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Definitions of value

  1. place a value on; judge the worth of something; "I will have the family jewels appraised by a professional" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. hold dear; "I prize these old photographs" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the amount (of money or goods or services) that is considered to be a fair equivalent for something else; "he tried to estimate the value of the produce at normal prices" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. (music) the relative duration of a musical note Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. relative darkness or lightness of a color; "I establish the colors and principal values by organizing the painting into three values--dark, medium...and light"-Joe Hing Lowe Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. the quality (positive or negative) that renders something desirable or valuable; "the Shakespearean Shylock is of dubious value in the modern world" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a numerical quantity measured or assigned or computed; "the value assigned was 16 milliseconds" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. an ideal accepted by some individual or group; "he has old-fashioned values" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. fix or determine the value of; assign a value to, as of jewelry or art work Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. estimate the value of; "How would you rate his chances to become President?"; "Gold was rated highly among the Romans" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. look on as or consider; "she looked on this affair as a joke"; "He thinks of himself as a brilliant musician"; "He is reputed to be intelligent" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. regard highly; think much of; "I respect his judgement"; "We prize his creativity" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. fix or determine the value of; assign a value to; "value the jewelry and art work in the estate" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. That property of a color by which it is distinguished as bright or dark; luminosity. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Degree of lightness as conditioned by the presence of white or pale color, or their opposites. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Any particular quantitative determination; as, a function's value for some special value of its argument. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. The valuable ingredients to be obtained by treatment from any mass or compound; specif., the precious metals contained in rock, gravel, or the like; as, the vein carries good values; the values on the hanging walls. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. The property or aggregate properties of a thing by which it is rendered useful or desirable, or the degree of such property or sum of properties; worth; excellence; utility; importance. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Worth estimated by any standard of purchasing power, especially by the market price, or the amount of money agreed upon as an equivalent to the utility and cost of anything. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Precise signification; import; as, the value of a word; the value of a legal instrument Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Esteem; regard. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. Valor. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To estimate the value, or worth, of; to rate at a certain price; to appraise; to reckon with respect to number, power, importance, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To rate highly; to have in high esteem; to hold in respect and estimation; to appreciate; to prize; as, to value one for his works or his virtues. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To raise to estimation; to cause to have value, either real or apparent; to enhance in value. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To be worth; to be equal to in value. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. The relative length or duration of a tone or note, answering to quantity in prosody; thus, a quarter note [] has the value of two eighth notes []. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. In an artistical composition, the character of any one part in its relation to other parts and to the whole; - often used in the plural; as, the values are well given, or well maintained. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. Worth; that which makes anything worth possessing; exact meaning; as, to grasp the value of each word; estimated worth; purchasing power; market price; fair price. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. To estimate the worth of; put a price on; esteem highly; hold dear. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. Valuer. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  32. Valued. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. Valuing. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  34. Worth: that which renders anything useful or estimable: the degree of this quality: efficacy: importance: excellence: price: precise meaning. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. To estimate the worth of: to rate at a price: to esteem: to prize. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. To estimate the worth of; rate at a price; esteem; prize. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  37. Worth; price; excellence. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  38. To estimate; appraise; esteem; prize. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. Intrinsic worth; utility. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. The market price. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. That property or those properties of a thing which render it useful or estimable; price; worth; high rate; importance; efficacy in producing effects; import; precise signification. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. To estimate the worth of; to rate at a certain price; to rate at a high price; to have in high esteem; to esteem; to take account of; to reckon at. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  43. Worth as estimated by some rate or standard; excellence; usefulness; efficacy in producing results. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. To rate or estimate at a certain price; to have in high esteem; to prize. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  45. The utility of an object in satisfying, directly or indirectly, the needs or desires of human beings, called by economists "value in use;" or its worth consisting in the power of purchasing other objects, called "value in exchange." Also the estimated or appraised worth of any object of property, calculated in money. The term is also often used as an abbreviation for "valuable consideration," especially in the phrases "purchaser for value," "holder for value," etc. thelawdictionary.org
  46. In an artistical composition, the character of any one part in its relation to other parts and to the whole; -- often used in the plural; as, the values are well given, or well maintained. mso.anu.edu.au
  47. The relative length or duration of a tone or note, answering to quantity in prosody; thus, a quarter note [value of two eighth notes [ dictgcide_fs
  48. In an artistical composition, the character of any one part in its relation to other parts and to the whole; often used in the plural; as, the values are well given, or well maintained. dictgcide_fs
  49. val'[=u], n. worth: that which renders anything useful or estimable: the degree of this quality: esteem, regard: efficacy: importance: excellence: price: precise meaning: (mus.) the relative length of a tone signified by a note: (paint.) relation of one part of a picture to the others with reference to light and shade and without reference to hue: (math.) the special determination of a quantity.--v.t. to estimate the worth of: to rate at a price: to esteem: to prize.--v.i. (Shak.) to be worth.--adj. VAL'UABLE, having value or worth: costly: deserving esteem.--n. a thing of value, a choice article--often in pl.--ns. VAL'UABLENESS; VALU[=A]'TION, the act of valuing: value set upon a thing: estimated worth; VALU[=A]'TOR, one who sets a value upon: an appraiser.--adjs. VAL'UED; VAL'UELESS.--n. VAL'UER, one who values.--VALUE IN EXCHANGE, exchange value: (pol. econ.) economic value (i.e. the amount of other commodities for which a thing can be exchanged in open market) as distinguished from its more general meaning of utility; VALUE RECEIVED, a phrase indicating that a bill of exchange, &c., has been accepted for a valuable consideration.--GOOD VALUE, full worth in exchange. [O. Fr. value, prop. the fem. of Fr. valu, pa.p. of valoir, to be worth--L. val[=e]re.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  50. Worth, desirabilitiy, utility, qualities on which these depend, as now learnt the v. of fresh water, a. friend, quinine, accuracy, regular exercise; worth as estimated, valuation, as sets a high v. on his time; commercial, economic, exchange (able) v., v. in exchange, purchasing power, power of a commodity to purchase others, amount of (pop.) money or (Polishecon.) other commodities for which thing can be exchanged in open market; FACE, SURRENDER, v.; surplus v., surplus production of labour after subsistence of labourer& family; the equivalent of a thing, what represents or is represented by or may be substituted for a thing, as v. received (see BILL of exchange), got good v. for (something well worth) his money, paid him the v. of his lost property, the precise v. (meaning) of a word, acute accent has not always the same v., give the note (in music) its full time-v. (the full time indicated by it); (Paint.) relation of one part of picture to others in respect of light& shade, as out of v., too light or dark; amount, quantity, denoted by algebraical term or expression; (Biol.) rank in classification. (Vb) estimate the v. of, appraise (professionally, whence valuer n., or otherwise), as should v. the whole at £2000; have high or specified opinion of, attach importance to, prize, esteem, appreciate, pride oneself on, as v. sincerity (beyond all things), a valued friend, values himself on his conversational powers, do not v. that a brass farthing. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  51. n. [French Latin]. Worth; the property or properties of a thing which render it useful; or the degree of such property or properties; utility; price;—rate or estimated worth; amount obtainable in exchange for a thing; equivalent importance; efficacy in producing effects ;—import; precise signification;—account; estimation ;—high rate or estimation. Cabinet Dictionary

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