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Definitions of well

  1. in a manner affording benefit or advantage; "she married well"; "The children were settled advantageously in Seattle" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. in financial comfort; "They live well"; "she has been able to live comfortably since her husband died" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. indicating high probability; in all likelihood; "I might well do it"; "a mistake that could easily have ended in disaster"; "you may well need your umbrella"; "he could equally well be trying to deceive us" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. to a great extent Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  5. an abundant source; "she was a well of information" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. (often used as a combining form) in a good or proper or satisfactory manner or to a high standard; "the children behaved well"; "a task well done"; "the party went well"; "he slept well"; "a well-argued thesis"; "a well-planned party"; (`good' is a nonstandard dialectal variant for `well' as in"the baby can walk pretty good") Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7. with great or especially intimate knowledge; "we knew them well" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. come up, as of liquids; "Tears well in her eyes" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a deep hole or shaft dug or drilled to obtain water or oil or gas or brine Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. an enclosed compartment in a ship or plane for holding something as e.g. fish or a plane's landing gear or for protecting something as e.g. a ship's pumps Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. an open shaft through the floors of a building (as for a stairway) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. a cavity or vessel used to contain liquid Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. without unusual distress or resentment; with good humor; "took the joke well"; "took the tragic news well" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. thoroughly or completely; fully; often used as a combining form; "The problem is well understood"; "she was well informed"; "shake well before using"; "in order to avoid food poisoning be sure the meat is well cooked"; "well-done beef", "well-satisfied customers"; "well-educated" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. to a suitable or appropriate extent or degree; "the project was well underway"; "the fetus has well developed organs"; "his father was well pleased with his grades" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. resulting favorably; "its a good thing that I wasn't there"; "it is good that you stayed"; "it is well that no one saw you"; "all's well that ends well" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. wise or advantageous and hence advisable; "it would be well to start early" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. come up; "Tears well in her eyes" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. in good health especially after having suffered illness or injury; "appears to be entirely well"; "the wound is nearly well"; "a well man"; "I think I'm well; at least I feel well" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. favorably; with approval; "their neighbors spoke well of them"; "he thought well of the book" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. with skill or in a pleasing manner; "she dances well"; "he writes well" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  22. with prudence or propriety; "You would do well to say nothing more"; "could not well refuse" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  23. (used for emphasis or as an intensifier) entirely or fully; "a book well worth reading"; "was well aware of the difficulties ahead"; "suspected only too well what might be going on" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  24. An issue of water from the earth; a spring; a fountain. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. A pit or hole sunk into the earth to such a depth as to reach a supply of water, generally of a cylindrical form, and often walled with stone or bricks to prevent the earth from caving in. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A shaft made in the earth to obtain oil or brine. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Fig.: A source of supply; fountain; wellspring. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. An inclosure in the middle of a vessel's hold, around the pumps, from the bottom to the lower deck, to preserve the pumps from damage and facilitate their inspection. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. A compartment in the middle of the hold of a fishing vessel, made tight at the sides, but having holes perforated in the bottom to let in water for the preservation of fish alive while they are transported to market. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. A vertical passage in the stern into which an auxiliary screw propeller may be drawn up out of water. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. A hole or excavation in the earth, in mining, from which run branches or galleries. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. An opening through the floors of a building, as for a staircase or an elevator; a wellhole. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. The lower part of a furnace, into which the metal falls. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. To issue forth, as water from the earth; to flow; to spring. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. To pour forth, as from a well. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. In a good or proper manner; justly; rightly; not ill or wickedly. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. Suitably to one's condition, to the occasion, or to a proposed end or use; suitably; abundantly; fully; adequately; thoroughly. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. In such manner as is desirable; so as one could wish; satisfactorily; favorably; advantageously; conveniently. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. Considerably; not a little; far. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. Good in condition or circumstances; desirable, either in a natural or moral sense; fortunate; convenient; advantageous; happy; as, it is well for the country that the crops did not fail; it is well that the mistake was discovered. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. Being in health; sound in body; not ailing, diseased, or sick; healthy; as, a well man; the patient is perfectly well. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. Being in favor; favored; fortunate. Webster Dictionary DB
  43. Safe; as, a chip warranted well at a certain day and place. Webster Dictionary DB
  44. A depressed space in the after part of the deck; - often called the cockpit. Webster Dictionary DB
  45. Fully or about; - used with numbers. Webster Dictionary DB
  46. A spring or fountain; a shaft sunk in the earth to reach a supply of water or other liquid, such as oil; some thing like a well in shape. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  47. To flow or pour forth as from a spring. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  48. Rightly; justly; suitably; favorably; fortunately; sufficiently; fully; as, well under way. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  49. In good condition or circumstances; fortunate; sound in body; healthy. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  50. In good health. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  51. A rise of water from the earth: a spring: a pit in the earth whence a supply of water is obtained: an inclosure in a ship's hold round the pumps: the open space in the middle of a staircase. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  52. To issue forth, as water from the earth: to spring. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  53. Good in condition: fortunate: in health. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  54. In a proper manner: rightly: thoroughly: favorably: conveniently. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  55. To pour forth. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  56. A spring; pit dug to water; inclosure round a ship's pumps. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  57. In a good state; in health. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  58. Rightly; properly; to a good degree; conveniently. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  59. To issue forth, as water from the earth. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  60. To flow up, as water in a spring. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  61. Suitable; fit; right. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  62. Having good health; free from trouble. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  63. A hole sunk into the earth for water, oil, or natural gas. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  64. A spring. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  65. A depression, cavity, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  66. Excellently; suitably; prosperously. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  67. Being in health; having a sound body, with all the organs in healthy action; fortunate; convenient; advantageous; happy. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  68. In a proper manner; justly; rightly: not ill or wickedly; skilfully; with due art; sufficiently; abundantly; to a degree that gives pleasure; favourably; with praise; conveniently; suitably; advantageously; perfectly; thoroughly; fully; adequately. As well as, together with; one as much as the other. Well enough, in a moderate degree. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  69. A spring; a fountain; water issuing from the earth; a pit, or cylindrical hole, sunk perpendicularly into the earth to reach a supply of water, and walled to prevent the earth caving in; an in-closure round the pumps in the middle of a ships hold; an apartment in a fishing boat to preserve fresh fish while they are transported to market; a hole or excavation in the earth, from which run branches or galleries; a source. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  70. To spring: to issue forth, as water from tbe earth. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  71. An English prefix expressing what is right, laudable or complete. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  72. Being in a state of health; fortunate; advantageous; recovered from a sickness. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  73. In a choice or desirable manner; justly; rightly; skilfully; very much; to a sufficient degree; perfectly; a word expressing satisfaction, or merely expletive,-as, "well, well, be it so"-"well, let us go"; as well as. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  74. Together with. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  75. A fountain of water; a deep narrow pit dug in the earth for the purpose of retaining spring or other water; an enclosure around the bottom of a ship's pumps; an enclosed space in a fishing-boat for keeping fish alive; in arch., the space in which winding stairs are placed; a deep excavation for military purposes. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  76. To pour forth, as from a spring; to issue forth, as water. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  77. adj. In marine insurance. Aterm used as descriptive of the safety and soundness of a vessel, in a warranty of hercondition at a particular time and place; as, "warranted well at on ."In the old reports. Good, sufficient, unobjectionable In law; the opposite of "ill." thelawdictionary.org
  78. A well, as the term is used in a conveyance, is an artificial excavation anderection in and upon land, which necessarily, from its nature and the mode of its use,includes and comprehends the substantial occupation and beneficial enjoyment of thewhole premises on which it is situated. Johnson v. Rayner, 6 Gray (Mass.) 197;Andrews v. Carman, 13 Blatchf. 307, 1 Fed. Cas. 8G8. thelawdictionary.org
  79. A depressed space in the after part of the deck; -- often called the cockpit. mso.anu.edu.au
  80. Fully or about; -- used with numbers. mso.anu.edu.au
  81. Wells in Palestine are usually excavated from the solid limestone rock, sometimes with steps to descend into them. ( Genesis 24:16 ) The brims are furnished with a curb or low wall of stone, bearing marks of high antiquity in the furrows worn by the ropes used in drawing water. It was on a curb of this sort that our Lord sat when he conversed with the woman of Samaria, ( John 4:6 ) and it was this, the usual stone cover, which the woman placed on the mouth of the well at Bahurim, ( 2 Samuel 17:19 ) where the Authorized Version weakens the sense by omitting the article. The usual methods for raising water are the following: 1. The rope and bucket, or waterskin. ( Genesis 24:14-20 ; John 4:11 ) 2. The sakiyeh , or Persian wheel. This consists of a vertical wheel furnished with a set of buckets or earthen jars attached to a cord passing over the wheel. which descend empty and return full as the wheel revolves. 3. A modification of the last method, by which a man, sitting opposite to a wheel furnished with buckets, turns it by drawing with his hands one set of spokes prolonged beyond its circumference, and pushing another set from him with his feet. 4. A method very common in both ancient and modern Egypt is the shadoof , a simple contrivance consisting of a lever moving on a pivot, which is loaded at one end with a lump of clay or some other weight, and has at the other a bowl or bucket. Wells are usually furnished with troughs of wood or stone into which the water is emptied for the use of persons or animals coming to the wells. Unless machinery is used, which is commonly worked by men, women are usually the water-carriers. biblestudytools.com
  82. (Heb. beer), to be distinguished from a fountain (Heb. 'ain). A "beer" was a deep shaft, bored far under the rocky surface by the art of man, which contained water which percolated through the strata in its sides. Such wells were those of Jacob and Beersheba, etc. (see Genesis 21:19 Genesis 21:25 Genesis 21:30 Genesis 21:31 ; 24:11 ; Genesis 26:15 Genesis 26:18-25 Genesis 26:32 , etc.). In the Pentateuch this word beer, so rendered, occurs twenty-five times. biblestudytools.com
  83. Fully or about; used with numbers. dictgcide_fs
  84. wel, n. a rise of water from the earth: a spring: a pit in the earth whence a supply of water is obtained: an enclosure in a ship's hold round the pumps: the open space in the middle of a staircase: a cavity: an eddy.--v.i. to issue forth, as water from the earth: to spring.--ns. WELL'-BOAT, -SMACK, a fishing-boat having a well; WELL'-BOR'ING, sinking wells by drilling through rock; WELL'-BUCK'ET, a vessel for drawing up water from a well; WELL'-CURB, the stone ring built round the mouth of a well; WELL'-DECK, an enclosed space on the deck of a ship; WELL'-DRAIN, a pit drawing the water from wet land; WELL'-DRESS'ING, the festal decoration of wells and springs, as at Tissington in Derbyshire on Ascension-day, &c.; WELL'-HEAD, the source of a spring; WELL'-HOLE, the pit or shaft of a well; WELL'-HOUSE, a room built over a well; WELL'ING, an outpouring; WELL'-ROOM, a room enclosing a mineral well: a cavity in a boat for collecting leakage and rain-water; WELL'-SINK'ER, one who digs wells; WELL'-SINK'ING, the act of boring for water; WELL'-SPRING, a fountain.--THE WELLS, any place where mineral wells are situated. [A.S. wella--weallan, to boil; cf. Ice. vella, to boil.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  85. wel, adj. good in condition: fortunate: comfortable: in health.--n. (Spens.) good health, fortune.--adv. in a proper manner: rightly: thoroughly: favourably: conveniently: to a considerable extent: conscientiously: so be it (as a sign of assent).--adjs. WELL'-ACQUAINT'ED, having intimate personal knowledge; WELL'-ADVISED', prudent.--adv. WELL'-ANEAR' (Shak.), very soon.--adj. WELL'-APPOINT'ED, in good trim.--n. WELL'-APPOINT'EDNESS'.--adjs. WELL'-BAL'ANCED, properly adjusted; WELL'-BEH[=A]VED', becoming in manner.--n. WELL'-B[=E]'ING, state of being well, welfare.--adjs. WELL'-BELOVED', very dear; WELL'-BESEEM'ING, properly becoming; WELL'-BESEEN' (Spens.), showy in appearance; WELL'-BORN, born of a good or respectable family: not of mean birth; WELL'-BREATHED, strong of lung; WELL'-BRED, educated to polished manners: of good stock; WELL'-CONDI'TIONED, in a desirable condition; WELL'-CONDUCT'ED, properly led: acting properly; WELL'-DISPOSED', favourable.--ns. WELL'-DO'ER, a benefactor; WELL'-DO'ING, a doing of what is right or good.--adjs. WELL'-EARNED, thoroughly deserved; WELL'-ED'UCATED, having a good education; WELL'-FAMED, famous; WELL-F[=A]'VOURED, good-looking; WELL'-FED, fat; WELL'-FOUND, commendable; WELL'-FOUND'ED, highly probable; WELL'-GRACED, popular; WELL'-GROUND'ED, very likely; WELL'-INFORMED', full of varied information; WELL'-INTEN'TIONED, of upright intentions or purpose; WELL'-JUDGED, correctly calculated; WELL'-KNIT, strongly framed; WELL'-KNOWN, fully known: celebrated: notorious; WELL'-LIK'ING (Shak.), in good condition: clever, smart; WELL'-LOOK'ING, good-looking; WELL'-MANN'ERED, polite: obedient; WELL'-MARKED, obvious, decided; WELL'-MEAN'ING, well-intentioned; WELL'-MEANT, rightly intended; WELL'-MIND'ED, favourably inclined.--adv. WELL'-NIGH, nearly: almost.--adjs. WELL'-OR'DERED, correctly governed; WELL'-PLEAS'ING, acceptable; WELL'-PLIGHT'ED (Spens.), well folded; WELL'-PROPOR'TIONED, having correct proportions; WELL'-READ, of extensive reading; WELL'-REG'ULATED, well-ordered; WELL'-RESPECT'ED, highly esteemed; WELL-ROUND'ED, symmetrical; WELL'-SEEN (Shak.), experienced, skilful; WELL'-SET, properly arranged: fitly put together; WELL'-SP[=O]'KEN, spoken properly: graceful in speech; WELL'-TEM'PERED (mus.), tuned in equal temperament; WELL'-THEWED (Spens.), well-educated, well-mannered, of good disposition; WELL'-TIM'BERED, furnished with much timber; WELL'-TIMED, opportune: keeping accurate time; WELL'-TO-DO, prosperous; WELL'-TURNED, accurately rounded or fashioned; WELL'-WARR'ANTED, having good credit.--ns. WELL'-WILL'ER, -WISH'ER, one who wills or wishes well.--adjs. WELL'-WISHED (Shak.), held in good-will; WELL'-WON, honestly gained; WELL'-WORN, worn threadbare: (rare) becomingly worn.--adv. WELL'Y (prov.), well-nigh.--WELL DONE, a word of praise, bravely! nobly! WELL ENOUGH, in a moderate but sufficient degree; WELL MET (see MEET); WELL OFF, in good circumstances; WELL SAID, well done! WELL UP (coll.), well versed in, well acquainted with (with in).--AS WELL AS (see AS); JUST AS WELL, all the same: so much the better. [A.S. wel; cog. with Goth. vaila, Ger. wohl, from the root of will.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  86. Spring or fountain, (fig.) source, (poet. or archaic); shaft sunk in ground& lined with stone or other protection for obtaining subterranean water, oil, &c. (ARTESIAN w.); enclosed space more or less resembling w.-shaft, space in middle of house from floor to roof containing stairs (also w.-staircase) or lift or surrounded by stairs (also w.-hole) or open for light& ventilation, railed space for counsel &c. in court, receptacle for ink in inkstand, &c.; w.-deck, space on main deck enclosed by bulwarks& higherdecks; w.-dish, with hollow for gravy to collect in; w.-head, source, fountain-head; w.-room, where spa-water is dispensed; w.-sinker, person whose occupation is sinking ww.; w.-spring,= w.-head. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  87. Spring (as) from fountain (often up, out, forth). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  88. (better, best), pred. a. (better, best), attrib. a. (no comp.), & n. In good manner or style, satisfactorily, rightly, (the work is w. done; that is w. said; a w. situated house; w. begun is half done; w. done!, run!, &c., cry of commendation; w. met!, greeting to person one has been wanting to see; come off w., have good luck, distinguish oneself; wish I was w. out of it, without disaster &c.; you did w., it was w. done of you, to come); thoroughly, with care or completeness, sufficiently, to a considerable distance or extent, with margin enough to justify description, quite, (look w. to yourself; judge w. & truly; smack him, polish it, w.; is w. up in the list, w. on in life, w. advanced or stricken in years, w. past forty, w. among the leaders of thought; as w., in addition, to an equal extent, not less truly, as but he is a christian as w., he gave me clothes as w. as food); heartily, kindly, laudatorily, approvingly, on good terms, (love, like, person w.; treat person w.; think or speak w. of; it speaks w. for his discipline that he never punishes, serves as commendation; stand w. with one, be in his good graces); probably, not incredibly, easily, with reason, wisely, advisably, (it may w. be that-; can, cannot, w. manage it; you may w. ask, say, that; we might w. make the experiment; as w., with equal reason, preferably, without worse consequences, as you might as w. throw your money into the sea as lend it to him, as w. be hanged for a sheep as a lamb, we may as w. begin at once; that is just as w., need not be regretted; you might as w., nursery formula of request). (Pred. a., often indistinguishable from adv.) in good health (is she w. or ill?; will soon be better; is best in the winter; quite w., thank you; am perfectly w.); in satisfactory state or position, satisfactory, advisable, (am very w. where I am; all\'s w.; it is all very w., ironical expression of discontent, or rejection of comfort, arguments, &c.; it is w. with him; it would have been, were, w., for him if; it would be w. to inquire; w. enough, tolerably good or good-looking; as w., not unadvisable, as it may be as w. to explain). (Attrib. adj., rare) in good health (a w. man should not be dawdling in bed; the w. are impatient of the sick). (N.) good things (I wish him w.); what is satisfactory (let w. alone, do not meddle needlessly). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  89. int. expressing great astonishment (w., who would have thought it?; well!: to be sure!), relief (w., here we are at last), concession (w., come if you like; w., perhaps you are right; w. then, say no more about it), resumption of talk (w., who was it?; w., he says he must see you), qualified recognition of point (w., but what about Jones?), expectation (w. then?), resignation (w., it can\'t be helped), &c. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  90. (esp. as formula of assent or approval; also iron. in menaces, as v.w., Master Tom, I shall tell your mamma); w. & good (formula of dispassionate acceptance of decision, as if you choose to take my advice, w. &g.). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  91. (Naut.) A compartment in the hold, in which the pumps work. Brake of the Well, handle of pump. To sound the Well, to ascertain the depth of water in it. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  92. (Naut.) A water-tight compartment in a boat or smack, to keep fish alive in. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy

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