Spellcheck.net

Definitions of weigh

  1. show consideration for; take into account; "You must consider her age"; "The judge considered the offender's youth and was lenient" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. determine the weight of; "The butcher weighed the chicken" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. have weight; have import, carry weight; "It does not matter much" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. have a certain weight Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. to be oppressive or burdensome; "weigh heavily on the mind", "Something pressed on his mind" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. A corruption of Way, used only in the phrase under weigh. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To bear up; to raise; to lift into the air; to swing up; as, to weigh anchor. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To examine by the balance; to ascertain the weight of, that is, the force with which a thing tends to the center of the earth; to determine the heaviness, or quantity of matter of; as, to weigh sugar; to weigh gold. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To be equivalent to in weight; to counterbalance; to have the heaviness of. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To pay, allot, take, or give by weight. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To examine or test as if by the balance; to ponder in the mind; to consider or examine for the purpose of forming an opinion or coming to a conclusion; to estimate deliberately and maturely; to balance. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To consider as worthy of notice; to regard. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To have weight; to be heavy. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To be considered as important; to have weight in the intellectual balance. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To bear heavily; to press hard. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To judge; to estimate. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A certain quantity estimated by weight; an English measure of weight. See Wey. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To find the heaviness of; examine by a scale or balance; to ponder; reflect on carefully; to raise: used only in to weigh anchor. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. To have a given heaviness; to bear heavily; to be of importance. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. Weigher. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  21. To compare by the balance: to find the heaviness of: to be equal to in heaviness: to bear up, to raise, esp. a ship's anchor: to ponder in the mind: to consider worthy of notice. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. To have weight: to be considered of importance: to press heavily. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. To find the heaviness of; to be as heavy as: to raise: to ponder; consider. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. To have weight; to press heavily. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. To find the weight of. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. To estimate the worth or importance of. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. To press upon heavily; burden. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. To lift up, as an anchor. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. To have a specified weight. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. To be of value; avail. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. To raise anchor. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. A certain quantity by weight. See Wey. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  33. To examine by the balance; to ascertain the weight of; to be equivalent in weight to; to raise; to lift, as an anchor from the ground, or any other body; to pay, allot, or take by weight; to ponder in the mind; to consider or examine for the purpose of coming to a conclusion; to compare by the scales; to consider as worthy of notice. To weigh down, to overbalance; to depress. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  34. To have weight; to be considered as important; to bear heavily; to press hard. To weigh down, to sink by its own weight. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  35. To examine or compare with a fixed standard by means of a balance; to have weight; to be equivalent to in weight, as it weighs a pound; to sink, as by its own weight; to ascertain the heaviness of by actual trial; to raise; to lift, as an anchor; to ponder in the mind; to be considered as important; to bear or press heavily; to depress. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  36. w[=a], n. a very common misspelling of way in the phrase 'Under way,' through confusion with the phrase 'To weigh anchor.' gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  37. Find weight of with scales or other machine, whence weighage (4) n., balance in hands (as if) to guess weight of, (w. sugar, luggage; meditatively weighed his stick in his hand; w. out, take definite weight of, take specified weight from larger quantity, distribute in definite quantities, by aid of scales, as w. out butter, portions or 3 lb. of butter), ascertain one\'s own weight (when did you w. last?; w. out, in, of jockey before& after race, fig. w. in with argument &c, produce it triumphantly); estimate relative value or importance of, compare with or against or abs., consider with a view to choice or rejection or preference, (w. consequences, pros& cons, oath or argument with or against another; w. one\'s words, select such as express neither more nor less than one means; w. the claims, merits, &c., of rival candidates); be equal to or balance (specified weight) in the scales, (fig.) have specified importance, exercise pressure or influence, have weight or importance, be heavy or burdensome, (weighs a ton, 6 oz., little, nothing, light, heavy, heavily; w. heavy &c., or abs., upon, be burdensome or depressing to; the point that weighs with me); bring down by weight lit. or fig., (of counterweight) force up, (fruit weighs down branch; one good argument weighs down six bad ones; weighed down with cares; bucket is weighed up by mass of iron at end of lever); raise from below water (w. anchor, start for voyage; w. ship rare, refloat it when sunk); w.-beam, portable steelyard suspended in frame; w.-bridge, weighing-machine with plate on to which horse& cart can be driven to be weighed; w.-house, building in which goods can be weighed officially; w.-lock, canal lock with provision for weighing barges; weighing-machine, usu. for great weights or of more complicated mechanism than simple balance. (N.) process or occasion of weighing; under w., corruption of under WAY. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary

What are the misspellings for weigh?

X