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Definitions of wear

  1. covering designed to be worn on a person's body Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. put clothing on one's body; "What should I wear today?"; "He put on his best suit for the wedding"; "The princess donned a long blue dress"; "The queen assumed the stately robes"; "He got into his jeans" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. have on one's person; "He wore a red ribbon"; "bear a scar" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. go to pieces; "The lawn mower finally broke"; "The gears wore out"; "The old chair finally fell apart completely" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. last and be usable; "This dress wore well for almost ten years" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. exhaust or tire though overuse or great strain or stress; "We wore ourselves out on this hike" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. be dressed in; "She was wearing yellow that day" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. have in one's aspect; wear an expression of one's attitude or personality; "He always wears a smile" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. the act of having on your person as a covering or adornment; "she bought it for everyday wear" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. impairment resulting from long use; "the tires showed uneven wear" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. have or show an appearance of; "wear one's hair in a certain way" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. deteriorate through use or stress; "The constant friction wore out the cloth" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. a covering designed to be worn on a person's body Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. exhaust or tire through overuse or great strain or stress; "We wore ourselves out on this hike" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. Wore. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. The result of wearing or use; consumption, diminution, or impairment due to use, friction, or the like; as, the wear of this coat has been good. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Same as Weir. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To cause to go about, as a vessel, by putting the helm up, instead of alee as in tacking, so that the vessel's bow is turned away from, and her stern is presented to, the wind, and, as she turns still farther, her sails fill on the other side; to veer. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To carry or bear upon the person; to bear upon one's self, as an article of clothing, decoration, warfare, bondage, etc.; to have appendant to one's body; to have on; as, to wear a coat; to wear a shackle. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To have or exhibit an appearance of, as an aspect or manner; to bear; as, she wears a smile on her countenance. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To use up by carrying or having upon one's self; hence, to consume by use; to waste; to use up; as, to wear clothes rapidly. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To impair, waste, or diminish, by continual attrition, scraping, percussion, on the like; to consume gradually; to cause to lower or disappear; to spend. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To cause or make by friction or wasting; as, to wear a channel; to wear a hole. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To form or shape by, or as by, attrition. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To be wasted, consumed, or diminished, by being used; to suffer injury, loss, or extinction by use or time; to decay, or be spent, gradually. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. The act of wearing, or the state of being worn; consumption by use; diminution by friction; as, the wear of a garment. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. The thing worn; style of dress; the fashion. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. A dam in a river to stop and raise the water, for the purpose of conducting it to a mill, forming a fish pond, or the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. A fence of stakes, brushwood, or the like, set in a stream, tideway, or inlet of the sea, for taking fish. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To endure or suffer use; to last under employment; to bear the consequences of use, as waste, consumption, or attrition; as, a coat wears well or ill; - hence, sometimes applied to character, qualifications, etc.; as, a man wears well as an acquaintance. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. A long notch with a horizontal edge, as in the top of a vertical plate or plank, through which water flows, - used in measuring the quantity of flowing water. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. To carry on the body; as, to wear clothing; bear or show; as, to wear a careless manner; use up; make less in quantity or value; as, to wear out one's patience; to damage by continual friction; to make by use of friction; to turn a ship. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. To be exhausted or damaged by use; to last well under use. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  34. The state of being used; damage caused by use; garments worn; as, this shop sells ladies wear. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  35. Wearer. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. Worn. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  37. Wearing. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  38. To carry on the body: to have the appearance of: to consume by use, time, or exposure: to waste by rubbing: to do by degrees. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  39. To be wasted by use or time: to be spent tediously: to consume slowly: to last under use:-pa.t. wore; pa.p. worn. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  40. Act of wearing: lessening or injury by use or friction. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  41. To put a ship on another tack. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  42. Another spelling of WEIR. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  43. Act of wearing; thing worn. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  44. Dam in a river; fence for confining fish. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  45. To be wasted by use or time; to last under use. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  46. To carry on the body; have, as an appearance: waste by use or friction: put on another tack, as a ship. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  47. Were. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  48. To carry on the person; have on; maintain; exhibit. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  49. To impair by use; efface or rub off. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  50. To be impaired gradually by use. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  51. To bear using; endure. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  52. To go about with the wind astern. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  53. The act of wearing, or the state of being worn. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  54. Impairment from use or time. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  55. The act of wearing; diminution by friction; the thing worn; a dam in a river. Wear and tear, the loss by wearing, as of machinery in use. See Weir. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  56. To waste or impair by attrition; to lessen or diminish by time, use, or instruments; to carry appendant to the body; to have or exhibit; to affect by degrees. To wear away, to consume or diminish. To wear off, to diminish by attrition. To wear out, to render useless by attrition or decay; to consume tediously; to waste the strength of; to harass. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  57. To put a ship on the other tack by turning her round, with stern toward the wind. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  58. To be wasted; to be diminished by attrition; to be spent tediously; to be consumed by slow degrees; to advance by slow degrees. To wear off, to pass away by degrees. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  59. To last; to endure or hold out; to waste or diminish by use or time; to be wasted or impaired, as by use; to pass or be consumed by slow degrees. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  60. Injury or decay by use; the act of lasting long. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  61. To carry or bear upon the person, as an article of clothing, arms, or any ornament; to have or exhibit an appearance of; to bear. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  62. Used in the phrase, "to wear a ship,"-that is, to turn the ship before the wind. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  63. A great dam or fence made across a river, or against water, formedof stakes interlaced by twigs of osier, aud accommodated for tlie taking of fish, or toconvey a stream to a mill. Cowell; Jacob. thelawdictionary.org
  64. To endure or suffer use; to last under employment; to bear the consequences of use, as waste, consumption, or attrition; as, a coat wears well or ill; -- hence, sometimes applied to character, qualifications, etc.; as, a man wears well as an acquaintance. mso.anu.edu.au
  65. A long notch with a horizontal edge, as in the top of a vertical plate or plank, through which water flows, -- used in measuring the quantity of flowing water. mso.anu.edu.au
  66. To endure or suffer use; to last under employment; to bear the consequences of use, as waste, consumption, or attrition; as, a coat wears well or ill; hence, sometimes applied to character, qualifications, etc.; as, a man wears well as an acquaintance. dictgcide_fs
  67. A long notch with a horizontal edge, as in the top of a vertical plate or plank, through which water flows, used in measuring the quantity of flowing water. dictgcide_fs
  68. w[=a]r, v.t. to carry on the body: to have the appearance of: to consume by use, time, or exposure: to waste by rubbing: to do by degrees: to exhaust, efface: (naut.) to veer.--v.i. to be wasted by use or time: to be spent tediously: to consume slowly: to last under use: (Shak.) to be in fashion, to become accustomed: (naut.) to come round away from the wind: (obs.) to become:--pa.t. w[=o]re; pa.p. w[=o]rn.--n. act of wearing: lessening or injury by use or friction: article worn.--adj. WEAR'ABLE, fit to be worn.--n. WEAR'ER.--p.adj. WEAR'ING, made or designed for wear: consuming, exhausting.--n. the process of wasting by attrition or time: that which is worn, clothes.--ns. WEAR'ING-APPAR'EL, dress; WEAR'-[=I]'RON, a friction-guard.--WEAR AND TEAR, loss by wear or use; WEAR AWAY, to impair, consume; WEAR OFF, to rub off by friction: to diminish by decay: to pass away by degrees; WEAR OUT, to impair by use: to render useless by decay: to consume tediously: to harass. [A.S. werian, to wear; Ice. verja, to cover, Goth. wasjan.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  69. w[=e]r, n. another spelling of weir. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  70. w[=e]r, v.t. (obs.) to guard, ward off: to guide. [A.S. werian, to guard, from root of wary.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  71. (wore, worn). Be dressed habitually in, have on, carry or exhibit on one\'s person or some part of it, (wears green, serge, knickerbockers, &c., as usual colour &c.); is wearing diamonds, on this occasion; worn clothes, that have been put on at least once; w. the crown, sword, gown, willow, breeches, be a monarch or martyr, soldier, lawyer, desolate lover, husband-ruling wife; w. one\'s hair long, short, &c.; w. a face of joy, sour look, &c.; w. HEART on sleeve; w. person or principle in one\'s heart, be devoted to; w. one\'s years well, remain young-looking), whence wearer n.; injure surface of, partly consume or obliterate, damage, attenuate, or alter, by rubbing or use, suffer such injury or consumption or change, come or bring into specified state by use, rub (t. & i.) off or out or away or down, (step worn with pilgrims\' knees; worn clothes, the worse for wear; inscription has been worn, or has worn, away; w. the freshness, the nap, off; impression soon wears off; clothes w. to one\'s shape, fit better with use; w. one\'s trousers, trousers have worn, into holes or bagginess; seams w. white, ragged, threadbare; is worn to a shadow with care; stick wears down to a stump; a worn or well-worn joke, stale; w. out, use or be used till usable no longer); exhaust, tire or be tired out, put down by persistence, (worn with travel; a wearing occupation, companion, &c.; w. out one\'s welcome, go too often or stay too long as visitor &c.; his patience wore, or was worn, out at last; succeeded in wearing down opposition); endure continued use well, badly, &c., remain specified time in working order or presentable state, last long, (won\'t w., of inferior material, transitory impression, &c.; wears for years; person wears well, retains youthful strength or esp. look); (of time) go slowly or tediously on, pass (t. & i. of time) gradually away, (winter, time, day, wears on or away; w. away or out one\'s life or time or youth in trifles; w. through the day, get through it somehow); make (hole, groove, channel) by attrition (usu. of incidental or undesigned action, cf. BORE; often of water); wearing-apparel, clothes; wearing-iron or -plate, piece of metal attached to protect surface exposed to friction. Hence wearable a. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  72. Wearing or being worn on person, use as clothes, (the best materials for Sunday, working, spring, seaside, &c., w.; serges are now in general w., fashionable; the coat I have in w., am regularly wearing); thing to w., fashionable or suitable apparel, (in phrr. on type of motley\'s the only w.; also in foot &c. -w. chiefly in trade use as collective for things worn on feet &c.); damage sustained as result of ordinary use (esp. w. & tear; will stand any amount of w.; is the worse for w., damaged by use); capacity for resisting w. & tear (there is a great deal of, no, w. in it). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  73. (naut.; past& p.p. wore). Bring (ship), (of ship) come, about by putting down of helm (cf. tack). Concise Oxford Dictionary

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