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Definitions of waste

  1. an uninhabited wilderness that is worthless for cultivation; "the barrens of central Africa"; "the trackless wastes of the desert" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. disposed of as useless; "waste paper" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. spend extravagantly; "waste not, want not" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. located in a dismal or remote area; desolate; "a desert island"; "a godforsaken wilderness crossroads"; "a wild stretch of land"; "waste places" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. devastate or ravage; "The enemy lay waste to the countryside after the invasion" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. useless or profitless activity; using or expending or consuming thoughtlessly or carelessly; "if the effort brings no compensating gain it is a waste"; "mindless dissipation of natural resources" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. cause to grow thin or weak; "The treatment emaciated him" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. lose vigor, health, or flesh, as through grief; "After her husband died, she just pined away" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. (law) reduction in the value of an estate caused by act or neglect Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. waste away; "Political prisoners are wasting away in many prisons all over the world" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. run off as waste; "The water wastes back into the ocean" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. the trait of wasting resources; "a life characterized by thriftlessness and waste"; "the wastefulness of missed opportunities" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. any materials unused and rejected as worthless or unwanted; "they collect the waste once a week"; "much of the waste material is carried off in the sewers" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. use inefficiently or inappropriately; "waste heat"; "waste a joke on an unappreciative audience" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. get rid of (someone who may be a threat) by killing; "The mafia liquidated the informer"; "the double agent was neutralized" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. get rid of; "We waste the dirty water by channeling it into the sewer" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. make a mess of, destroy or ruin; "I botched the dinner and we had to eat out"; "the pianist screwed up the difficult passage in the second movement" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. Material derived by mechanical and chemical erosion from the land, carried by streams to the sea. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Desolate; devastated; stripped; bare; hence, dreary; dismal; gloomy; cheerless. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Lying unused; unproductive; worthless; valueless; refuse; rejected; as, waste land; waste paper. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Lost for want of occupiers or use; superfluous. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To bring to ruin; to devastate; to desolate; to destroy. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To wear away by degrees; to impair gradually; to diminish by constant loss; to use up; to consume; to spend; to wear out. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To spend unnecessarily or carelessly; to employ prodigally; to expend without valuable result; to apply to useless purposes; to lavish vainly; to squander; to cause to be lost; to destroy by scattering or injury. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To damage, impair, or injure, as an estate, voluntarily, or by suffering the buildings, fences, etc., to go to decay. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To be diminished; to lose bulk, substance, strength, value, or the like, gradually; to be consumed; to dwindle; to grow less. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. The act of wasting, or the state of being wasted; a squandering; needless destruction; useless consumption or expenditure; devastation; loss without equivalent gain; gradual loss or decrease, by use, wear, or decay; as, a waste of property, time, labor, words, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. That which is wasted or desolate; a devastated, uncultivated, or wild country; a deserted region; an unoccupied or unemployed space; a dreary void; a desert; a wilderness. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. That which is of no value; worthless remnants; refuse. Specifically: Remnants of cops, or other refuse resulting from the working of cotton, wool, hemp, and the like, used for wiping machinery, absorbing oil in the axle boxes of railway cars, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. Spoil, destruction, or injury, done to houses, woods, fences, lands, etc., by a tenant for life or for years, to the prejudice of the heir, or of him in reversion or remainder. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. Old or abandoned workings, whether left as vacant space or filled with refuse. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. To procure or sustain a reduction of flesh; - said of a jockey in preparation for a race, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. To lay in ruins; to destroy; to wear away gradually; to spend or use recklessly. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  34. To lose bulk value, or strength. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  35. Lying unused; desolate; dreary; desert; unproductive; worthless. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  36. The act of spending carelessly; that which is unused; the state of being unused, squandered, etc.; something thrown aside in a manufacturing process; as, cotton waste; refuse; a desert. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  37. Wastefully. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. Wastefulness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. Empty, desert: desolate: stripped: lying unused: unproductive. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  40. To lay waste or make desolate: to destroy: to wear out gradually: to squander: to diminish: to impair. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  41. To be diminished: to dwindle: to be consumed. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  42. Act of wasting: useless expenditure: loss: destruction: that which is wasted or waste: uncultivated country: desert: refuse. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  43. Act of wasting; anything wasted; loss; diminution; uncultivated land; desert; refuse. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  44. Desert; desolate; unproductive; unused; valueless. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  45. To be diminished. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  46. To lay waste; desolate; destory; wear away; squauder; impair. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  47. To expend thoughtlessly or idly; squander. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. To lose or cause to lose strength or substance gradually, as by disease or training. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  49. Worthless; useless; refuse. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  50. Unproductive; desert; made desolate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  51. The act of wasting or squandering. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  52. A continuous diminishing or failing; wasting; decline. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  53. A wilderness; desert. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  54. Wasteful. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  55. Destroyed; ruined; desolate; uncultivated; destitute; stripped; superfiuous; worthless; of no value; untilled. Laid waste, desolated; ruined. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  56. To diminish by gradual dissipation or loss; to scatter and destroy; to squander; to cause to be lost through wantonness or negligence; to destroy in enmity; to desolate; to destroy by violence: to impair strength gradually; to wear out; to spend; to consume; to damage, impair or injure, as an estate, by suffering the buildings, fences, &c., to go to decay; to exhaust. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  57. To lose bulk or substance gradually; to be diminished or lost by slow dissipation, consumption or evaporation. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  58. The act of squandering; dissipation of property through wantonness, ambition, extravagance, luxury, or negligence; useless expenditure; prodigality or dissipation; a desolate or uncultivated country; land untilled, though capable of tillage; region ruined and deserted; mischief; destruction; spoil, destruction or injury done to houses, woods, &c., to the prejudice of the heir. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  59. To destroy or expend wantonly or unnecessarily; to squander; to throw away; to wear out; to consume; to damage or injure; to lose bulk or substance gradually; to be consumed or dissipated. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  60. Ruined; destroyed; uncultivated; rejected, or used for inferior purposes; that of which no account is taken. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  61. Land untilled; a region ruined, deserted, or desolate; a space unoccupied; the act of squandering; that which is rejected; refuse cotton or silk; useless expense; among miners, the old neglected workings of a coalmine. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  62. ders v. Seelye, 105 U. S. 718, 26 L. Ed. 1217. thelawdictionary.org
  63. To procure or sustain a reduction of flesh; -- said of a jockey in preparation for a race, etc. mso.anu.edu.au
  64. To be diminished; to lose bulk, substance, strength, value, or the like, gradually; to be consumed; to dwindle; to grow less; commonly used with away. dictgcide_fs
  65. To procure or sustain a reduction of flesh; said of a jockey in preparation for a race, etc. dictgcide_fs
  66. w[=a]st, adj. empty, desert: desolate: useless, vain: stripped: lying unused: unproductive.--v.t. to lay waste or make desolate: to destroy: to wear out gradually: to squander: to diminish: to impair.--v.i. to be diminished: to dwindle: to be consumed.--n. act of wasting: useless expenditure: superfluous material, stuff left over: loss: destruction: that which is wasted or waste: uncultivated country: desert: refuse, as of coal, &c.: decay, decline: (law) natural but permanent injury to the inheritance.--ns. W[=A]S'TAGE, loss by use, natural decay; WASTE'-BAS'KET, WASTE'PAPER-BAS'KET, a basket for holding useless scraps of paper; WASTE'-BOOK, a book in which merchants make entries of transactions in order as they occur, and for a temporary purpose.--adj. WASTE'FUL, full of waste: destructive: lavish: (Spens.) desolate.--adv. WASTE'FULLY.--ns. WASTE'FULNESS; WASTE'-GATE, a gate for discharging surplus water from a dam, &c.; W[=A]S'TEN (Spens.), a desert; WASTE'NESS (B.), devastation; WASTE'-PIPE, a pipe for carrying off waste or surplus water; W[=A]S'TER, one who or that which wastes: a spendthrift: a destroyer: an article spoilt in the making.--adj. W[=A]S'TING, devastating: enfeebling-- (WASTING INVESTMENTS, stocks redeemable on a certain date at a fixed price, for which a premium above the redemption price is paid).--ns. W[=A]S'TING, devastation; W[=A]S'TREL, refuse: anything neglected, a neglected child: (dial.) a profligate; W[=A]S'TRY (Scot.), prodigality.--adj. improvident.--WASTE LANDS, uncultivated and unprofitable tracts in populous and cultivated countries; WASTE TIME, to employ time unprofitably or not at all.--RUN TO WASTE, to become incapable or useless.--UTILISATION OF WASTE PRODUCTS, the putting to other use of such material as is rendered either wholly or partially useless in the manufacture of articles and products--e.g. waste-silk is now a valuable raw material for a large spun-silk industry. [O. Fr. wast, gaste--L. vastus, waste; cf. A.S. wéste, Ger. wüst, desolate.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  67. (Of district &c.) desolate, desert, uninhabited, uncultivated, as result of natural barrenness &c. or of ravages or catastrophe (lay w., ravage; lie w., be uncultivated; w. land, not occupied for any purpose), (fig.) monotonous or presenting no features of interest (the w. periods of history), superfluous, refuse, no longer serving a purpose, left over after use, (w. products, useless by-products of manufacture; w. energy, steam, &c.; w. paper, esp. books or documents that fail or are valueless). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  68. Lay WASTE; (Law) bring (estate) into bad condition by damage or neglect; expend to no purpose or for inadequate result, use extravagantly, squander, (w. money, time, food, &c., or abs. as w. not, want not); wear (t. & i.) gradually away, wither, (archaic, of time) pass t. & i., (his resources were wasted, were rapidly wasting; day wastes, draws to a close; sorcerer wasted his arm; a wasting disease; is wasting away for lack of food); run to w. (that water is wasting). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  69. Desert, w. region, dreary scene, (a w. of waters, unbroken expanse of sea); being used up, diminution by wear& tear, (the w. of tissue is continuous; w. & repair balance each other); w. material or food, useless remains, refuse, scraps, shreds; act of wasting, throwing away or extravagant or ineffectual use of time, money, food, &c., (wilful w. makes woeful want; it is w. of time to argue further; run to w. of liquid or fig. of affection &c., be wasted); (Law) injury to estate caused by act or neglect esp. of life-tenant. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  70. n. Act of wasting, desolating, lavishing, expending and the like ;—that which is wasted or desolate; uncultivated, or wild country ; unoccupied or unemployed space ; desert ;-that which is of no value; worthless remnant; refuse ; spoil, destruction, or injury done to houses, woods, fences, lands, &c., by a tenant ;-prodigality ; dissipation. Cabinet Dictionary

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