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Definitions of void

  1. To cause to be empty; to vacate; to send or throw out; to discahrge; to annul or cance, as a law. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  2. To make vacant: to quit: to send out: to render of no effect. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  3. To vacate; quit; expel; annul. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  4. To render null; annul. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  5. To send out; emit; evacuate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. To be emitted or evacuated. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  7. declare invalid; "The contract was annulled"; "avoid a plea" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. clear (a room, house, place) of occupants or empty or clear (a place, receptacle, etc.) of something; "The chemist voided the glass bottle"; "The concert hall was voided of the audience" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. To quit; to leave; to evacuate; to render of no validity or effect; to make or leave vacant. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  10. To leave empty; to empty; to vacate; to evacuate or be evacuated; to send out; to render of no effect. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  11. An empty space; a vacuum. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  12. A vacuum; an empty space. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  13. An empty space. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  14. A vacuum; emptiness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. containing nothing; "the earth was without form, and void" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. lacking any legal or binding force; "null and void" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. Containing nothing; empty; vacant; not occupied; not filled. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Being without; destitute; free; wanting; devoid; as, void of learning, or of common use. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Not producing any effect; ineffectual; vain. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Containing no immaterial quality; destitute of mind or soul. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To remove the contents of; to make or leave vacant or empty; to quit; to leave; as, to void a table. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To throw or send out; to evacuate; to emit; to discharge; as, to void excrements. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To render void; to make to be of no validity or effect; to vacate; to annul; to nullify. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Having no incumbent; unoccupied; - said of offices and the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. Empty; vacant; lacking: with of; without result; in vain; useless; as, all their efforts were void; unfilled, as an office; in law, having no force; null. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. Voidable. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. Unoccupied: empty (so in B.): having no binding force: wanting: unsubstantial. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. Empty; destitute; null; unsubstantial. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  29. Vacant; empty; unoccupied; destitute; clear. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. Not occupied with any visible matter; empty; vacant; without inhabitants or furniture; having no legal or binding force; free; clear, destitute; having no incumbent; unsubstantial; vain. Void space, a vacuum To make void, to render useless or of no effect. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.

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Usage examples for void

  1. In reply, General Jackson said he had fought for the people of Georgia; that the land belonged to them and to their children; and that, should the conspirators succeed, he, for one, would hold the sale to be void – Stories Of Georgia 1896 by Joel Chandler Harris
  2. That resource is almost void at present; nevertheless, this house being more spacious than the old one, the prices of admission higher, and the performance, perhaps, more constantly attended, the money taken at the door cannot well be less than it was formerly. – Paris As It Was and As It Is by Francis W. Blagdon
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