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Definitions of very

  1. being the exact same one; not any other:; "this is the identical room we stayed in before"; "the themes of his stories are one and the same"; "saw the selfsame quotation in two newspapers"; "on this very spot"; "the very thing he said yesterday"; "the very man I want to see" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  2. used as intensifiers; `real' is sometimes used informally for `really'; `rattling' is informal; "she was very gifted"; "he played very well"; "a really enjoyable evening"; "I'm real sorry about it"; "a rattling good yarn" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. precisely so; "on the very next page"; "he expected the very opposite" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. used to give emphasis; "the very essence of artistic expression is invention"- Irving R. Kaufman; "the very back of the room" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. used to give emphasis to the relevance of the thing modified; "his very name struck terror"; "caught in the very act" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. precisely as stated; "the very center of town" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. Alt. of night signals Webster Dictionary DB
  8. True; real; actual; veritable. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. In a high degree; to no small extent; exceedingly; excessively; extremely; as, a very great mountain; a very bright sum; a very cold day; the river flows very rapidly; he was very much hurt. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Absolute; complete; utter; as, that is the very truth: especial; as, his very own; the same; as, that is the very one; for emphasis, equivalent to even the; as, the very thought frightens me. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. In a high degree; extremely. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. Verier. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  13. Veriest. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. True: real (so in B.): actual. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  15. In a great degree. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. Real; actual; true; same. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. Real; true. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  18. In a great, eminent, or high degree, but not generally the highest. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  19. True; real; complete; perfect. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  20. In a great or eminent degree. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  21. In a high degree; to no small extent; exceedingly; excessively; extremely; as, a very great mountain; a very bright sun; a very cold day; the river flows very rapidly; he was very much hurt. dictgcide_fs
  22. ver'i, adj. true (now used chiefly in an intensive sense): real (so in B.): actual--sometimes used in superlative form VER'IEST.--adv. in a high degree.--IN VERY DEED, of a truth, certainly. [Older form veray--O. Fr. verai (Fr. vrai), from L. verax, veracis, speaking truly--verus, true; cf. Ger. wahr.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  23. Real, true, genuine, that is such in the truest or fullest sense, as v. God of v. God, has shown himself a v. knave, the veriest simpleton knows that, must consent from v. shame, (somewhat archaic exc. in foll. uses); (with the, this, that, or possessive adj., emphasizing identity, coincidence, significance, or extreme degree) this is the v. spot I found it on, speaking in this v. room, the v. fact of his presence is enough, you are the v. man I am looking for, a needle is the v. thing (for our purpose), come here this v. minute, grieves me to the v. heart, the v. stones cry out, his v. servants bully him, drank it to the v. dregs; (with a) a v. little more will do, give me only a v. little; (adv., perh. orig. adj., with superl. adj. often abs., or with my &c. own) in the fullest sense, as drank it to the v. last drop, the v. last thing I expected, did the v. best I could, did my v. utmost, may keep it for your v. own; (adv.: used with adv v. & non-verbal adjj.; with part t. established as independent adjj., as av. dazzling effect, effect was v. dazzling, a v. trying time; with p. pp. in attrib. use applied to what is not the real object of the vbl action, as wore a v. pained, pleased, puzzled, troubled, vexed, annoyed, surprised, &c., expression, but not his expression was v. pained &c.; & colloq. with the same p. pp. in pred. use applied to the true object& fulfilling purely vbl function, as I was v. pleased, surprised, annoyed, &c.; not otherwise used with vbs) in a high degree, as that is v. easily done, v. often fails, v. easy, not v. much use, find v. few instances, gives v. little trouble. [Middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  24. adv. In a high degree; to no small extent; exceedingly; excessively. Cabinet Dictionary

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