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Definitions of un

  1. an organization of independent states to promote international peace and security Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. an organization of independent states formed in 1945 to promote international peace and security Wordnet Dictionary DB
  3. An inseparable verbal prefix or particle. It is prefixed: (a) To verbs to express the contrary, and not the simple negative, of the action of the verb to which it is prefixed; as in uncoil, undo, unfold. (b) To nouns to form verbs expressing privation of the thing, quality, or state expressed by the noun, or separation from it; as in unchild, unsex. Sometimes particles and participial adjectives formed with this prefix coincide in form with compounds of the negative prefix un- (see 2d Un-); as in undone (from undo), meaning unfastened, ruined; and undone (from 2d un- and done) meaning not done, not finished. Un- is sometimes used with an intensive force merely; as in unloose. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. Un- is prefixed to adjectives, or to words used adjectively. Newage Dictionary DB
  5. To adjectives, to denote the absence of the quality designated by the adjective Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To past particles, or to adjectives formed after the analogy of past particles, to indicate the absence of the condition or state expressed by them Webster Dictionary DB
  7. Those which have acquired an opposed or contrary, instead of a merely negative, meaning; as, unfriendly, ungraceful, unpalatable, unquiet, and the like; or else an intensive sense more than a prefixed not would express; as, unending, unparalleled, undisciplined, undoubted, unsafe, and the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Those which have the value of independent words, inasmuch as the simple words are either not used at all, or are rarely, or at least much less frequently, used; as, unavoidable, unconscionable, undeniable, unspeakable, unprecedented, unruly, and the like; or inasmuch as they are used in a different sense from the usual meaning of the primitive, or especially in one of the significations of the latter; as, unaccountable, unalloyed, unbelieving, unpretending, unreserved, and the like; or inasmuch as they are so frequently and familiarly used that they are hardly felt to be of negative origin; as, uncertain, uneven, and the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Those which are anomalous, provincial, or, for some other reason, not desirable to be used, and are so indicated; as, unpure for impure, unsatisfaction for dissatisfaction, unexpressible for inexpressible, and the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Un- is prefixed to nouns to express the absence of, or the contrary of, that which the noun signifies; as, unbelief, unfaith, unhealth, unrest, untruth, and the like. Newage Dictionary DB
  11. is prefixed to adjectives, or to words used adjectively. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To present particles which come from intransitive verbs, or are themselves employed as adjectives, to mark the absence of the activity, disposition, or condition implied by the participle; as, - -- and the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. is prefixed to nouns to express the absence of, or the contrary of, that which the noun signifies; as, unbelief, unfaith, unhealth, unrest, untruth, and the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. An international organization whose members include most of the sovereign nations of the world with headquarters in New York City. The primary objectives of the organization are to maintain peace and security and to achieve international cooperation in solving international economic, social, cultural, or humanitarian problems. Medical Dictionary DB
  15. A prefix meaning not; also expressing undoing of the action or condition implied in the word: used before almost any adjective, participle, or adverb, thus forming a large number of words, of which only the most important are here included. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. A negative prefix, signifying not, or the want of, which may be attached to nouns, adjectives, adverbs, verbs, and participles. When applied to nouns, adjectives, or participles when used adjectively, it usually denotes the absence of the state, quality, or condition expressed by the simple word, as unhappiness, unhappy, unfeeling, unarmed. When applied to adverbs, it denotes the negation of the modification expressed by the adverb, as unhappily. Applied to transitive verbs, or their participles, it usually denotes an undoing or reversal of the action expressed by the simple word, as unbind, unlock. Words beginning with un-, not found below, may be explained by adding not, or want of, to the simple word, or as indicated above. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  17. Not; used to express negation, incompleteness, or opposition. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. Back; used to express the reversal of the action of the verb. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  19. A Saxon prefix signifying not before nouns or adjectives, and the reversal of the action or its undoing before verbs. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  20. Those which have the value of independent words, inasmuch as the simple words are either not used at all, or are rarely, or at least much less frequently, used; as, unavoidable, unconscionable, undeniable, unspeakable, unprecedented, unruly, and the like; Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A prefix signifying "not"; the opposite of; un, signifying "not," or "the opposite of," may be used before almost any adjective, as in unfruitful, the opposite of fruitful; before nouns derived from adjectives, as in unfruitfulness, the opposite of fruitfulness, and before adverbs, as in unfruitfully; un before a verb signifies "to take off"; to deprive of; to undo; to destroy,-as in undress, to take off dress. Note.-Those words only are given which are in most general use; when not found, turn to the word, less the prefix un, or to the primary word, for further explanations and the roots.Un is equivalent to the Latin prefix in when it signifies not. In the use of un or in before adjectives, usage has greatly varied. As to when it is proper, according to the best usage, to write un or in, the best guide is to consult the dictionary. In many cases both in and un are in good use as prefixes for the same word, and are used indifferently, some writers preferring un and others in. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  22. (colloq.). One, as that\'s a good \'un, he\'s a tough \'un, stiff-\'uns\' race. Concise Oxford Dictionary

What are the misspellings for un?

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