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Definitions of weave

  1. interlace as if weaving Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. to move or cause to move in a sinuous, spiral, or circular course; "the river winds through the hills"; "the path meanders through the vineyards"; "sometimes, the gout wanders through the entire body" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. of textiles; create a piece of cloth by interlacing strands of fabric, such as wool or cotton Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. sway to and fro Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. pattern of weaving or structure of a fabric Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. interlace by or as it by weaving Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7. create a piece of cloth by interlacing strands of fabric, such as wool or cotton; "tissue textiles" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. To unite, as threads of any kind, in such a manner as to form a texture; to entwine or interlace into a fabric; as, to weave wool, silk, etc.; hence, to unite by close connection or intermixture; to unite intimately. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To form, as cloth, by interlacing threads; to compose, as a texture of any kind, by putting together textile materials; as, to weave broadcloth; to weave a carpet; hence, to form into a fabric; to compose; to fabricate; as, to weave the plot of a story. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To practice weaving; to work with a loom. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To become woven or interwoven. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A particular method or pattern of weaving; as, the cassimere weave. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To twist or interlace, as threads, together; form, as cloth, in a loom; compose, as a story. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. To practice making cloth with a loom; to become twisted together or interlaced. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. A special pattern made in a loom. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. To twine threads together: to unite threads in a loom to form cloth: to work into a fabric: to unite by intermixture. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. To practice weaving:-pa.t. wove, (rarely) weaved; pa.p. woven. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  18. To practise weaving. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  19. To unite, as threads, to form a fabric: to make, as a fabric, out of threads. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  20. Wove. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  21. Woven. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  22. To entwine, as threads, in a loom; make, as a fabric, by this process. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. Weaver. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. To twine threads of any kind in such a manner as to form cloth; to entwine anything flexible; to unite by intermixture or close connection; to interpose; to insert. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. To practise weaving; to work with a loom. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. To form in a loom, as cloth; to unite by intermixture; to entwine; to work at the loom. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. w[=e]v, v.t. to twine threads together: to unite threads in a loom to form cloth: to work into a fabric: to unite by intermixture: to construct, contrive.--v.i. to practise weaving:--pa.t. w[=o]ve, (rarely) weaved; pa.p. w[=o]v'en.--ns. WEAV'ER; WEAV'ER-BIRD, a family of Passerine birds resembling the finches, so called from their remarkably woven nests; WEAV'ING, the act or art of forming a web or cloth by the intersecting of two distinct sets of fibres, threads, or yarns--those passing longitudinally from end to end of the web forming the warp, those crossing and intersecting the warp at right angles forming the weft. [A.S. wefan; Ice. vefa, Ger. weben; cog. with Gr. hupp[=e], a web, huphainein, to weave.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  28. w[=e]v, v.t. and v.i. (Spens.) waved, floated. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  29. (wove, woven&, chiefly in some trade phrr., wove), &n. form (thread &c.) into fabric, (fabric) out of thread &c., by interlacing, make fabric thus, work at loom; work up (facts &c.), introduce (details), into a story or connected whole, fashion (tale, poem, &c.); contrive (plot); wove (n) paper, with uniform unlined surface given by making in frame of crossed wire-gauze; (n.) style of weaving. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary

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