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Definitions of under

  1. Denoting relation to something that exceeds in rank or degree, in number, size, weight, age, or the like; in a relation of the less to the greater, of inferiority, or of falling short. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. Less specifically, denoting the relation of being subject, of undergoing regard, treatment, or the like; as, a bill under discussion. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. Denoting relation to something that comprehends or includes, that represents or designates, that furnishes a cover, pretext, pretense, or the like; as, he betrayed him under the guise of friendship. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. Beneath or below; oppressed or weighed down by; beneath, as acted upon by something; as, to be under treatment for a disease; inferior to; for less than; as, to sell goods under the market price. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  5. In a lower position than: beneath: below: less than: in subjection, subordination, oppression, liability, etc.: during the time of: undergoing. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  6. Beneath; covered by. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7. In a place lower than. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  8. Subject to. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  9. Less than. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  10. By virtue of; in conformity to; in accordance with; authorized, attested, or warranted by. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  11. Beneath; below; in a state of pupilage or subjection to; less than; for less than; in a degree inferior to; with the pretence of; in a state of oppression; during the time of; attested or signed by; in subordination to. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  12. Beneath or below, so as to have something over or above; in a state of subjection to; less than; by the show or pretence of, as under the disguise of a friend; denoting rank or order of precedence, as, none were present under the rank of a baron; in a state of oppression by; in the state of being known by; in the state of; attested by, as under his own hand. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  13. down below; "get under quickly!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. below the horizon; "the sun went under" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. below some quantity or limit; "fifty dollars or under" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. in or into a state of subordination or subjugation; "we must keep our disappointment under" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. down to defeat, death, or ruin; "their competitors went under" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. into unconsciousness; "this will put the patient under" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. through a range downward; "children six and under will be admitted free" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. Denoting relation to some thing or person that is superior, weighs upon, oppresses, bows down, governs, directs, influences powerfully, or the like, in a relation of subjection, subordination, obligation, liability, or the like; as, to travel under a heavy load; to live under extreme oppression; to have fortitude under the evils of life; to have patience under pain, or under misfortunes; to behave like a Christian under reproaches and injuries; under the pains and penalties of the law; the condition under which one enters upon an office; under the necessity of obeying the laws; under vows of chastity. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. In a lower, subject, or subordinate condition; in subjection; - used chiefly in a few idiomatic phrases; as, to bring under, to reduce to subjection; to subdue; to keep under, to keep in subjection; to control; to go under, to be unsuccessful; to fail. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Below; in a lower state or position. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. Lower in degree, rank, or position: usually in compound words, as under-officer, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. In a lower degree or condition: in subjection: below: less. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  25. Beneath; below; less than; during the time of. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  26. In a lower degree; below; less. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  27. Lower in position or degree; subordinate; inferior. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  28. In a lower position or inferior degree. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. In a lower or subordinate condition; in subjection. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  30. A prefix signifying "that which is less than right or ordinary"; that which is inferior or subordinate to something else; lower in rank or degree. Note.-All the possible compounds of under are not given, but only those which are most common. The roots of the compounds of under may be ascertained by consulting the dictionary for the separate parts. Under is not usually separated by a hyphen, and is sometimes prepositional, as underground, and sometimes adverbial, as underdone. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. lower in rank, power, or authority; "an under secretary" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  32. Lower in position, intensity, rank, or degree; subject; subordinate; - generally in composition with a noun, and written with or without the hyphen; as, an undercurrent; undertone; underdose; under-garment; underofficer; undersheriff. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. Lower in position, rank, or degree: subject: subordinate. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  34. Lower or lowermost. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. Lower in degree; subordinate. To keep under, to hold in subjection. Under way, in a condition to make progress. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  36. Lower in rank or degree; subordinate; to knock under, to yield; to submit. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for under?

Usage examples for under

  1. He lived like the old Bradlaugh, and he went under – Reminiscences of Charles Bradlaugh by George W. Foote
  2. I thought you would be glad to know that we expect to be under way again early in the morning. – Bring Me His Ears by Clarence E. Mulford
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