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Definitions of war

  1. a legal state created by a declaration of war and ended by official declaration during which the international rules of war apply; "war was declared in November but actual fighting did not begin until the following spring" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. make or wage war Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a concerted campaign to end something that is injurious; "the war on poverty"; "the war against crime" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. the waging of armed conflict against an enemy; "thousands of people were killed in the war" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. an active struggle between competing entities; "a price war"; "a war of wits"; "diplomatic warfare" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. Ware; aware. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. A contest between nations or states, carried on by force, whether for defence, for revenging insults and redressing wrongs, for the extension of commerce, for the acquisition of territory, for obtaining and establishing the superiority and dominion of one over the other, or for any other purpose; armed conflict of sovereign powers; declared and open hostilities. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A condition of belligerency to be maintained by physical force. In this sense, levying war against the sovereign authority is treason. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Instruments of war. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Forces; army. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. The profession of arms; the art of war. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. a state of opposition or contest; an act of opposition; an inimical contest, act, or action; enmity; hostility. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To make war; to invade or attack a state or nation with force of arms; to carry on hostilities; to be in a state by violence. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To contend; to strive violently; to fight. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To make war upon; to fight. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To carry on, as a contest; to wage. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Hostile conflict between organized groups of people. Medical Dictionary DB
  18. The state of armed attack of defense aginst another; a contest by force between states or nations; an armed conflict; oppsition or contest; contention; as, a war of words; hostility or enmity. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. To engage in an armed conflict; fight. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. Warred. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. Warring. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. A state of opposition or contest: a contest between states carried on by arms: open hostility: the profession of arms. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. To make war: to contend: to fight:-pr.p. warring; pa.t. and pa.p. warred. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. Armed contention between States or large numbers of people; open hostility. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. To make war; contend. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  26. To be at war; make war; contend. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. An armed contest between nations or states. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. A contest between nations or states, or parties in the same state, carried on by force of arms; instruments of war; forces; arms; the profession of arms; art of war; hostility; state of opposition or contest; enmity; disposition to contention. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. To carry on a contest. Man-of-war, an armed ship of large size, for attack or defence. Holy war, a religious war; a crusade. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To make war; to invade or attack a nation or state with force of arms; to carry on hostilities; to contend; to strive violently. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. An armed contest between nations or states; a contest carried on by force of arms; open hostility; the profession of arms; opposition or contest of any kind carried on between two parties. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. To attack a state with force of arms; to carry on hostilities; to contend; to strive with violence. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. A state of forcible contention; an armed contest between nations; a state of hostility between two or more nations or states. Gro. de Jur. B. lib. 1, c. 1. Every connection by force between two nations, in external matters, under the au- thority of their respective governments, is a public war. If war is declared in form, It is called "solemn," and is of the perfect kind; because the whole nation is at war with an- other whole nation. When the hostilities are limited as respects places, persons, and things, the war is properly termed "imperfect war." Bas v. Tingy, 4 Dall. 37, 40 1 L. Ed. 731. thelawdictionary.org
  34. The most important topic in connection with war is the formation of the army which is destined to carry it on. [ARMY] In ( 1 Kings 9:22 ) at a period (Solomons reign) when the organization of the army was complete, we have apparently a list of the various gradations of rank in the service, as follows: 1. "Men of war" = privates ; 2. "servants," the lowest rank of officers --lieutenants ; 3. "princes" = captains ; 4. "captains," perhaps = staff officers ; 5. "rulers of the chariots and his horsemen" = cavalry officers . Formal proclamations of war were not interchanged between the belligerents. Before entering the enemys district spies were seat to ascertain the character of the country and the preparations of its inhabitants for resistance. ( Numbers 13:17 ; Joshua 2:1 ; Judges 7:10 ; 1 Samuel 26:4 ) The combat assumed the form of a number of hand-to-hand contests; hence the high value attached to fleetness of foot and strength of arm. ( 2 Samuel 1:23 ; 2:18 ; 1 Chronicles 12:8 ) At the same time various strategic devices were practiced, such as the ambuscade, ( Joshua 8:2 Joshua 8:12 ; Judges 20:36 ) surprise, ( Judges 7:16 ) or circumvention. ( 2 Samuel 5:23 ) Another mode of settling the dispute was by the selection of champions, ( 1 Samuel 17 ; 2 Samuel 2:14 ) who were spurred on to exertion by the offer of high reward. ( 1 Samuel 17:25 ; 18:25 ; 2 Samuel 18:11 ; 1 Chronicles 11:6 ) The contest having been decided, the conquerors were recalled from the pursuit by the sound of a trumpet. ( 2 Samuel 2:28 ; 18:16 ; 20:22 ) The siege of a town or fortress was conducted in the following manner: A line of circumvallation was drawn round the place, ( Ezekiel 4:2 ; Micah 5:1 ) constructed out of the trees found in the neighborhood, ( 20:20 ) together with earth and any other materials at hand. This line not only cut off the besieged from the surrounding country, but also served as a base of operations for the besiegers. The next step was to throw out from this line one or more mounds or "banks" in the direction of the city, ( 2 Samuel 20:15 ; 2 Kings 19:32 ; Isaiah 37:33 ) which were gradually increased in height until they were about half as high as the city wall. On this mound or bank towers were erected, ( 2 Kings 25:1 ; Jeremiah 52:4 ; Ezekiel 4:2 ; 17:17 ; 21:22 ; 26:8 ) whence the slingers and archers might attack with effect. Catapults were prepared for hurling large darts and stones; and the crow , a long spar, with iron claws at one end and ropes at the other, to pull down stones or men from the top of the wall. Battering-rams , ( Ezekiel 4:2 ; 21:22 ) were brought up to the walls by means of the bank, and scaling-ladders might also be placed on it. The treatment of the conquered was extremely severe in ancient times. The bodies of the soldiers killed in action were plundered, ( 1 Samuel 31:8 ) 2 Macc 8:27; the survivors were either killed in some savage manner, ( Judges 9:45 ; 2 Samuel 12:31 ; 2 Chronicles 25:12 ) mutilated, ( Judges 9:45 ; 2 Samuel 12:31 ; 2 Chronicles 25:12 ) mutilated, ( Judges 1:6 ; 1 Samuel 11:2 ) or carried into captivity. ( Numbers 31:26 ) biblestudytools.com
  35. The Israelites had to take possession of the Promised Land by conquest. They had to engage in a long and bloody war before the Canaanitish tribes were finally subdued. Except in the case of Jericho and Ai, the war did not become aggressive till after the death of Joshua. Till then the attack was always first made by the Canaanites. Now the measure of the iniquity of the Canaanites was full, and Israel was employed by God to sweep them away from off the face of the earth. In entering on this new stage of the war, the tribe of Judah, according to divine direction, took the lead. In the days of Saul and David the people of Israel engaged in many wars with the nations around, and after the division of the kingdom into two they often warred with each other. They had to defend themselves also against the inroads of the Egyptians, the Assyrians, and the Babylonians. The whole history of Israel from first to last presents but few periods of peace. The Christian life is represented as a warfare, and the Christian graces are also represented under the figure of pieces of armour ( Ephesians 6:11-17 ; 1 Thessalonians 5:8 ; 2 Tim 1 Thessalonians 2:3 1 Thessalonians 2:4 ). The final blessedness of believers is attained as the fruit of victory ( Revelation 3:21 ). biblestudytools.com
  36. wawr, n. a state of opposition or contest: a contest between states carried on by arms: open hostility: the profession of arms: (rare) army, warlike preparations, warlike outfit.--v.i. to make war: to contend: to fight:--pr.p. war'ring; pa.t. and pa.p. warred.--ns. WAR'-CRY, a cry or signal used in war; WAR'-DANCE, a dance engaged in by some savage tribes before going to war; WAR'F[=A]RE, armed contest, military life; WAR'F[=A]RER; WAR'F[=A]RING; WAR'-HORSE, a charger, a horse used in battle.--adj. WAR'LIKE, fond of war, pertaining to or threatening war: martial, military.--ns. WAR'LIKENESS; WAR'MAN (rare), a warrior.--adj. WAR'-MARKED (Shak.), experienced in war.--ns. WAR'-MONG'ER (Spens.), a mercenary soldier; WAR'-OFF'ICE, the English military bureau or department; WAR'-PAINT, paint applied to the face and person by savages, indicating that they are going to war: (slang) full-dress, equipment; WAR'-PATH, among the Red Indians, the path followed on a military expedition, the expedition itself; WAR'-PROOF (rare), fitness to be a soldier; WAR'RIOR, a soldier, a veteran:--fem. WAR'RIORESS (rare); WAR'-SHIP, a vessel for war; WAR'-SONG, a song sung by men about to fight: a song celebrating brave deeds in war; WAR'-TAX, a tax levied for purposes of war; WAR'-THOUGHT (Shak.), martial deliberation.--adjs. WAR'-WAST'ED, laid waste or ravaged by war; WAR'-WEA'RIED, -WORN, wearied, worn, with military service--of a veteran.--ns. WAR'-WHOOP, a cry uttered by savages on going into battle; WAR'-WOLF, a medieval military engine used in defending fortresses; MAN'-OF-WAR (see MAN).--WAR DEPARTMENT, in Great Britain, a department of the state under a Cabinet Minister, the Secretary of State for War, assisted by a permanent and a parliamentary under-secretary, having control of everything connected with the army; WAR OF LIBERATION, the war of independence carried on by Prussia, with the help of Russia and Great Britain, against Napoleon in 1813.--DECLARATION OF WAR, that public announcement of war by a duly organised state or kingdom which is necessary to constitute an enemy; DECLARE WAR, to announce war publicly; HOLY WAR (see HOLY); MAKE WAR, to carry on hostilities; NAPOLEONIC WARS, a general name for the wars of France dating from the campaigns of Napoleon in Italy (1796) to his overthrow in 1815; PRIVATE WAR, warfare waged between persons in their individual capacity, as by duelling, family feuds, &c.; SACRED WARS, in ancient Greek history, wars against states judged guilty of sacrilege by the Amphictyonic Council; SEVEN WEEKS' WAR, or SEVEN DAYS' WAR, the Austro-Prussian war of 1866. [A.S. werre, influenced by O. Fr. werre (Fr. guerre), which is from Old High Ger. werra, quarrel.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  37. wawr, adj. (Spens.) worse.--v.t. (Scot.) to defeat. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  38. Quarrel usu. between nations conducted by force, state of open hostility& suspension of ordinary international law prevalent during such quarrel, military or naval attack or series of attacks, (fig.) hostility or contention between persons, (civil w., between parts of one nation for supremacy; private w., feud between persons or families carried on in defiance of laws of murder &c., or armed attack made by members of one State without government sanction upon another; holy w., waged in support of some religious cause; make or wage w., begin or carry on hostile operations; declare w., announce that hostilities may be expected, often upon another nation, also fig. upon institution, party, custom, &c.; so declaration of w.; drift into w.; be at w., engaged in hostilities with enemy or abs., also fig.; roll back tide of w., repel invasion; go to the ww. archaic, serve as soldier; has been in the ww., usu. fig. of person who has been mauled physically or otherwise; on a w. footing, of army, fleet, &c., with full establishment; w. to the knife, struggle to the bitter end usu. between persons; Secretary at W., parliamentary head of W. Office; art of w., strategy& tactics; trade of w., soldier\'s profession; sinews of w., money for waging w. or for effecting any object; TUG, CONTRABAND, COUNCIL, HONOURS, of w.; MAN-of-w.; laws of w., those recognized by civilized nations as limiting belligerents\' action; rights of w., those similarly permitting to belligerents certain acts illegitimate in peace; the dogs of w. poet., havoc attending w.; ww. & rumours of ww., prevalence of the appeal to force among nations; w. of the elements, storms& catastrophes in nature; all\'s FAIR in love& w.); w.-cry, phrase or name formerly shouted in charging or rallying to attack, party catchword, savages\' battle-shout; w.-cloud, position of international affairs that threatens w.; w.-dance, indulged in by savages before w.; w.-god, one worshipped as giving victory in w., esp. the Greek Ares or Roman Mars; w.-head, explosive head of torpedo, removed in peace practice; w.-horse, charger (archaic& poet. exc. in phr. like an old w.-h. of person excited by memories of abandoned pursuit or controversy); W. Office, State department in charge of army; w.-paint, put on body by savages before battle, (fig.) ceremonial costume, full fig; w.-path, (route of) warlike expedition of Amer. Indians (be, go, on the w.-p. fig., be engaged in, enter upon, any conflict, have taken, take, up the cudgels; w.-ship, for use in w.; w.-song, sung by savages before battle, also any song on martial theme; w.-whoop, yell esp. of Amer. Indians in charging; w.-worn, experienced in or damaged or exhausted by w. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  39. Make w. (archaic); bring or beat down by w.; (part.) rival, competing, inconsistent, (warring creeds, principles). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  40. carry the w. into the enemy\'s country, (fig.) make counter-accusations &c., not confine oneself to defence. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  41. n. [Anglo-Saxon]A state of opposition or contest ; enmity ; hostility ;- a contest between nations or states carried on by force; armed conflict of sovereign powers ;- the profession of arms; art of war. Cabinet Dictionary

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