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Definitions of vice

  1. To hold or squeeze with a vice, or as if with a vice. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. In the place of; in the stead; as, A. B. was appointed postmaster vice C. D. resigned. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. Denoting one who in certain cases may assume the office or duties of a superior; designating an officer or an office that is second in rank or authority; as, vice president; vice agent; vice consul, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. Instead of; in the place of. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  5. Substitute; subordinate; sub-; second. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. Denoting one who acts in place of another; denoting one who is second in authority, but holding the same title; denoting the office itself, as vice-admiral, vice-chancellor, vice-president, &c. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  7. A defect; a fault; an error; a blemish; an imperfection; as, the vices of a political constitution; the vices of a horse. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A moral fault or failing; especially, immoral conduct or habit, as in the indulgence of degrading appetites; customary deviation in a single respect, or in general, from a right standard, implying a defect of natural character, or the result of training and habits; a harmful custom; immorality; depravity; wickedness; as, a life of vice; the vice of intemperance. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. The buffoon of the old English moralities, or moral dramas, having the name sometimes of one vice, sometimes of another, or of Vice itself; -- called also Iniquity. Newage Dictionary DB
  10. A kind of instrument for holding work, as in filing. Same as Vise. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. A tool for drawing lead into cames, or flat grooved rods, for casements. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A gripe or grasp. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. The buffoon of the old English moralities, or moral dramas, having the name sometimes of one vice, sometimes of another, or of itself; - called also Iniquity. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. A fault, defect, or blemish; an immoral practice or habit; abandonment to evil; immorality; an instrument used to hold things firmly in two jaws tightened by a screw; also spelled vise. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. An iron or wooden screw press, fixed to the edge of a workboard, for holding anything tightly while being filed, etc. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  16. A blemish or fault: immoral conduct: depravity of manners: a bad trick or habit in a horse. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. A fault; immoral act immorality. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  18. Clamp with two jaws, closing by a screw. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  19. Depravity; gross immorality. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  20. A bad trick, as of a horse. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  21. Same as VISE. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. A defect, fault, blemish, or imperfection; any voluntary action or course of conduct which deviates from the rules of moral rectitude; depravity of manners; a fault or bad trick in a horse. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  23. An iron or wooden press with a screw, for holding articles fast when filed, &c. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. Used as a separate word before a proper name, and means in the place of, as B vice C resigned-that is, B in the place of C, who has resigned. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  25. A small iron or wooden press tightened by a screw, used for holding fast an object on which a person is at work, as in the process of filing, &c. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  26. A blemish; an imperfection; depravity or corruption of conduct; the opposite of virtue; a fault or bad trick in horses. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. Entitled to fill an office in the absence of its holder; as, vice president; denoting the office of one so entitled; second in rank; as, vice admiral. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. A Latin prefix signifying second in rank, or acting in the place of. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.

What are the misspellings for vice?

Usage examples for vice

  1. Come with me, my boy, and you shall see what vice is; and after that, if you care to try it, please yourself, for I shall have nothing more to say!" – Whosoever Shall Offend by F. Marion Crawford
  2. Then, as second President, the people chose John Adams, who had already been Vice President. – This Country Of Ours by H. E. Marshall Author: Henrietta Elizabeth Marshall
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