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Definitions of wheel

  1. ride a bicycle Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a cycle that has two wheels; moved by foot pedals Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. an instrument of torture that stretches or disjoints or mutilates victims Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. game equipment consisting of a rotating wheel with slots that is used for gambling; players bet on which slot the roulette ball will stop in Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a handwheel that is used for steering Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. wheel somebody or something Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a simple machine consisting of a circular frame with spokes (or a solid disc) that can rotate on a shaft or axle (as in vehicles or other machines) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a circular helm to control the rudder of a vessel Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. move along on or as if on wheels or a wheeled vehicle; "The President's convoy rolled past the crowds" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. change directions as of revolving on a pivot; "They wheeled their horses around and left" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a wheeled vehicle that has two wheels and is moved by foot pedals Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. change directions as if revolving on a pivot; "They wheeled their horses around and left" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. A circular frame turning about an axis; a rotating disk, whether solid, or a frame composed of an outer rim, spokes or radii, and a central hub or nave, in which is inserted the axle, -- used for supporting and conveying vehicles, in machinery, and for various purposes; as, the wheel of a wagon, of a locomotive, of a mill, of a watch, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Any instrument having the form of, or chiefly consisting of, a wheel. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A spinning wheel. See under Spinning. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. An instrument of torture formerly used. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A circular frame having handles on the periphery, and an axle which is so connected with the tiller as to form a means of controlling the rudder for the purpose of steering. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A firework which, while burning, is caused to revolve on an axis by the reaction of the escaping gases. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. The burden or refrain of a song. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A bicycle or a tricycle; a velocipede. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A rolling or revolving body; anything of a circular form; a disk; an orb. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. A turn revolution; rotation; compass. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To convey on wheels, or in a wheeled vehicle; as, to wheel a load of hay or wood. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To put into a rotatory motion; to cause to turn or revolve; to cause to gyrate; to make or perform in a circle. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To turn on an axis, or as on an axis; to revolve; to more about; to rotate; to gyrate. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To change direction, as if revolving upon an axis or pivot; to turn; as, the troops wheeled to the right. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To go round in a circuit; to fetch a compass. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To roll forward. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. A circular frame or body capable of turning on a centrai axis or axle; anything shaped like a wheel; a circular frame, with handles, for controlling the rudder of a ship; a bicycle; an old instrument of torture; a circular revolving firework; a complete turning around; that which makes active or which directs progress; as, the wheels of business; a maneuver in drill in which troops in line change direction without destroying their alignment. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. To move on wheels; to cause to turn. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. To turn on an axis or about a center; to revolve; to roll forward. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  32. Wheeled. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. A circular frame turning on an axle: an old instrument of torture. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  34. To cause to whirl: to convey on wheels. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. To turn round or on an axis: to roll forward. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. A circular frame or disk turning on an axis. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  37. To convey on wheels; cause to turn. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  38. To turn; revolve. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  39. To carry or move on wheels; roll; turn; rotate; revolve. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. A circular framework or a disk, made to rotate on its axis. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. A wheeling; turning. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. A circular frame or a solid circular piece of wood or metal turning on an axis; a machine or contrivance in the shape of a wheel; a circular body; an instrument for torturing criminals; a machine for spinning thread of various kinds; rotation; revolution; a turning about; a round board turned by a lathe in a horizontal position, on which the clay is shaped by the hand of the potter; a revolving fire-work; a large circular frame having handles on the periphery, and connected by tiller-ropes with the rudder, for the purpose of steering the ship. To break on the wheel, to fasten to a revolving wheel and beat with an iron bar. Wheel and axle, one of the mechanical powers, consisting of a cylindrical axle, to which a wheel concentric with it is attached. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  43. To convey on wheels; to put into a rotary motion; to cause to turn round. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  44. To turn on an axis; to move round; to fetch a compass; to roll forward; to move forward or backward in a circular manner. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  45. A potter's wheel. See under Potter. Webster Dictionary DB
  46. A frame of wood or iron in the form of a circle, being arranged to turn on an axis; a turning about; an instr. on which criminals were tortured in some countries-see break. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  47. To move on wheels; to convey on wheels; to turn on an axis; to have a rotatory motion; to whirl; to move round; to cause to turn round. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  48. An engine of torture used in medieval Europe, on which a criminal wasbound while his limbs were broken one by one till he died. thelawdictionary.org
  49. (Heb. galgal; rendered "wheel" in Psalms 83:13 , and "a rolling thing" in Isaiah 17:13 ; RSV in both, "whirling dust"). This word has been supposed to mean the wild artichoke, which assumes the form of a globe, and in autumn breaks away from its roots, and is rolled about by the wind in some places in great numbers. biblestudytools.com
  50. A circular frame turning about an axis; a rotating disk, whether solid, or a frame composed of an outer rim, spokes or radii, and a central hub or nave, in which is inserted the axle, used for supporting and conveying vehicles, in machinery, and for various purposes; as, the wheel of a wagon, of a locomotive, of a mill, of a watch, etc. dictgcide_fs
  51. hw[=e]l, n. a circular frame turning on an axle: an old instrument of torture: a steering-wheel: (fig.) the course of events, from the wheel, one of the attributes of Fortune, the emblem of mutability: (coll.) a bicycle or tricycle: circular motion: principle of life or motion: (Shak.) a refrain: (pl.) chariot: (slang) a dollar.--v.t. to cause to whirl: to convey on wheels: to turn.--v.i. to turn round or on an axis: to roll forward: to change direction: to move in a circle: to change about: (coll.) to ride a bicycle or tricycle.--ns. WHEEL'-AN'IMAL, -ANIMAL'CULE, a rotifer; WHEEL'-BARROW, a barrow supported on one wheel and two handles, and driven forward by one man; WHEEL'-BOAT, a boat having wheels, for use on water or on inclined planes; WHEEL'-CARR'IAGE, any kind of carriage moved on wheels; WHEEL'-CHAIR, a chair moving on wheels.--adj. WHEEL'-CUT, cut, or ground and polished, on a wheel--of glass.--n. WHEEL'-CUT'TER, a machine for cutting the teeth on watch and clock wheels.--p.adj. WHEELED, having wheels.--ns. WHEEL'ER, one who wheels: the horse nearest the wheels of a carriage: a maker of wheels; WHEEL'-HORSE, one of the horses next the wheels in a team; WHEEL'-HOUSE, a box or small house erected over the steering-wheel in ships: a paddle-box; WHEEL'ING, the act of moving or conveying on wheels: a turning or circular movement of troops; WHEEL'-LOCK, a lock for firing a gun by means of a small steel wheel; WHEEL'MAN, a steersman: a cyclist; WHEEL'-PLOUGH, a plough the depth of whose furrow is regulated by a wheel; WHEEL'-RACE, the part of a race in which the water-wheel is fixed; WHEEL'-TAX, a tax on carriages; WHEEL'-WIN'DOW, a circular window with radiating tracery; WHEEL'-WORK, a combination of wheels and their connection in machinery; WHEEL'WRIGHT, a wright who makes wheels and wheel-carriages.--adj. WHEEL'Y, like a wheel.--WHEEL AND AXLE, one of the mechanical powers, in its primitive form a cylindrical axle, on which a wheel, concentric with the axle, is firmly fastened, the power being applied to the wheel, and the weight attached to the axis; WHEEL OF LIFE (see ZOETROPE); WHEELS WITHIN WHEELS, a complication of circumstances.--BREAK A BUTTERFLY (FLY, &c.) UPON THE WHEEL, to inflict a punishment out of all proportion to the offence: to employ great exertions for insignificant ends. [A.S. hwéol; Ice. hjól.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  52. Circular frame or disk arranged to revolve on axis& used to facilitate motion of vehicle or for various mechanical purposes, machine &c. of which a w. is an essential part, object resembling a w., (BALANCE, CATHERINE, COG, Fly, MILL, OVERSHOT, PADDLE, POTTER\'S, RATCHET, SPINNING, STEERING, SUN-&-planet, UNDERSHOT, -w.; eccentric w., turning on axis not at its centre; fifth w., apparatus enabling front wheels &c. of four-wheeled conveyance to be slewed, also see FIFTH w.; ww. within ww., intricate machinery, indirect or secret agencies; the ww. of life, the vital processes &c.; w. of life, scientific toy converting series of pictures of successive attitudes into semblance of continuous motion; Fortune\'s w., w. with which Fortune is depicted as symbol of ups& downs, also fig. vicissitudes; break on the w., maim& kill on mediaeval instrument of torture that revolved with victim bound on it; BREAK butterfly on w.; a Fly on the w.; put SPOKE in one\'s w., one\'s SHOULDER to the w.; w. & axle, utilization of leverage given by difference in circumference between w. & its axle, called one of the MECHANICAL powers; go on ww., smoothly), Fortune\'s w. (we may be rich at the next turn of the w.), steering-w. (don\'t speak to the man at the w.); motion as of w., circular motion, motion of line as on pivoted end esp. as military evolution, (street-arab turning ww. in the gutter; the ww. & summersaults of the gulls; right, left, &c., w., words of command to company &c. in line to swing round on right, left, flank as pivot); wheel BARROW; w.-chair, invalid\'s on ww.; w.-horse, wheeler; w.-house, steersman\'s shelter; w.-lock, (gun with) antiquated lock having steel wheel to rub against flint &c.; wheelman, cyclist; w.-seat, part of axle fitting into hub; w.-tread, part of carriage &c. w. that touches ground; w.-window, circular with spokelike tracery; w.-wright, maker of ww. Hence (-)wheeled, wheelless, aa. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  53. Swing (t. & i. of line of men &c.) round in line on one flank as pivot, (loosely) change direction lit. or fig., face another way, (often round); push or pull (wheeled thing esp. wheelbarrow or bath-chair or its load or occupant, or furniture on CASTORs) in some direction; go in circles or curves; ride on bicycle &c. Concise Oxford Dictionary

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