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Definitions of warm

  1. having or displaying warmth or affection; "affectionate children"; "caring parents"; "a fond embrace"; "fond of his nephew"; "a tender glance"; "a warm embrace" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. characterized by strong enthusiasm; "ardent revolutionaries"; "warm support" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. of a seeker; near to the object sought; "you're getting warm"; "hot on the trail" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. easily aroused or excited; "a quick temper"; "a warm temper" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. freshly made or left; "a warm trail"; "the scent is warm" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. get warm or warmer; "The soup warmed slowly on the stove" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. in a warm manner; "warmly dressed"; "warm-clad skiers" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. uncomfortable because of possible danger or trouble; "made things warm for the bookies" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. characterized by liveliness or excitement or disagreement; "a warm debate" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. having or producing a comfortable and agreeable degree of heat or imparting or maintaining heat; "a warm body"; "a warm room"; "a warm climate"; "a warm coat" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. (color) inducing the impression of warmth; used especially of reds and oranges and yellows; "warm reds and yellows and orange" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. make warm or warmer; "The blanket will warm you" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. psychologically warm; friendly and responsive; "a warm greeting"; "a warm personality"; "warm support" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. Having heat in a moderate degree; not cold as, warm milk. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Having a sensation of heat, esp. of gentle heat; glowing. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Subject to heat; having prevalence of heat, or little or no cold weather; as, the warm climate of Egypt. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Fig.: Not cool, indifferent, lukewarm, or the like, in spirit or temper; zealous; ardent; fervent; excited; sprightly; irritable; excitable. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Violent; vehement; furious; excited; passionate; as, a warm contest; a warm debate. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Being well off as to property, or in good circumstances; forehanded; rich. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. In children's games, being near the object sought for; hence, being close to the discovery of some person, thing, or fact concealed. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To communicate a moderate degree of heat to; to render warm; to supply or furnish heat to; as, a stove warms an apartment. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To make engaged or earnest; to interest; to engage; to excite ardor or zeal; to enliven. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To become warm, or moderately heated; as, the earth soon warms in a clear day summer. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. The act of warming, or the state of being warmed; a warming; a heating. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. Having yellow or red for a basis, or in their composition; - said of colors, and opposed to cold which is of blue and its compounds. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To become ardent or animated; as, the speake warms as he proceeds. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Having heat in a moderate degree; not cold; giving out moderate heat; preventing one from feeling cold; having little cold weather, as a climate; earnest; eager; passionate; kindly; suggesting heat by color, as red. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. To impart moderate heat to; to fill with interested or excited; as, the audience warmed to the speaker. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. To become moderately heated; to become interested or excited; as, the audience warmed to the speaker. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. Warmly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. Having moderate heat, hot: subject to heat: zealous: easily excited: violent: enthusiastic. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. To make warm: to interest: to excite. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  33. To become warm or ardent. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  34. WARMNESS, WARMER. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. Warmth: heat. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. A warming: a heating: as. let us get a good warm. Dickens. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  37. Having moderate heat; zealous; excited; excitable. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  38. To make, or become, warm. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  39. To make or become warm; heat slightly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. Having moderate heat. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. Ardent; zealous; passionate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. Having heat in a moderate degree; not cold: having prevalence of heat; zealous; ardent; habitually ardent; irritable; keen; animated; busy or heated in action; fanciful; enthusiastic; vigorous; sprightly. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  43. To communicate a moderate degree of heat to; to interest; to engage; to excite ardour or zeal in; to set aglow. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  44. To become moderately heated; to become ardent or animated. Warm colours, those which have yellow or yellow-red for their basis. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  45. Having heat in a moderate or gentle degree; having little or no winter, as a climate; zealous; ardent; easily excited or provoked; enthusiastic; in paint., applied to colours that have yellow or yellow-red for their base; easy and safe in money matters, as "he was deemed a warm man". Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  46. To impart heat to in a moderate degree only; to excite to ardour or zeal in; to become warm or animated. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  47. Having yellow or red for a basis, or in their composition; -- said of colors, and opposed to cold which is of blue and its compounds. mso.anu.edu.au
  48. Having yellow or red for a basis, or in their composition; said of colors, and opposed to cold which is of blue and its compounds. dictgcide_fs
  49. To become ardent or animated; as, the speakewarms as he proceeds. dictgcide_fs
  50. wawrm, adj. having moderate heat, hot: subject to heat: zealous: easily excited: violent: enthusiastic: intimate, close: fresh, of a scent: (coll.) comfortable, well-off: (coll.) indelicate.--v.t. to make warm: to interest: to excite: (coll.) to beat.--v.i. to become warm or ardent.--n. (coll.) a heating.--adj. WARM'-BLOOD'ED, having warm blood: generous, passionate.--n. WAR'MER.--adj. WARM'-HEART'ED, having warm affections: affectionate: hearty.--ns. WARM'-HEART'EDNESS; WAR'MING, act of warming: (slang) a beating; WAR'MING-PAN, a covered pan, with a long handle, for holding live-coals to warm a bed: a person put into a situation to hold it till another is able to take it.--adv. WARM'LY.--ns. WARM'NESS; WARMTH, moderate heat: geniality: earnestness, moderate or growing anger: the bright effect of warm colours.--WARM COLOURS (paint.), colours of which the basis is yellow or red. [A.S. wearm; Ger. warm.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  51. Hottish, of or at rather high temperature, (hot, w., tepid, cool, cold; w. water, weather, countries; w. blood, that of mammals& birds ranging from 98 to 112, also fig. passionate or amorous or emotional disposition, whence warm-blooded a.; w. with slang, spirits& hot water with sugar), (of persons &c.) with temperature of skin raised by exercise or excitement or external heat; (of friendly relations or actions or agents) enthusiastic, hearty, zealous, (a w. partisan, friend, welcome, RECEPtion; w. thanks); animated, heated, exciting or excited, in or resulting from sanguine or offended or indignant or unreserved mood, (when w. with wine; the dispute or disputants grew w.; w. work, keen or dangerous conflict); (of position &c.) difficult or dangerous to maintain or meet (a w. corner, hot part of battle &c.; so w. RECEPTION; make it or things w. for one, create strong feeling against him); (of feelings &c.) sympathetic, emotional, affectionate, susceptible, (has a w. heart, whence warmhearted a., warm-heartedly adv., warm-heartedness n.; a w. temperament, susceptible esp. to amorous impressions; w. descriptions &c., intended to appeal to amorous feelings, indelicate); (of colour) suggestive of warmth, esp. containing rich reds or yellows; (of scent in hunting) fresh& strong, indicating recent passage of quarry, (of seeker in children\'s hiding games) near the object sought, on verge of finding; (of person) comfortably off, rich; (of official &c.) no longer strange, comfortably established, in office. Hence warmly adv., warmth n. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  52. Make w., excite, (fire warms room, person, &c.; wine to w. the heart; w. oneself at fire &c.; w. person or his jacket, thrash him, whence warming n. slang); w. oneself at fire &c.; become w. or animated or sympathetic (often up; room is warming up; he warmed up or warmed as he got into his subject; my heart warms to him); warming-pan, flat closed long-handled usu. brass vessel holding live coals formerly used for warming inside of bed before it was occupied, (fig.) person holding office temporarily to keep it for another not yet of age &c.; hence -warmer (2) n. (N.)act of warming oneself or something (must have, give it, another w. first). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  53. (Also, of clothes&c.) serving to keep one w. Concise Oxford Dictionary

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