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Definitions of villain

  1. the principle bad character in a film or work of fiction Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a wicked or evil person; someone who does evil deliberately Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. Villainous. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. One who holds lands by a base, or servile, tenure, or in villenage; a feudal tenant of the lowest class, a bondman or servant. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. A baseborn or clownish person; a boor. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. A vile, wicked person; a man extremely depraved, and capable or guilty of great crimes; a deliberate scoundrel; a knave; a rascal; a scamp. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To debase; to degrade. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. One capable of great wickedness; a cirminal; a rascal; under the feudal system, a serf: usually spelled villein; in drama, the evilly disposed person who makes trouble for the hero. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. A wicked wretch: a man extremely degraded: a deliberate scoundrel. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. Feudal tenant attached to a farm; a depraved person; scoundrel; ruffian. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  11. A basely wicked person; scoundrel. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. Formerly a serf; farm - servant. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. A vile, wicked person; a man extremely depraved, and capable or guilty of great crimes; one who holds lands by a base or servile tenure. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  14. A vile, wicked person; a man extremely degraded or depraved, and capable or guilty of great wickedness. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  15. An opprobrious epithet, Implying great moral delinquency, and equivalent to knave, rascal, or scoundrel. The word is libelous. 1 Bos. & P. 331. thelawdictionary.org
  16. vil'[=a]n, or vil'in, n. a wicked wretch: a man extremely degraded: in feudal times, a member of the lowest class of unfree persons.--ns. VILL'AIN[=A]GE, VILL'AN[=A]GE, VILL'EIN[=A]GE, VILL'EN[=A]GE, in feudal times, the tenure of land by villein, i.e. base or menial services.--adj. VILL'AINOUS, like or suited to a villain: depraved: proceeding from extreme depravity: very bad, mean, vile.--adv. VILL'AINOUSLY.--ns. VILL'AINOUSNESS; VILL'AINY, the act of a villain: extreme depravity: an atrocious crime. [Orig. 'a serf attached to a farm,' O. Fr. villain--Low L. villanus--L. villa.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  17. Person guiity or capable of great wickedness, scoundrel, as has played the v., plays the vv. in melodramas, (colloq., playfull) you little &c. v. (rascal); (archaic) rustic, boor; (hist., also villein a. & n.) feudal serf, tenant holding by menial services, so villa (i)nage, -e (i)nage, n.; (adj.) of, done by, a v., as v. services. [Middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  18. n. [French, Latin] A feudal tenant of the lowest class; a bondman or servant; — a vile, wicked person ; a deliberate scoundrel; a designing rascal:—also villein. Cabinet Dictionary

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