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Definitions of weather

  1. the meteorological conditions: temperature and wind and clouds and precipitation; "they were hoping for good weather"; "every day we have weather conditions and yesterday was no exception" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. face or endure with courage; "She braved the elements" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. towards the side exposed to wind Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. change under the action or influence of the weather; "A weathered old hut" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. sail to the windward of Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. cause to slope Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. The state of the air or atmosphere with respect to heat or cold, wetness or dryness, calm or storm, clearness or cloudiness, or any other meteorological phenomena; meteorological condition of the atmosphere; as, warm weather; cold weather; wet weather; dry weather, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Vicissitude of season; meteorological change; alternation of the state of the air. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Storm; tempest. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A light rain; a shower. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To expose to the air; to air; to season by exposure to air. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Hence, to sustain the trying effect of; to bear up against and overcome; to sustain; to endure; to resist; as, to weather the storm. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To sail or pass to the windward of; as, to weather a cape; to weather another ship. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To place (a hawk) unhooded in the open air. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To undergo or endure the action of the atmosphere; to suffer meteorological influences; sometimes, to wear away, or alter, under atmospheric influences; to suffer waste by weather. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Being toward the wind, or windward - opposed to lee; as, weather bow, weather braces, weather gauge, weather lifts, weather quarter, weather shrouds, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. The state of the atmosphere as to cold. heat wet, dryness, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. To expose to, or season by exposure to, the air; sail to the windward of; resist bravely, as a storm. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. To undergo change by the action of the air, rain, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. State of the air as to heat or cold, dryness or wetness, etc. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. To affect by exposing to the air: to sail to the windward of: to gain or pass, as a promontory or cape: to hold out stoutly against difficulties. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. State of the atmosphere. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. To sail to the wind-ward of; pass securely through. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. To pass successfully; survive. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. To expose to the weather. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. To go to the wind ward of. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. Atmospheric conditions, as regards heat, cold, dampness, rain, winds, storms, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. Toward the wind; windward; as, weather-bow. Stress of weather, violent winds; force of tempests. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. The state of the air or atmosphere with respect to heat, cold, wetness, dryness, cloudiness, or any other meteorological phenomena; change of the state of the air; change. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To expose to the air; to disintegrate by exposure to the air: to sail to the windward of; to bear up against, as to weather the storm. To weather a point, to gain or accomplish it against opposition. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. The state of the atmosphere with respect to heat, cold, wetness, dryness, &c. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. Among seamen, to sail against the wind past something, as a ship doubling a cape or promontory; to bear up against; to endure and resist; to gain against opposition. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. Hour by hour and day by day variations in conditions of atmosphere. thelawdictionary.org
  34. Being toward the wind, or windward -- opposed to lee; as, weather bow, weather braces, weather gauge, weather lifts, weather quarter, weather shrouds, etc. mso.anu.edu.au
  35. Being toward the wind, or windward opposed to lee; as, weather bow, weather braces, weather gauge, weather lifts, weather quarter, weather shrouds, etc. dictgcide_fs
  36. weth'[.e]r, n. state of the air as to heat or cold, dryness, wetness, cloudiness, &c.--v.t. to affect by exposing to the air: to sail to the windward of: to gain or pass, as a promontory or cape: to hold out stoutly against difficulties.--v.i. to become discoloured by exposure.--adj. (naut.) toward the wind, windward.--adjs. WEATH'ER-BEAT'EN, distressed or seasoned by the weather; WEATH'ER-BIT'TEN, worn or defaced by exposure to the winds.--n. WEATH'ER-BOARD, the windward side of a ship: a plank in the port of a laid-up vessel placed so as to keep off rain, without preventing air to circulate.--v.t. to fit with such planks.--n. WEATH'ER-BOARD'ING, thin boards placed overlapping to keep out rain: exterior covering of a wall or roof.--adj. WEATH'ER-BOUND, delayed by bad weather.--ns. WEATH'ER-BOX, -HOUSE, a toy constructed on the principle of a barometer, consisting of a house with the figures of a man and wife who come out alternately as the weather is respectively bad or good; WEATH'ER-CLOTH, a tarpaulin protecting boats, hammocks, &c.; WEATH'ERCOCK, a vane (often in the form of a cock) to show the direction of the wind: anything turning easily and often.--v.t. to act as a weathercock for.--p.adj. WEATH'ER-DRIV'EN, driven by winds or storms.--adj. WEATH'ERED (archit.), made slightly sloping, so as to throw off water: (geol.) having the surface altered in colour, form, texture, or composition by the action of the elements.--n. WEATH'ER-EYE, the eye considered as the means by which one forecasts the weather.--v.t. WEATH'ER-FEND (Shak.), to defend from the weather, to shelter.--ns. WEATH'ER-GAGE, the position of a ship to the windward of another: advantage of position; WEATH'ER-GLASS, a glass or instrument that indicates the changes of the weather: a barometer; WEATH'ER-GLEAM (prov.), a bright aspect of the sky at the horizon; WEATH'ER-HELM, a keeping of the helm somewhat a-weather when a vessel shows a tendency to come into the wind while sailing; WEATH'ERING (archit.), a slight inclination given to the top of a cornice or moulding, to prevent water from lodging on it: (geol.) the action of the elements in altering the form, colour, texture, or composition of rocks.--adj. WEATH'ERLY (naut.), making little leeway when close-hauled.--n. WEATH'ER-MAP, a map indicating meteorological conditions over a large tract of country.--adj. WEATH'ERMOST, farthest to windward.--n. WEATH'ER-NOT[=A]'TION, a system of abbreviation for meteorological phenomena.--adj. WEATH'ER-PROOF, proof against rough weather.--ns. WEATH'ER-PROPH'ET, one who foretells weather: a device for foretelling the weather; WEATH'ER-ROLL, the lurch of a vessel to windward when in the trough of the sea; WEATH'ER-SER'VICE, an institution for superintending and utilising observed meteorological phenomena; WEATH'ER-SIDE, the windward side; WEATH'ER-SIGN, a phenomenon indicating change of weather: any prognostic; WEATH'ER-STAIN, discolouration produced by exposure; WEATH'ER-ST[=A]'TION, a station where phenomena of weather are observed; WEATH'ER-STRIP, a thin piece of some material used to keep out wind and cold; WEATH'ER-SYM'BOL, a conventional sign indicating some meteorological phenomenon.--adjs. WEATH'ER-WISE, wise or skilful in foreseeing the changes or state of the weather; WEATH'ER-WORN, worn by exposure to the weather.--WEATHER ANCHOR, the anchor lying to windward; WEATHER A POINT, to gain an advantage or accomplish a purpose against opposition; WEATHER OUT (obs.), to hold out against till the end.--KEEP ONE'S WEATHER EYE OPEN, to be on one's guard, to have one's wits in readiness; MAKE FAIR WEATHER (Shak.), to conciliate: to flatter; STRESS OF WEATHER, violent and especially unfavourable winds, force of tempests. [A.S. weder; Ice. vedhr, Ger. wetter.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  37. Atmospheric conditions prevailing at a place& time, combination produced by heat or cold, clearness or cloudiness, dryness or moisture, wind or calm, high or low pressure, & electrical state, of local air& sky, (April w., showers alternating with sunshine, fig. smiles& tears; FAIR, FOUL, DIRTY, FINE, SOFT, w.; favourable, seasonable, good, bad, &c., w; under stress of w., owing to storms &c.; CLERK of the w.; make good or bad w. naut., meet with); w.-beaten, seasoned by or bearing the marks of exposure to storms; w.-board, supply with w.-boarding, -boards, horizontal boards of which each overlaps the next below to throw off rain as protective casing to wall &c.; w.-bound, unable to proceed owing to bad w.; w.-box, w.-indicator with figures of man& woman, one issuing to foreshow rain, the other fine w.; w.-bureau, meteorological office; w.-chart, diagram showing details of w. over wide area; weathercock, revolving pointer often in shape of cock mounted in high place esp. on church spire to show whence wind blows, (fig.) inconstant person; w.-contact or -cross, leakage from one telegraph wire to another due to wet w.; w.-forecast, prophecy of the day\'s w. posted at w.-bureau or printed in newspaper; w.-glass, barometer; w.-map, = w.-chart; w.-moulding, dripstone; w.-PROOF; w.-prophet, person who foretells w.; w.-service, organization for meteorological observations; w.-stain, discolouration of wall &c. by exposure; so w.-stained; w.-station, post of observation in connexion with w.-service; w.-strip, piece of material used to make door or window proof against rain or wind; w.-tiles, arranged to overlap like w.-boarding; w.-wise, able to forecast w.; w.-worn, marked by storms &c.; w.-vane, = weathercock. (Adj., naut.) windward (on the w. quarter, beam, bow, &c.; have the w. gage or GAUGE of; keep one\'s w. eye open fig., be on the look-out); hence weathermost a. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  38. Expose to atmospheric changes; (usu. in pass.) discolour or partly disintegrate (rock, stones) by exposure to air (esp. in Geol.); be discoloured or worn thus; (of ship or its crew) get to windward of (cape &c.); come safely through (storm lit. or fig.); make (boards, tiles) overlap downwards, whence weathering n. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  39. (Naut.) The side nearest the wind. Opposed to Lee (q.v. ). IV. tide, opposite of Lee tide (q.v.). IV. gage. See Gage. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy

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