promise of payment; in law, an estate held by certain parties for the use of another; a turnpike road or district managed by commissioners. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  64. To rely on; to believe; to commit to the care of in confidence; to hope, as "I trust he will do well"; to be confident of something future; to sell to upon credit; to confide or have confidence in. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  65. To hope confidently; to believe; -- usually with a phrase or infinitive clause as the object. mso.anu.edu.au
  66. To hope confidently; to believe; usually with a phrase or infinitive clause as the object. dictgcide_fs
  67. trust, n. trustworthiness: confidence in the truth of anything: confident expectation: a resting on the integrity, friendship, &c. of another: faith: hope: credit (esp. sale on credit or on promise to pay): he who, or that which, is the ground of confidence: that which is given or received in confidence: charge: an arrangement by which property is handed to or vested in a person, in the trust or confidence that he will use and dispose of it for the benefit of another, also the estate so managed for another: in modern commerce, an arrangement for the control of several companies under one direction, to cheapen expenses, regulate production, beat down competition, and so obtain a maximum return.--adj. held in trust.--v.t. to place trust in: to believe: to give credit to: to sell upon credit: to commit to the care of: to expect confidently.--v.i. to be confident or confiding.--ns. TRUST'-DEED, a deed conveying property to a trustee; TRUSTEE', one to whom anything is entrusted: one to whom the management of a property is committed in trust for the benefit of others; TRUSTEE'SHIP; TRUST'ER; TRUST-ESTATE', an estate held by trustees.--adj. TRUST'FUL, trusting: worthy of trust.--adv. TRUST'FULLY.--n. TRUST'FULNESS.--adv. TRUST'ILY.--n. TRUST'INESS.--adj. TRUST'ING, confiding.--adv. TRUST'INGLY.--adj. TRUST'LESS, treacherous, unfaithful.--ns. TRUST'LESSNESS; TRUST'WORTHINESS.--adjs. TRUST'WORTHY, worthy of trust or confidence: trusty; TRUST'Y (comp. TRUST'IER, superl. TRUST'IEST), that may be trusted: deserving confidence: honest: strong: firm: (Shak.) involving trust.--ACTIVE, or SPECIAL, TRUST, a trust in which the trustee's power of management depends upon his having the right of actual possession; BREACH OF TRUST, a violation of duty by a trustee, executor, &c.; IN TRUST, as a charge, for safe-keeping; ON TRUST, on credit. [Scand., Ice. traust, trust; Ger. trost, consolation.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  68. Firm belief in the honesty, veracity, justice, strength, &c., of a person or thing, as our t. is in God,I repose considerable t. in him, put no t. in him; confident expectation (that); person, thing, confided in, as he is our sole t.; reliance on truth of statement &c. without examination, as takes everything on t.; commercial credit, as supplied with goods on t.; responsibility arising from confidence reposed in one, as am in a position of t.; (Law) confidence reposed in person by making him nominal owner of property to be used for another\'s benefit, right of the latter to benefit by such property, property so held, legal relation between holder& property so held, as have accepted a t., the property is merely a t., is held in t., (attrib.) t. money; thing, person, committed to one\'s care, resulting obligation, as would not desert his t., have fulfilled my t.; (Commerc.) organized association of several companies for purpose of defeating competition &c., the shareholders in each transferring all or most of the stock to central committee& losing their voting power while remaining entitled to profits; t. deed, deed by debtor conveying property to trustee for payment of his debts, deed conveying property to creditor to sell& pay himself& restore the residue, any instrument of conveyance that creates a t. (Vb) place t. in, believe in, rely on the character or behaviour of, as have never trusted him, if we may t. this account, do not t. him with (let him use) your typewriter, cat cannot be trusted with (will steal) milk, would t. him with untold gold, whence trustingly adv.; consign (thing to person &c.), place or leave (thing with person &c., in place &c.), without misgiving; allow credit to (customer for goods); entertain an earnest or (rarely) confident hope, as I t. he is not hurt (?), I t. to hear better news; place reliance in; t. to, place (esp. undue) reliance on, as we must t. to meeting someone who knows, does not do to t. to memory for these things. [Middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  69. n. [Icelandic, Gothic] Confidence; –reliance on the integrity; veracity, justice, friendship, or other sound principle of another; –credit given; delivery of property or merchandise in reliance upon future payment; –dependence upon something future or contingent, as if present or actual; –that which is committed or intrusted to one; –responsible charge or office; –that upon which confidence is reposed; ground of reliance; –an estate held for the use of another. Cabinet Dictionary

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