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Definitions of verge

  1. To tend downward; to bend; to slope; to incline; to approach. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To border upon; to tend; to incline; to come near; to approach. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To tend downward; to bend; to slope; as, a hill verges to the north. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To be on the edge or border: with on; to tend; to incline. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  5. To tend towards; border on. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  6. To approach; border; followed by on or upon. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7. border on; come close to; "His behavior verges on the criminal" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. To tend downwards; to tend; to approach. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  9. a region marking a boundary Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. (British) a grass border along a road Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a grass border along a road Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. A rod or staff, carried as an emblem of authority; as, the verge, carried before a dean. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. The stick or wand with which persons were formerly admitted tenants, they holding it in the hand, and swearing fealty to the lord. Such tenants were called tenants by the verge. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. A virgate; a yardland. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A border, limit, or boundary of a space; an edge, margin, or brink of something definite in extent. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A circumference; a circle; a ring. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. The shaft of a column, or a small ornamental shaft. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. The edge of the tiling projecting over the gable of a roof. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. The spindle of a watch balance, especially one with pallets, as in the old vertical escapement. See under Escapement. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. The edge or outside of a bed or border. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A slip of grass adjoining gravel walks, and dividing them from the borders in a parterre. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. The external male organ of certain mollusks, worms, etc. See Illustration in Appendix. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. The compass of the court of Marshalsea and the Palace court, within which the lord steward and the marshal of the king's household had special jurisdiction; - so called from the verge, or staff, which the marshal bore. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. A rod or staff carried as a sign of authority; a limit or boundary; an extreme edge; as, the verge of a precipice. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. A slender green branch, a twig: a rod, staff, or mace, or anything like them, used as an emblem of authority: extent of jurisdiction (esp. of the lord-steward of a royal household.). The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  26. The extreme edge; margin. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. A rod or staff. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. A rod, or something in the form of a rod or staff, carried as an emblem of authority; the mace of a church functionary; a small shaft; the compass or extent of the king's court; compass; range; spindle in a watch. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. Brink; border; margin; grass edging of a walk. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. A rod, wand, or mace; a French name for the Eng. yard-measure; the verge of a court-that is, the limits within which the authority of the officers extended; the extreme side or end of anything; edge; utmost border; margin; in a watch, the balance-wheel, distinguished from the others by the absence of cogs. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for verge?

Usage examples for verge

  1. The troop mounted, and a few minutes later we were galloping over a wide plain, on the eastern verge of which the light of the new day was slowly dawning. – In the Track of the Troops by R.M. Ballantyne
  2. He bore his defeat bravely, however, although all his schemes were thus dashed to the ground when they were trembling on the verge of success. – Caught in a Trap by John C. Hutcheson
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