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Definitions of wait

  1. look forward to the probable occurrence of; "We were expecting a visit from our relatives"; "She is looking to a promotion"; "he is waiting to be drafted" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. time during which some action is awaited; "instant replay caused too long a delay"; "he ordered a hold in the action" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. wait before acting Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. stay in one place and anticipate or expect something; "I had to wait on line for an hour to get the tickets" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the act of waiting (remaining inactive in one place while expecting something); "the wait was an ordeal for him" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. wait on tables; serve as a waiter; in restaurants"I'm waiting on tables at Maxim's" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. serve as a waiter in a restaurant; "I'm waiting on tables at Maxim's" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. To watch; to observe; to take notice. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To stay or rest in expectation; to stop or remain stationary till the arrival of some person or event; to rest in patience; to stay; not to depart. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To stay for; to rest or remain stationary in expectation of; to await; as, to wait orders. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To attend as a consequence; to follow upon; to accompany; to await. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To attend on; to accompany; especially, to attend with ceremony or respect. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. The act of waiting; a delay; a halt. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Ambush. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. One who watches; a watchman. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Hautboys, or oboes, played by town musicians; not used in the singular. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Musicians who sing or play at night or in the early morning, especially at Christmas time; serenaders; musical watchmen. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To cause to wait; to defer; to postpone; - said of a meal; as, to wait dinner. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To linger or tarry; to remain; to stay in a condition of watching or expecting: with for; as, we waited for her for an hour; to attend or serve; as, to wait upon a table. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. To expect or tarry for; to delay; as, to wait dinner. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. The act of staying, or the length of time during which one stays, in expectation; delay. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. To stay in expectation: to remain: to attend (with on): to follow: to lie in ambush. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. To stay for: to await. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. The act of waiting for something or somebody: as, after a long wait we were admitted: the act of waiting in concealment for the purpose of attacking; ambush; a kind of old night watchman: one of a band of musicians in the pay of a town corporation whose duties were at first to pipe or sound the hours and guard the streets, but subsequently to act merely as town's minstrels or musicians; "For as the custom prevails at present there is scarce a young man of any fashion in a corporation that does not make love with the town music; the waits often help him through his courtship."-Steele: at present, one of a band of musicians who promenade the streets during the night and early morning about Christmas or New-year time, performing music appropriate to the season: an old musical instrument of the hautboy or shawm kind; the name of the instrument may be from the waits, who chiefly performed on it. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  25. To stay for; await. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  26. To stay in expectation; remain. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  27. To delay action for (something); await. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. To rest in expectation. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. To stand in readiness. To be or act as a waiter. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. Ambush; the act of waiting. To lie in wait, to lie in ambush. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. To stay for, or remain stationary in expectation of the arrival of; to attend; to accompany with submission. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  32. To stay in expectation: to stay proceedings in expectation; to rest in patient expectation; to stay; to continue by reason of hindrance; to lie in ambush. To wait on or upon, to attend, as a servant; to attend upon; to pay servile attendance; to follow. To wait at, to perform service at. To wait for, to watch, as an enemy. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  33. To be on the look-out for; to expect; to remain until something happens; to remain quiet; to attend; to lie in ambush. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. To cause to wait; to defer; to postpone; -- said of a meal; as, to wait dinner. mso.anu.edu.au
  35. To cause to wait; to defer; to postpone; said of a meal; as, to wait dinner. dictgcide_fs
  36. w[=a]t, v.i. to stay in expectation (with for): to remain: to attend (with on): to follow: to lie in ambush.--v.t. to stay for: to await: (coll.) to defer: (obs.) to accompany.--n. ambush, now used only in such phrases as 'to lie in wait,' 'to lay wait:' the: act of waiting or expecting: delay: (pl.) itinerant musicians, originally watchmen, who welcome-in Christmas.--ns. WAIT'ER, one who waits: an attending servant: a salver or tray: a custom-house officer: (obs.) a watchman; WAIT'ERAGE, service; WAIT'ERING, the employment of a waiter; WAIT'ING, act of waiting: attendance.--adv. WAIT'INGLY.--ns. WAIT'ING-MAID, -WOM'AN, a female attendant; WAIT'ING-ROOM, a room for the convenience of persons waiting; WAIT'ING-VASS'AL (Shak.), an attendant; WAIT'RESS, a female waiter.--WAIT ATTENDANCE (Shak.), to remain in attendance; WAIT UPON, ON, to call upon, visit: to accompany, to be in the service of: (B.) to look toward, to attend to, do the bidding of.--LIE IN WAIT, to be in hiding ready for attack or surprise.--LORDS, or GROOMS, IN WAITING, certain officers in the Lord Chamberlain's department of the royal household; MINORITY WAITER, a waiter out of employment, as a political minority is out of office. [O. Fr. waiter (Fr. guetter), to watch, attend--waite, a sentinel--Old High Ger. wahta (Ger. wacht), a watchman; cog. with A.S. wacan, to watch.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  37. Abstain from action or departure till some expected event occurs, pause, tarry, stay, kick one\'s heels, be expectant or on the watch, (often for, till; w. a minute; shall not w. here any longer; kept me waiting or made me w.; have a month to w. yet; w. till I come, for high water or a fine day; everything comes to those who w.; always has to be waited for, is unpunctual); await, bide, (is waiting his opportunity; you must w. my convenience; am only waiting the signal); act as waiter, as servant shifting plates &c. at table, (are you accustomed to waiting?; often at table), or as attendant (LORD, GROOM, in waiting); defer (meal) till some one arrives (don\'t w. dinner for me); w. (up)on, watch (archaic), await convenience of, serve as attendant esp. at table, pay visit to (person regarded as superior), escort (archaic), (in race) purposely keep close behind (competitor), follow as result; waiting-room, provided for persons to w. in esp. at railway-station or house of consultant. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  38. 1. (Pl.) band (s) of persons singing carols &c. from house to house at Christmas. 2. Act or time of waiting (had a long w. for the train); watching for enemy, ambush, (lie in or lay w. usu. for). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  39. n. Ambush ;-pl. Itinerant musicians who perform in the streets about Christmas time at night or in the early morning ; serenaders. Cabinet Dictionary

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