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Definitions of wave

  1. signal with the hands or nod; "She waved to her friends"; "He waved his hand hospitably" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. twist or roll into coils or ringlets; "curl my hair, please" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. move in a wavy pattern, as of curtains Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. one of a series of ridges that moves across the surface of a liquid (especially across a large body of water) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. an undulating curve Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. (physics) a progressive disturbance propagated without displacement of the medium itself Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. the act of signaling by a movement of the hand Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a movement like that of an ocean wave; "a wave of settlers"; "troops advancing in waves" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a hairdo that creates undulations in the hair Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. something that rises rapidly and dies away; "a wave of emotion swept over him"; "there was a sudden wave of buying before the market closed" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. set waves in; of hair Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. (physics) a movement up and down or back and forth Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. something that rises rapidly; "a wave of emotion swept over him"; "there was a sudden wave of buying before the market closed"; "a wave of conservatism in the country led by the hard right" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. a member of the women's reserve of the United States Navy; originally organized during World War II but now no longer a separate branch Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. a persistent and widespread unusual weather condition (especially of unusual temperatures) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. set waves in; "she asked the hairdresser to wave her hair" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. move or swing back and forth; "She waved her gun" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. move in a wavy pattern or with a rising and falling motion; "The curtains undulated"; "the waves rolled towards the beach" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. Something resembling or likened to a water wave, as in rising unusually high, in being of unusual extent, or in progressive motion; a swelling or excitement, as of feeling or energy; a tide; flood; period of intensity, usual activity, or the like; as, a wave of enthusiasm. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. See Waive. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To play loosely; to move like a wave, one way and the other; to float; to flutter; to undulate. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To be moved to and fro as a signal. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To fluctuate; to waver; to be in an unsettled state; to vacillate. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To move one way and the other; to brandish. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To raise into inequalities of surface; to give an undulating form a surface to. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To move like a wave, or by floating; to waft. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To call attention to, or give a direction or command to, by a waving motion, as of the hand; to signify by waving; to beckon; to signal; to indicate. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. An advancing ridge or swell on the surface of a liquid, as of the sea, resulting from the oscillatory motion of the particles composing it when disturbed by any force their position of rest; an undulation. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. Water; a body of water. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. Unevenness; inequality of surface. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. A waving or undulating motion; a signal made with the hand, a flag, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. The undulating line or streak of luster on cloth watered, or calendered, or on damask steel. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. Fig.: A swelling or excitement of thought, feeling, or energy; a tide; as, waves of enthusiasm. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. Woe. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  35. A swell on the surface of water; billow; vibrations by which sound, light, etc., are transmitted; a curving ridge on any surface; an up and down or back and forth motion. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  36. To be moved up and down or back and forth; to signal by such a motion; to have undulations, or curves; as, her hair waves beautifully. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  37. To swing; brandish; to cause to move to and fro; to signal by such a movement; to give an undulating, or curved, surface to. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  38. 1. A movement of particles in an elastic body, whether solid or fluid, whereby an advancing series of alternate elevations and depressions, or expansions and condensations, is produced. 2. The elevation of the pulse, felt by the finger, or represented graphically in the curved line of the sphygmogram. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  39. A ridge on the surface of water swaying or moving backwards and forwards: a state of vibration propagated through a system of particles: inequality of surface: a line or streak like a wave. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  40. To move like a wave: to play loosely: to be moved, as a signal or a flag: to fluctuate. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  41. To move backwards and forwards: to brandish: to waft or beckon: to raise into inequalities of surface. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  42. A moving ridge on the surface of a liquid; anything like a wave. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  43. To move, or be moved, like a wave; move backwards and forwards; fluctuate. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  44. To move to and fro in the air. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. To move with undulations, as water. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  46. A moving ridge on the surface of a liquid; an undulation of air or light; an undulating or wavy line. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. A moving swell on the surface of the water of the sea or a river caused by the wind; motion in a fluid substance like that of a wave in which one set of particles acts on the adjoining set with little or no permanent displacement; unevenness; inequality of surface; the wavy line or streak of lustre on cloth, watered and calendered. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  48. To raise into inequalities of surface; to move one way and the other; to brandish; to waft; to beckon; to direct by a waft or waving motion. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  49. To cast away; to reject; to quit; to depart from; to put off; to relinquish, as a right or privilege. See Waive. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  50. To play loosely; to move like a wave one way and the other; to float; to undulate; to be moved, as a signal. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  51. The alternate rising and falling of water above and below its natural level; a moving swell or volume of water; a billow; any motion or appearance resembling that of a wave. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  52. To move to and fro or up and down; to undulate; to play loosely; to raise into inequalities of surface; to direct by a waving motion; to beckon. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  53. Disturbance passing through medium. thelawdictionary.org
  54. A vibration propagated from particle to particle through a body or elastic medium, as in the transmission of sound; an assemblage of vibrating molecules in all phases of a vibration, with no phase repeated; a wave of vibration; an undulation. See Undulation. mso.anu.edu.au
  55. Something resembling or likened to a water wave, as in rising unusually high, in being of unusual extent, or in progressive motion; a swelling or excitement, as of feeling or energy; a tide; flood; period of intensity, usual activity, or the like; as, a wave of enthusiasm; waves of applause. dictgcide_fs
  56. w[=a]v, n. a ridge on the surface of water swaying or moving backwards and forwards: (poet.) the sea: a state of vibration propagated through a system of particles: inequality of surface: a line or streak like a wave: an undulation: a rush of anything: a gesture.--v.i. to move like a wave: to play loosely: to be moved, as a signal: to fluctuate.--v.t. to move backwards and forwards: to brandish: to waft or beckon: to raise into inequalities of surface.--p.adj. WAVED, showing a wavelike form or outline: undulating: (her.) indented: (nat. hist.) having on the margin a succession of curved segments or incisions.--n. WAVE'-LENGTH, the distance between the crests of adjacent waves.--adj. WAVE'LESS, free from waves: undisturbed.--n. WAVE'LET, a little wave.--adj. WAVE'LIKE.--ns. WAVE'-LINE, the outline, path, of a wave: the surface of the waves: the line made by a wave on the shore; WAVE'-LOAF, a loaf for a wave-offering; WAVE'-M[=O]'TION, undulatory movement; WAVE'-MOULD'ING (archit.), undulating moulding; WAVE'-OFF'ERING, an ancient Jewish custom of moving the hands in succession towards the four points of the compass in presenting certain offerings--opposed to the Heave-offering, in which the hands were only lifted up and lowered.--v.t. W[=A]'VER, to move to and fro: to shake: to falter: to be unsteady or undetermined: to be in danger of falling.--ns. W[=A]'VERER; W[=A]'VERING.--adv. W[=A]'VERINGLY, in a wavering or irresolute manner.--n. W[=A]'VERINGNESS.--adjs. W[=A]'VEROUS, W[=A]'VERY, unsteady.--n. WAVE'SON, goods floating on the sea after a shipwreck.--adj. WAVE'-WORN, worn or washed away by the waves.--ns. W[=A]'VINESS, the state or quality of being wavy; W[=A]'VING.--adj. W[=A]'VY, full of or rising in waves: playing to and fro: undulating.--HOT WAVE, WARM WAVE, a movement of heat or warmth onwards, generally eastward. [A.S. wafian, to wave; cf. Ice. vafra, to waver.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  57. Vibrate or be stirred with sinuous or sweeping motions like those of flag or tree or field of corn in wind, flutter, undulate; impart waving motion to (w. sword, brandish it as encouragement to followers &c.; w. one\'s hand often to person, in greeting or as signal); w. hand or thing held in it usu. to person, give direction thus to person to do, send (person) away thus, summon (person) nearer thus, direct (person) thus to do, express farewell &c. thus; give undulating surface or course or appearance to (hair of head, lines in drawing, &c), make wavy, (of hair, line, &c.) have such appearance, be wavy. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  58. Ridge of water between two depressions or (also breaker) long body of water curling into arched form& breaking on shore (the ww. or w. poet. & rhet., the sea, water); disturbance of the particles of a fluid medium e.g. water, air, ether, into a ridge-&-trough oscillation by which motion is propagated& heat, light, sound, electricity, &c., conveyed in some direction without corresponding advance or without any advance of the particles in the same direction, single curve in the course of such motion; temporary heightening of some influence or condition or feeling (a w. of enthusiasm, prosperity, depression; heat, cold, -w., rise or fall of temperature travelling over large area); undulating line or outline or surface, waviness; gesture of waving. Hence waveless a., wavelet n. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  59. A ridgelike elevation (accompanied by a corresponding depression) of the surface of a fluid which advances while the particles of the fluid have little or no onward motion; hence a cycle of rhythmical alternating movement. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  60. A vibratory motion transmitted through a medium, each particle of which vibrates, and in doing so causes the particle in front of it to vibrate in like manner ; so that a state of displacement travels on continually without limit, while the motion of each particle is a small or at least limited vibration. If we suppose the motion to be transmitted along a tube, there will be at any instant two points in its length the particles between which will have simultaneously the various velocities which each of them has successively : the distance between these points is the Length of the Wave ; the point furthest from the origin is the Front of the Wave ; the distance passed over by the front in a unit of time is the Velocity of the Wave ; the time in which one particle makes its vibration is the Period of the Wave ; the number of vibrations made in the unit of time is the Frequency ; the length, period, frequency, and velocity being independent of the amplitude of the vibration. If we suppose the wave transmitted in all directions through a medium, the front of the wave will be a surface, in most cases a spherical surface, with its centre in the origin of disturbance. The theory that light is due to the vibrations of the ether is the Wave theory or Undidatory theory of light ; when light passes through a biaxal crystal, the form of the front of the wave is that of a complicated surface called the Wave surface. See Vibration. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy

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