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Definitions of void

  1. declare invalid; "The contract was annulled"; "avoid a plea" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. an empty area or space; "the huge desert voids"; "the emptiness of outer space" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. excrete or discharge from the body Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. the state of nonexistence Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. (law) lacking any legal or binding force; "null and void" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. containing nothing; "the earth was without form, and void" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. clear (a room, house, place) of occupants or empty or clear (a place, receptacle, etc.) of something; "The chemist voided the glass bottle"; "The concert hall was voided of the audience" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. an empty area or space; "the huge desert voids"; "the emptiness of outer space"; "without their support he'll be ruling in a vacuum" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. take away the legal force of or render ineffective; "invalidate as a contract" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. declare invalid; "The contract was annulled"; "void a plea" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. lacking any legal or binding force; "null and void" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. Containing nothing; empty; vacant; not occupied; not filled. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Being without; destitute; free; wanting; devoid; as, void of learning, or of common use. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Not producing any effect; ineffectual; vain. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Containing no immaterial quality; destitute of mind or soul. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. An empty space; a vacuum. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  17. To remove the contents of; to make or leave vacant or empty; to quit; to leave; as, to void a table. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To throw or send out; to evacuate; to emit; to discharge; as, to void excrements. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To render void; to make to be of no validity or effect; to vacate; to annul; to nullify. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To be emitted or evacuated. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  21. Having no incumbent; unoccupied; - said of offices and the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Empty; vacant; lacking: with of; without result; in vain; useless; as, all their efforts were void; unfilled, as an office; in law, having no force; null. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. To cause to be empty; to vacate; to send or throw out; to discahrge; to annul or cance, as a law. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. A vacuum; an empty space. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. Voidable. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. To evacuate, to cast out excrementitious matter. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  27. Unoccupied: empty (so in B.): having no binding force: wanting: unsubstantial. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. An empty space. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  29. To make vacant: to quit: to send out: to render of no effect. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. Empty; destitute; null; unsubstantial. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  31. To vacate; quit; expel; annul. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  32. To render null; annul. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. To send out; emit; evacuate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. Vacant; empty; unoccupied; destitute; clear. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. Having no legal force; ineffective; null; often in the phrase null and void. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. A vacuum; emptiness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. Not occupied with any visible matter; empty; vacant; without inhabitants or furniture; having no legal or binding force; free; clear, destitute; having no incumbent; unsubstantial; vain. Void space, a vacuum To make void, to render useless or of no effect. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  38. To quit; to leave; to evacuate; to render of no validity or effect; to make or leave vacant. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. Empty; not occupied with any visible matter; having no legal or binding force; null; unoccupied; clear. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  40. To leave empty; to empty; to vacate; to evacuate or be evacuated; to send out; to render of no effect. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. Null; Ineffectual; nugatory; having no legal force or binding effect; unable, in law, to support the purpose for which it was intended. “Void” does not always imply entire nullity; but it is, in a legal sense, subject to large qualifications iu view of all the circumstances calling for its application, and the rights and interests to be affected in a given case. Brown v. Brown, 50 N. II. 53S, 552. “Void,” as used in statutes and by the courts, does not usually mean that the act or proceeding is in absolute nullity. Kearney v. Vaugliau, 50 Mo. 2S4. There is this difference between the two words “void” and “voidable;” void means that an instrument or transaction is so nugatory and ineffectual that nothing can cure it; voidable, when an imperfection or defect can be cured by the act or confirmation of him who could take advantage of it Thus, while acceptance of rent will make good a voidable lease, it will not alter in a void lease. Wharton. The true distinction between void and voidable acts, orders, and judgments is that the former can always be assailed in any proceeding, and the latter only in a direct proceeding. Alexander v. Nelson. 42 Ala. 462. The term “void.” as applicable to conveyances or other agreements, has not at all times been used with technical precision, nor restricted to its peculiar and limited sense, as contradistinguished from “voidable;” it being frequently introduced, even by legal writers and jurists, when the purpose is nothing further than to indicate that a contract was invalid, and not binding in law. But the distinction between the terms “void” and “voidable,” in their application to contracts, is often one of great practical importance; and, whenever entire technical accuracy is required, the term “void” can only be properly applied to those contracts that are of no effect whatsoever, such as are a mere nullity, and incapable of confirmation or ratification. Allis v. Billings, 6 Mete. (Mass.) 415, 30 Am. Dec. 744. Void in part, void in toto. Curtis v. Leavitt, 15 N. Y. 9, 90. Void things are as no things. People v. Shall, 9 Cow. (N. Y.) 778, 7S4. thelawdictionary.org
  42. Having no incumbent; unoccupied; -- said of offices and the like. mso.anu.edu.au
  43. Of no legal force or effect, incapable of confirmation or ratification; null. Cf. Voidable, 2. mso.anu.edu.au
  44. Having no incumbent; unoccupied; said of offices and the like. dictgcide_fs
  45. void, adj. unoccupied: empty: destitute (with of): having no binding force: wanting: unsubstantial.--n. an empty space.--v.t. to make vacant: to quit: to send out, emit, empty out: to render of no effect, to nullify: (Spens.) to lay aside, divest one's self of.--adj. VOID'ABLE, that may be voided or evacuated.--n. VOID'ANCE, act of voiding or emptying: state of being void: ejection.--p.adj. VOID'ED (her.), having the inner part cut away or left vacant--said of a charge or ordinary.--ns. VOID'ER, one who empties: a contrivance in armour for covering an unprotected part of the body: a tray for carrying away crumbs, &c.; VOID'ING, the act of voiding: a remnant; VOID'NESS, emptiness: nullity. [O. Fr. voide, void, empty--L. viduus, bereft; others trace to Low L. form, akin to L. vac[=a]re, to be empty.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  46. Empty, vacant, as a v. space, interval; (of office) vacant, as bishopric fell v.; (esp. Law, of deed, promise, contract, &c.) invalid, not binding, as null& v.; (poet., rhet.) ineffectual, useless; v. of, lacking, free from, as a proposal wholly v. of sense, his style is v. of affection. Hence voidly adv., voidness n. (N.) empty space, as vanished into the v., (fig.) the aching v. of his heart, cannot fill the v. made by death. (Vb) render invalid; emit (excrement &c.); (archaic) quit, evacuate. Hence voidable a. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  47. To cast out as waste matter. American pocket medical dictionary.
  48. n. An empty space; a vacuum; emptiness; vacancy. Cabinet Dictionary

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