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Definitions of whole

  1. to a complete degree or to the full or entire extent; "he was wholly convinced"; "entirely satisfied with the meal"; "it was completely different from what we expected"; "was completely at fault"; "a totally new situation"; "the directions were all wrong"; "It was not altogether her fault"; "an altogether new approach"; (`whole' is often used informally for `wholly' as in"a whole new idea") Wordnet Dictionary DB
  2. exhibiting or restored to vigorous good health; "hale and hearty"; "whole in mind and body"; "a whole person again" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. an assemblage of parts that is regarded as a single entity; "how big is that part compared to the whole?"; "the team is a unit" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. all of something including all its component elements or parts; "Europe as a whole"; "the whole of American literature" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. including all components without exception; being one unit or constituting the full amount or extent or duration; complete; "gave his whole attention"; "a whole wardrobe for the tropics"; "the whole hog"; "a whole week"; "the baby cried the whole trip home"; "a whole loaf of bread" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. (of siblings) having the same parents; "whole brothers and sisters" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. all of something including all its component elements or parts; "Europe considered as a whole"; "the whole of American literature" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. Containing the total amount, number, etc.; comprising all the parts; free from deficiency; all; total; entire; as, the whole earth; the whole solar system; the whole army; the whole nation. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Complete; entire; not defective or imperfect; not broken or fractured; unimpaired; uninjured; integral; as, a whole orange; the egg is whole; the vessel is whole. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Possessing, or being in a state of, heath and soundness; healthy; sound; well. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. The entire thing; the entire assemblage of parts; totality; all of a thing, without defect or exception; a thing complete in itself. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. A regular combination of parts; a system. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Sound; healthy. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. Containing all the parts; complete; entire; not defective or broken; hale and sound in body; intact; not fractional: said of a number. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. All the parts of something taken together; a total; the sum of all the parts. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. Wholeness. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. Sound, as in health (so in B.): unimpaired: containing the total amount, number, etc.: all: not defective: complete. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  18. The entire thing: a system or combination of parts. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  19. All; entire; complete: sound. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  20. The entire thing; totality. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  21. Containing all; entire; total; complete. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. The sum total of all the parts or elements of anything; totality. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. Containing the total amount or number or the entire thing; all; total; complete; not defective or imperfect; not impaired, injured, or broken; sound; not hurt or sick; restored to health and soundness. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. The entire thing; the entire or total assemblage of parts; a system; a regular combination of parts; aggregate. Whole-blood, a kinsman derived from the same couple of ancestors, as distinguished from half-blood. Whole-hoofed, having the hoof undivided, as in the horse. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. Entire; unbroken; sound; in good health; containing the total amount; not defective. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  26. The total; the entire thing. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. h[=o]l, adj. sound, as in health (so in B.): unimpaired: containing the total amount, number, &c.: all: not defective: complete: in mining, as yet unworked.--n. the entire thing: a system or combination of parts.--adv. wholly.--adjs. WHOLE'-COL'OURED, all of one colour; WHOLE'-FOOT'ED (coll.) unreserved; WHOLE'-HEART'ED, -SOULED, noble: hearty, generous; WHOLE'-HOOFED, having undivided hoof; WHOLE'-LENGTH, giving the whole figure, as a portrait: full-length.--n. a portrait or statue giving the whole figure.--ns. WHOLE'NESS; WHOLE'S[=A]LE, sale of goods by the whole piece or large quantity.--adj. buying and selling in large quantities: extensive.--n. WHOLE'S[=A]LER, one who sells by wholesale.--adjs. WHOLE'-SKINNED, having an unbroken skin: unhurt: safe in reputation; WHOLE'SOME, healthy: sound: salutary: (Shak.) prosperous.--adv. WHOLE'SOMELY.--ns. WHOLE'SOMENESS; WHOLE'-STITCH, a lace-making stitch used in filling.--adv. WHOLLY (h[=o]'li), completely, altogether.--n. WHOLTH, wholeness, soundness.--WHOLE NUMBER, a unit, or a number composed of units, an integral number.--UPON, ON, THE WHOLE, generally speaking, to sum up.--WITH WHOLE SKIN, safe, unscathed. [A.S. hál, healthy; Ice. heill, Ger. heil. By-form hale (1).] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  28. (Archaic) in good health, well, (they that be w. need not a physician); in sound condition, uninjured, not broken, intact, (hope you will come back w.; get off with a w. skin; there is not a plate left w.; has swallowed a raisin w.); integral, consisting of one or more units, without fractions, (w. numbers, integers); undiminished, without subtraction, (bread made of w. meal, not deprived by bolting of some constituents); (with a in sing.) not less than (spent w. years of misery; went up a w. tone; lasted three w. days; w. regiments were cut down; talked a w. lot of nonsense); (with the, his, &c.) all that there is of (the w. truth, world, duty of man; do thing with one\'s w. heart, heartily, with concentrated effort &c., without doubts &c., whence whole-hearted a., whole-heartedly adv., wholeheartedness n.; the w. priesthood, city, &c., all members or inhabitants of it; COMMITTEE of the w. House; go the w. HOG); w.-coloured, all of one colour; w.-hoofed, with undivided hoofs; w.-length, (portrait) representing person from head to foot; wholesale n. (chiefly attrib.), selling of articles in large quantities to be retailed by others (a w.-s. dealer; sells by w.-s.; w.-s. prices), adj. & adv., on the w.-s. plan, (transf.) on large scale, (our business is w.-s. only; sells w.-s.; a w.-s. slaughter took place; sends out begging letters w.-s.); hence wholeness n. (N.) thing complete in itself; all that there is of something (often of; the golden rule contains the w. of morality; on or upon the w., taking into consideration everything that bears on the question, after weighing pros& cons &c.); organic unity, complete system, total made up of parts, (nature is a w.; the w. & the parts). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  29. n. The entire thing ; the entire assemblage of parts ; totality ;—a regular combination of parts ; a system ;—amount ; aggregate ; gross ; sum. Cabinet Dictionary

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