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Definitions of twist

  1. a hairdo formed by braiding or twisting the hair Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. an interpretation of a text or action; "they put an unsympathetic construction on his conduct" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. practice sophistry; change the meaning of or be vague about in order to mislead or deceive Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. any clever (deceptive) maneuver; "he would stoop to any device to win a point" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. form into a spiral shape; "The cord is all twisted" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a miniature whirlpool or whirlwind resulting when the current of a fluid doubles back on itself Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a sharp bend in a line produced when a line having a loop is pulled tight Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a sharp strain on muscles or ligaments; "the wrench to his knee occurred as he fell"; "he was sidelined with a hamstring pull" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. twist suddenly so as to sprain; "wrench one's ankle"; "The wrestler twisted his shoulder"; "the hikers sprained their ankles when they fell"; "I turned my ankle and couldn't walk for several days" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. the act of rotating rapidly; "he gave the crank a spin"; "it broke off after much twisting" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. turning or twisting around (in place); "with a quick twist of his head he surveyed the room" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. an unforeseen development; "events suddenly took an awkward turn" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. do the twist Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. the act of winding or twisting; "he put the key in the old clock and gave it a good wind" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. a jerky pulling movement Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. social dancing in which couples vigorously twist their hips and arms in time to the music; was popular in the 1960s; "they liked to dance the twist" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. form into twists; "Twist the bacon around the sausage" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. turn in the opposite direction; "twist a wire" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. cause (a plastic object) to assume a crooked or angular form; "bend the rod"; "twist the dough into a braid"; "the strong man could turn an iron bar" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. twist or pull violently or suddenly, especially so as to remove (something) from that to which it is attached or from where it originates; "wrench a window off its hinges"; "wrench oneself free from somebody's grip". Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. to move in a twisting or contorted motion, (especially when struggling); "The prisoner writhed in discomfort"; "The child tried to wriggle free from his aunt's embrace" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  22. Act of imparting a turning or twisting motion, as to a pitched ball; also, the motion thus imparted; as, the twist of a billiard ball. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To contort; to writhe; to complicate; to crook spirally; to convolve. Newage Dictionary DB
  24. Hence, to turn from the true form or meaning; to pervert; as, to twist a passage cited from an author. Newage Dictionary DB
  25. To distort, as a solid body, by turning one part relatively to another about an axis passing through both; to subject to torsion; as, to twist a shaft. Newage Dictionary DB
  26. To wreathe; to wind; to encircle; to unite by intertexture of parts. Newage Dictionary DB
  27. To wind into; to insinuate; -- used reflexively; as, avarice twists itself into all human concerns. Newage Dictionary DB
  28. To unite by winding one thread, strand, or other flexible substance, round another; to form by convolution, or winding separate things round each other; as, to twist yarn or thread. Newage Dictionary DB
  29. Hence, to form as if by winding one part around another; to wreathe; to make up. Newage Dictionary DB
  30. To form into a thread from many fine filaments; as, to twist wool or cotton. Newage Dictionary DB
  31. To be contorted; to writhe; to be distorted by torsion; to be united by winding round each other; to be or become twisted; as, some strands will twist more easily than others. Newage Dictionary DB
  32. To follow a helical or spiral course; to be in the form of a helix. Newage Dictionary DB
  33. The act of twisting; a contortion; a flexure; a convolution; a bending. Newage Dictionary DB
  34. The form given in twisting. Newage Dictionary DB
  35. That which is formed by twisting, convoluting, or uniting parts. Newage Dictionary DB
  36. A cord, thread, or anything flexible, formed by winding strands or separate things round each other. Newage Dictionary DB
  37. A kind of closely twisted, strong sewing silk, used by tailors, saddlers, and the like. Newage Dictionary DB
  38. A kind of cotton yarn, of several varieties. Newage Dictionary DB
  39. A roll of twisted dough, baked. Newage Dictionary DB
  40. A little twisted roll of tobacco. Newage Dictionary DB
  41. One of the threads of a warp, -- usually more tightly twisted than the filling. Newage Dictionary DB
  42. A material for gun barrels, consisting of iron and steel twisted and welded together; as, Damascus twist. Newage Dictionary DB
  43. The spiral course of the rifling of a gun barrel or a cannon. Newage Dictionary DB
  44. A beverage made of brandy and gin. Newage Dictionary DB
  45. A twig. Newage Dictionary DB
  46. A strong individual tendency, or bent; a marked inclination; a bias; - often implying a peculiar or unusual tendency; as, a twist toward fanaticism. Webster Dictionary DB
  47. To unite or form by winding two or more strands together; contort; distort; to wreathe; to twine or wind, as hair into a knot; to wrench or turn from a direct line. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  48. The act or manner of winding strands together, as certain kinds of thread; a wrench or turn, as of a muscle. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  49. Twister. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  50. To twine: to unite or form by winding together: to form from several threads: to encircle with something: to wreathe: to wind spirally: to turn from the true form or meaning: to insinuate. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  51. To be united by winding. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  52. That which is twisted: a cord: a single thread: manner of twisting: a contortion: a small roll of tobacco. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  53. Anything twisted; cord; contortion. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  54. To be twisted. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  55. To form by winding together; to wreathe; wind; writhe; contort. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  56. To wind (strands, etc.) round each other; intertwine. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  57. To give a spiral form or motion to. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  58. To distort; pervert; writhe. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  59. Anything made by twisting. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  60. The act or result of twisting. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  61. A cord, thread, or anything flexible, formed by winding strands or separate things round each other; a cord; a string; a contortion; a little roll of tobacco; manner of twisting. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  62. To unite by winding one thread, strand or other flexible substance round another; to form into a thread from many fine filaments; to contort; to writhe; to wreathe; to encircle; to unite by intertexture of parts; to enter by winding; to pervert; to turn from a straight line. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  63. To be contorted or united by winding round each other. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  64. To unite by winding one thread or other flexible substance round another; to form by winding separate things round each other; to encircle; to turn from a straight line; to be united by winding round each other. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  65. A cord, thread, or suchlike, formed by winding separate parts round each other; a contortion; silk in hanks, balls, or reels for sewing; a little roll of tobacco; an obliquity or peculiarity in intellect or disposition. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  66. To wind into; to insinuate; used reflexively; as, avarice twists itself into all human concerns. dictgcide_fs
  67. One of the threads of a warp, usually more tightly twisted than the filling. dictgcide_fs
  68. A strong individual tendency, or bent; a marked inclination; a bias; often implying a peculiar or unusual tendency; as, a twist toward fanaticism. dictgcide_fs
  69. twist, v.t. to twine: to unite or form by winding together: to form from several threads: to encircle with something: to wreathe: to wind spirally: to turn from the true form or meaning: to fabricate, compose: to cause to move spirally, to bend: to wrest, wrench: to insinuate.--v.i. to be united by winding: to be bent, to move spirally: to revolve: to writhe.--n. that which is twisted: a cord: a single thread: manner of twisting: a contortion: a small roll of tobacco: a strong silk thread: (obs.) coarse cloth: a wrench, strain: a peculiar bent, perversion: (slang) a mixed drink, also an appetite for food.--adjs. TWIST'ABLE; TWIST'ED.--n. TW[=I]ST'ER, one who, or that which, twists: a whirling wind, a tornado: the inner part, of the thigh of a rider on horseback: a ball, as in cricket, billiards, &c., sent with a twist.--v.t. TWIST'LE (Scot.), to twist.--n. a wrench.--TWIST OF THE WRIST, the turning movement of the wrist in any work requiring dexterity, any quick action. [A.S. twist, a rope--twí-, two; Ger. zwist, discord.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  70. Thread, rope, &c., made by winding two or more strands &c. about one another; kinds of strong silk thread& of cotton yarn; roll of bread, tobacco, &c. in form of t.; act of twisting, condition of being twisted, as give it a t., has a curious t., full of turns& tt.; manner or degree in which thing is twisted, e.g. inclination of rifle-grooves, whirling motion given to ball in cricket &c. to make it take special curve; peculiar tendency of mind, character, &c.; (Physics) twisting strain, (angle showing) amount of torsion of rod &c., forward motion combined with rotation about an axis; kinds of mixed drink, as gin t.; (colloq.) appetite, as had a tremendous t.; Damascus t., process of twisting Damascus iron to form gun-barrel; t. of the wrist, fig. dexterity, knack. (Vb) wind (strands &c.) one about another; form (rope &c.) thus; interweave (thing with or in with another); give spiral form to (rod, column, &c.) as by rotating the ends in opposite directions; receive, grow in, spiral form; cause (ball, esp. in billiards) to rotate while following curved path; twine (flowers &c. into garland &c.), make (garland &c.) thus; make one\'s way, make one\'s way, (through crowd &c., along, &c.) in winding manner; wrench out of natural shape, distort, as limbs twisted on the rack, features twisted with pain, (fig.) wants to t. my words into an admission of error. Hence twistable a. [Middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  71. Closely twisted strong sewing silk. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy

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