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Definitions of view

  1. To see; to behold; especially, to look at with attention, or for the purpose of examining; to examine with the eye; to inspect; to explore. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To survey or examine mentally; to consider; as, to view the subject in all its aspects. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To see; gaze at; survey; consider closely and with care. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  4. To see: to look at attentively: to examine intellectually. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  5. To see; look at; examine; consider. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  6. To look at scrutinizingly; inspect; see. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7. To survey; to examine with the eye; to look on with attention; to perceive by the eye; to survey intellectually; to consider. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  8. To examine with the eye; to look on with attention; to consider. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  9. the range of the eye; "they were soon out of view" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a message expressing a belief about something; "his opinions appeared frequently on the editorial page" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. graphic art consisting of the graphic or photographic representation of a visual percept; "he painted scenes from everyday life"; "figure 2 shows photographic and schematic views of the equipment" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. the act of looking or seeing or observing; "he tried to get a better view of it"; "his survey of the battlefield was limited" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. outward appearance; "they look the same in outward view" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. the phrase"with a view to" means"with the intention of"; "he took the computer with a view to pawning it" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. purpose; the phrase `with a view to' means `with the intention of' or `for the purpose of'; "he took the computer with a view to pawning it" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. a message expressing a belief about something; the expression of a belief that is held with confidence but not substantiated by positive knowledge or proof; "his opinions appeared frequently on the editorial page" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. deem to be; "She views this quite differently from me"; "I consider her to be shallow"; "I don't see the situation quite as negatively as you do" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. Mental survey; intellectual perception or examination; as, a just view of the arguments or facts in a case. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Power of seeing, either physically or mentally; reach or range of sight; extent of prospect. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. That which is seen or beheld; sight presented to the natural or intellectual eye; scene; prospect; as, the view from a window. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Mode of looking at anything; manner of apprehension; conception; opinion; judgment; as, to state one's views of the policy which ought to be pursued. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. That which is looked towards, or kept in sight, as object, aim, intention, purpose, design; as, he did it with a view of escaping. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. The pictorial representation of a scene; a sketch, ither drawn or painted; as, a fine view of Lake George. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. The act of seeing; sight; a scene; objects, extent of landscape, etc., within sight; as, an extended view from the window; range of mental perception; outlook, physical or mental; a picture of a scene or person looked at from a given direction; way of looking at anything mentally; opinion; as, he held advanced views; regard or consideration. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. Viewer. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. A seeing: sight: reach of the sight: whole extent seen: that which is seen: direction in which a thing is seen: the picture of a scene: a sketch: mental survey: mode of looking at or receiving: opinion: intention. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. Sight; anything seen; prospect; picture; survey; mode of looking at; opinion; intention. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  28. The act of viewing; survey; examination. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. Range of vision. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. A spectacle; landscape. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. Intention; opinion; motion. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. Prospect; reach of the eye; the whole extent seen; sight; power of seeing or limit of sight; intellectual or mental sight; act of seeing; eye; survey; intellectual survey; mental examination; appearance; display; prospect of interest; intention: purpose; design; opinion; manner of understanding. Point of view, the direction in which a thing is seen; standpoint.. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  33. Sight; vision; the whole extent seen; reach of sight; survey; a sketch or design; examination; aim; manner of seeing or understanding; a pictorial sketch. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

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Usage examples for view

  1. But I cannot help seeing their point of view – The Complete PG Edition of The Works of Winston Churchill by Winston Churchill
  2. " Oh, from that point of view began the detective. – A Mysterious Disappearance by Gordon Holmes
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