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Definitions of watch

  1. find out, learn, or determine with certainty, usually by making an inquiry or other effort; "I want to see whether she speaks French"; "See whether it works"; "find out if he speaks Russian"; "Check whether the train leaves on time" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. follow with the eyes or the mind; "Keep an eye on the baby, please!"; "The world is watching Sarajevo"; "She followed the men with the binoculars" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. observe with attention; "They watched as the murderer was executed" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. be vigilant, be on the lookout, be on one's guard, be careful; "Watch out for pickpockets!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a person employed to watch for something to happen Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. see or watch; "view a show on television"; "This program will be seen all over the world"; "view an exhibition"; "Catch a show on Broadway"; "see a movie" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a small portable timepiece Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a purposeful surveillance to guard or observe Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a devotional watch (especially on the eve of a religious festival) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a period of time (4 or 2 hours) during which some of a ship's crew are on duty Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. the period during which someone (especially a guard) is on duty Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. observe or determine by looking; "Watch how the dog chases the cats away" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. look attentively; "watch a basketball game" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. The act of watching; forbearance of sleep; vigil; wakeful, vigilant, or constantly observant attention; close observation; guard; preservative or preventive vigilance; formerly, a watching or guarding by night. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. One who watches, or those who watch; a watchman, or a body of watchmen; a sentry; a guard. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. The post or office of a watchman; also, the place where a watchman is posted, or where a guard is kept. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. The period of the night during which a person does duty as a sentinel, or guard; the time from the placing of a sentinel till his relief; hence, a division of the night. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A small timepiece, or chronometer, to be carried about the person, the machinery of which is moved by a spring. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. An allotted portion of time, usually four hour for standing watch, or being on deck ready for duty. Cf. Dogwatch. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. That part, usually one half, of the officers and crew, who together attend to the working of a vessel for an allotted time, usually four hours. The watches are designated as the port watch, and the starboard watch. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To be awake; to be or continue without sleep; to wake; to keep vigil. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To be attentive or vigilant; to give heed; to be on the lookout; to keep guard; to act as sentinel. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To be expectant; to look with expectation; to wait; to seek opportunity. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To remain awake with any one as nurse or attendant; to attend on the sick during the night; as, to watch with a man in a fever. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To give heed to; to observe the actions or motions of, for any purpose; to keep in view; not to lose from sight and observation; as, to watch the progress of a bill in the legislature. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To tend; to guard; to have in keeping. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To serve the purpose of a watchman by floating properly in its place; - said of a buoy. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. Close observation; vigilance; attendance without sleep; a watchman; a guard or sentry; division of the night; period, usually of four hours, during which a given part of a ship's crew are on duty on deck; a pocket timepiece. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. To be or keep awake; keep guard; act as an attendant. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. To tend; guard; keep in sight. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. Watcher. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  32. Act of looking out: close observation: guard: one who watches or those who watch: a sentry: the place where a guard is kept: time of watching, esp. in a ship: a division of the night: a pocket timepiece. The essential parts of a watch are the dial on which the hours, minutes, and seconds are marked, the hands which move round the dial pointing to these divisions, the train of wheels which carry round the hands, etc., the blanace which regulates the motion of the wheels, and the coiled spring (the mainspring), whose elastic force produces the motion of the whole machinery, the movement being inclosed in a protecting case usually of gold or silver. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  33. A repeating watch or repeater has in addition a small bell, gong, or other sounding object on which the hours, half-hours, quarters, etc., are struck on the compression of a spring. A chronometer watch or pocket chronometer isone of the finest kinds of watches fitted with a compensation balance and other devices which prevent the variations of temperature from affecting the regular movement of the watch. Watches were invented at Nuremberg about the beginning of the sixteenth century, and for a long time the wearing of a watch was considered in some degree a mark or proof of gentility. Thus Malvolio remarks in anticipation of his great fortune. "I frown the while; and perchance wind up my watch, or play with my-some rich jewel."-Shak. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  34. To look with attention: to keep guard: to look out. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. To keep in view: to give heed to: to have in keeping: to guard. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. Act of watching; guard; one who watches, or those who watch: time of watching; division of the night: pocket timepiece. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  37. To keep in view; give heed to; guard. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  38. To look attentively; keep guard; be awake. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  39. To observe closely; keep in view; guard. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. To be on the alert; be wakeful; serve as a watchman. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. To wait expectantly; followed by for. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. Vigilant observation; wakefulness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. A watcher; watchman; guard; also, watchmen collectively. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. The period of time that one set of men is on duty; a division of the night; also, the men on duty. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. A pocket mechanism for keeping time. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  46. Forbearance of sleep; attendance without sleep; attention; close observation; guard; a watchman or watchmen set for a guard; the place where guard is kept; post or office of a watchman; a certain period of the night in which one person or a set of persons staud as sentinels: a small timepiece or chronometer, to be carried in the pocket or about the person; the period during which a division of the crew is on duty on deck. To be on the watch, to be looking steadily for some event. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  47. To guard; to have in keeping; to lie in wait for; to tend; to note carefully. To watch over, to be cautiously observant of. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  48. To be or keep awake; to be attentive; to look with expectation; to keep guard; to act as sentinel; to be vigilant; to be insidiously attentive; to attend on the sick during the night. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  49. Attendance without sleep; close observation; steady look-out; a person keeping guard; a sentinel; a guard; a space of time allotted to a guard to keep watch; a time-piece adapted for pocket-use. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  50. To be attentive; to look with attention; to keep guard; to lie in wait for; to observe attentively in order to detect or prevent; to attend on the sick during the night. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  51. A body of constables on duty on any particular night thelawdictionary.org
  52. To keep guard; to stand as sentinel; to be on guard at night, for thepreservation of the peace and good order. thelawdictionary.org
  53. To serve the purpose of a watchman by floating properly in its place; -- said of a buoy. mso.anu.edu.au
  54. To serve the purpose of a watchman by floating properly in its place; said of a buoy. dictgcide_fs
  55. woch, n. act of looking out: close observation: guard: one who watches or those who watch: a sentry: a pocket timepiece: the place where a guard is kept: a division of the night: time of watching, esp. in a ship, a division of a ship's crew into two or three sections, so that one set of men may have charge of the vessel while the others rest. (The day and night are divided into watches of four hours each, except the period from 4 to 8 P.M., which is divided into two dog-watches of two hours' duration each).--v.i. to look with attention: to keep guard: to look out: to attend the sick by night: to inspect, keep guard over (with over).--v.t. to keep in view: to give heed to: to have in keeping: to guard: to wait for, detect by lying in wait: (Shak.) to keep from sleep.--ns. WATCH'-BILL, a list of the officers and crew of a ship, as divided into watches, with their several stations; WATCH'-BOX, a sentry-box; WATCH'CASE, the outer case of a watch: (Shak.) a sentry-box; WATCH'-CLOCK, a watchman's clock; WATCH'-DOG, a dog kept to guard premises and property; WATCH'ER, one who watches; WATCH'-FIRE, a night-fire acting as a signal: a fire for the use of a watching-party, sentinels, scouts, &c.--adj. WATCH'FUL, careful to watch or observe: attentive: circumspect: cautious.--adv. WATCH'FULLY.--ns. WATCH'FULNESS; WATCH'-GLASS, a sand-glass: the glass covering of the face of a watch; WATCH'-GUARD, a watch-chain of any material; WATCH'-GUN, a gun fired at the changing of the watch, as on a ship; WATCH'-HOUSE, a house in which a guard is placed: a lock-up, detaining office; WATCH'-JEW'EL, a jewel used in the works of a watch for lessening friction; WATCH'-KEY, a key for winding a watch; WATCH'-LIGHT, a light used for watching or sitting up in the night; WATCH'-M[=A]K'ER, one who makes and repairs watches; WATCH'-M[=A]K'ING; WATCH'MAN, a man who watches or guards, esp. the streets of a city at night; WATCH'-MEET'ING, a religious meeting to welcome in the New Year, held on the night before, called the WATCH'-NIGHT; WATCH'-OFF'ICER, the officer in charge of the ship during a watch, also called OFFICER OF THE WATCH; WATCH'-P[=A]'PER, a round piece of paper, often decorated, put inside the outer case of a watch to prevent rubbing; WATCH'-POCK'ET, a small pocket for holding a watch; WATCH'-SPRING, the mainspring of a watch; WATCH'-TOW'ER, a tower on which a sentinel is placed to watch or keep guard against the approach of an enemy; WATCH'WORD, the password to be given to a watch or sentry: any signal: a maxim, rallying-cry.--WATCH AND WARD, the old custom of watching by night and by day in towns and cities: uninterrupted vigilance.--THE BLACK WATCH, the 42d and 73d Regiments, now the 1st and 2d Battalions of the Black Watch or Royal Highlanders. [A.S. wæcce--wacan, wake.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  56. Wakefulness at night (now rare; in the ww. of the night, while one lies awake; pass as a w. in the night, be soon forgotten); alert state, being on the look-out, vigilance, constant observation, attention to what may come, (keep w., a w., good or a good w.; w. & ward, orig. guard by night& day, now emphatic reduplication of w.; on the w., waiting usu. for expected or desired or feared occurrence), whence watchful a., watchfully adv., watchfulness n.; (Hist.) man or body of men charged with patrolling streets at night, guard (BLACK w., orig. an armed company); (Hist.) one of three or of four parts into which night was anciently divided (first &c. or evening &c. w.); four-hour spell of duty on board ship (DOG-w., 2-hr), one of the halves (starboard& port w. from position of men\'s bunks) into which ship\'s crew is divided to take alternate duty; small timepiece worked by coiled spring for carrying on person (STOP-w.); w.-case, outer metal case enclosing w.-works; w.-chain, metal w.-guard; w.-dog, employed to give alarm of burglars &c.; w.-fire, at night in camps &c.; w.-glass, disk covering face of w.; w.-guard, chain or string for securing w. on person; w.-key, instrument for winding up w.-works; w.-maker; watchman, (formerly, & still poet.) sentinel or member of street patrol, (now) man employed to look after empty building &c. at night; w.-night, last night of year as celebrated esp. by methodists with religious services; w.-oil, fine thin kind for lubricating w.-works &c.; w.-pocket, in garment esp. waistcoat, or separate for attachment to bed &c., holding w.; w.-spring, kind used in w.-works, also mainspring of w.; w.-stand, small pillar &c. for hanging w. on; w.-tower, post of observation usu. fortified; watchword, (formerly) military password, (now) phrase expressing briefly the principles of a party &c. (e.g. Peace, retrenchment, & reform). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  57. Remain awake for a purpose (now rare; watched all night by his side; w. & pray); be on the w., keep w., be vigilant, look out for opportunity &c., exercise protecting care over; keep eyes fixed on, keep under observation, follow observantly, (had him watched by detectives; if you don\'t w. it colloq., take care or precautions); look out for, bide, await, (opportunity; w. one\'s time, wait for right moment). Hence watcher n. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  58. watched pot never boils, strained expectation makes time seem long. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  59. [Akin to wake] A buoy floating on the surface is said to watch. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  60. [Akin to wake] The periods of time during which a W. remains on deck, viz. four hours each, divided by half-hourly bells, one for first half-hour, two for the next, and so on up to eight bells. Dog W., from 4 to 8 p.m., is divided into two watches of two hours each, so as to have a different night-W. every twenty-four hours. First W., 8 p.m. to midnight. Middle W., from midnight to 4 a.m. Morning W. from 4 a.m. to 8 a.m. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  61. n. [Anglo-Saxon] Act of watching ; forbearance of sleep ; close observation ; guard ; preservative or preventive vigilance ;-one who watches or those who watch : a sentry ; a guard ;- post or office of a watchman ; also, the place where he is posted;—the period of the night in which one person, or one set of persons, stands as sentinels ; hence, a division of the night ;—a small timepiece or chronometer to be carried in the pocket ;-in ships, an allotted portion of time, usually four hours, for watching or being on duty ;-that part of the officers and crew of a vessel who together attend to working her for an allotted time. Cabinet Dictionary

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