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Definitions of will

  1. leave or give by will after one's death; "My aunt bequeathed me all her jewelry"; "My grandfather left me his entire estate" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. be going to; indicates futurity Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a legal document declaring a person's wishes regarding the disposal of their property when they die Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. the capability of conscious choice and decision and intention; "the exercise of their volition we construe as revolt"- George Meredith Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a fixed and persistent intent or purpose; "where there's a will there's a way" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. determine by choice; "This action was willed and intended" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. have in mind; "I will take the exam tomorrow" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. decree or ordain; "God wills our existence" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. The power of choosing; the faculty or endowment of the soul by which it is capable of choosing; the faculty or power of the mind by which we decide to do or not to do; the power or faculty of preferring or selecting one of two or more objects. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. The choice which is made; a determination or preference which results from the act or exercise of the power of choice; a volition. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. The choice or determination of one who has authority; a decree; a command; discretionary pleasure. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Strong wish or inclination; desire; purpose. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. That which is strongly wished or desired. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Arbitrary disposal; power to control, dispose, or determine. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. The legal declaration of a person's mind as to the manner in which he would have his property or estate disposed of after his death; the written instrument, legally executed, by which a man makes disposition of his estate, to take effect after his death; testament; devise. See the Note under Testament, 1. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To wish; to desire; to incline to have. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. As an auxiliary, will is used to denote futurity dependent on the verb. Thus, in first person, "I will" denotes willingness, consent, promise; and when "will" is emphasized, it denotes determination or fixed purpose; as, I will go if you wish; I will go at all hazards. In the second and third persons, the idea of distinct volition, wish, or purpose is evanescent, and simple certainty is appropriately expressed; as, "You will go," or "He will go," describes a future event as a fact only. To emphasize will denotes (according to the tone or context) certain futurity or fixed determination. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To be willing; to be inclined or disposed; to be pleased; to wish; to desire. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To form a distinct volition of; to determine by an act of choice; to ordain; to decree. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To enjoin or command, as that which is determined by an act of volition; to direct; to order. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To give or direct the disposal of by testament; to bequeath; to devise; as, to will one's estate to a child; also, to order or direct by testament; as, he willed that his nephew should have his watch. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To exercise an act of volition; to choose; to decide; to determine; to decree. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. A document in which you specify what is to be done with your property when you die and name your executor. You can also use your will to name a guardian for your young children.
  24. Voluntary activity without external compulsion. Medical Dictionary DB
  25. The power of the mind by which one chooses or determines; as, if you exert your will, you can do it; determination; choice; desire; as, he acted against his will; a determination by an authority; hence, a command; as he did his master's will: a legal document disposing of one's property at death. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. Auxiliary having no imperative or infinitive, and followed by the infinitive without to: used, together with shall, to form the simple futre tense: thus, to express simple futurity, singular, first person, I shall; second person, you will; third person, he will; piural, first person, we shall; second person, you will; third person they will: used to express determination in an arrangement exactly the opposite: used in all persons to express willingness: used in a question, in the second and third persons, according to the form expected in the answer; as, shall he? will you? etc.; often used in commands for the sake of courtesy; as, you will take this report to the coionel. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. To wish or desire; to decide upon; to intend firmly; to determine; to choose; command; direct; bequeath or give at death; as, to will one's property to one's heirs; to influence by exerting the power of determing; as, she willed him to turn around; to influence by hypnotic power. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. To choose or decide; decree; to be willing; to wish. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. Would. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. Willed. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. Willing. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  32. Power of choosing or determining: choice or determination: pleasure: command: arbitrary disposal: feeling towards, as in good or ill will: disposition of one's effects at death: the written document containing such. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  33. To exercise the will: to decree: (B.) to be willing. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  34. To determine: to be resolved to do: to command: to dispose of by will. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. Aux., pres. I will, thou wilt, he will; past, would; no past participle. A word denoting either simple futurity or futurity combined with volition according to the subject of the verb. Thus, in the first person, I (we) will, the word denotes willingness, consent, intention, or promise; and when emphasized in indicates determination or fixed purpose; as I will go, if you please; I will go at all hazards; I will have it in spite of him. In the second and third persons will expresses only a simple future or certainty, the idea of volition, purpose, or wish being lost; thus, "you will go," or "he will go," indicates a future event only. The second person may also be used as a polite command; as, you will be sure to do as I have told you. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. As regards will in questions, Mr. R. Grant White lays down the following rules: "Will is never to be used as a question with the first person; as, will I go? A man cannot ask if he wills to do anything that he must know and only he knows. As a question, will in the second person asks the intention of the person addressed; as, will you go to-morrow? that is, Do you mean to go to-morrow? As a question, will in the third person asks what is to be the future action of the person spoken of, with a necessary reference to intension; as, will he go? that is, Is he going? Does he mean to go and is his going sure? Simple futurity with the first person is appropriately expressed by shall. Among inaccurate speakers and writers, especially in Scotland, Ireland, and in some parts of the United States, there is some confusion in the use of shall and will; thus will improperly takes the place of shall in such frequently used phrases as, I will be obliged to you, "we will be at a loss," "I will be much gratified," and so on. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  37. Would stands in the same relation to will that should does to shall. Thus would is seldom or never a preterite indicative pure and simple, being mainly employed in subjunctive, conditional, or optative senses, in the latter case having often the functions and force of an independent verb; as, (a) conditional or subjunctive, "he would do it if he could;" "he could do it if, he would;" "they would have gone had they been permitted." Here it will be seen would refers to the present only, the past being expressed by would have. In such sentences as "He was mistaken it would seem," or "it would appear"-in which should is sometimes used-would retains almost nothing of conditionality, having merely the effect of softening a direct statement. (Mr. R. Grant White regards "it should seem" as the normal expression, though he quotes “it would appearfrom good English writers. He himself writes: “It would seem that a man of Mr. Lowe's general intelligence should know," etc. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  38. Everyday English, chap. xiii.) (b) Optative; "I would that I were young again." In this use the personal pronoun is often omitted. "Would to God we had died in Egypt."-Ex. xvi.3. "Would God I had died for thee, O Absalom."-2. Sam. xviii. 3. "Would thou wert as I am."-Shak. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  39. Would most nearly has the force of a simple past indicative in such sentences as, "he would go and you see what has happened;" but this implies farther that he did actually go or at least set out, and the would is here emphatic. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  40. Would is also used to express a habit or custom, as if it implied a habitual exercise of will; as, she would weep all day; every other day he would fly into a passion. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  41. Will and would were formerly often used with adverbs and prepositional phrases to express motion or change of place, where modern usage would require will go, would go, or the like. "Now I will away;" "I'll to my books;" "he is very sick and would to bed;" "there were wit in this head, and 'twould out."-Shak. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  42. What may be called a similar elliptical usage occurs in such phrases as "what would you?" where present usage would supply have or do. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  43. The power of choosing or determining; choice; determination: disposition of effects at death; testament. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  44. To be resolved; decree.-as an auxiliary verb (p.t. would) it denotes futurity or intention. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  45. To determine; resolve to do: bequeath. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  46. To be desirous; have a wish; mostly in the form would. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. As an auxiliary verb, in the first person a sign of purpose, and in the second and third persons, of futurity. See SHALL. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. To produce by the exercise of will; exercise volition; resolve. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  49. To bequeath by a will. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  50. The power of willing; also, a choice; volition; purpose. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  51. Energy of character; resolution; determination. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  52. A document by which one provides for the disposition of his property after his death. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  53. That faculty of the mind by which we determine either to do or forbear to do; the faculty which is exercised in deciding, among two or more objects, which we shall embrace or pursue, or the power of self-determination and self-conduct; the act of willing; choice; determination; discretion; pleasure; command; direction; disposition; inclination; desire; power; divine determination; moral purpose or counsel; arbitrary disposal; the disposition of a man's estate, to take effect after his death. Good-will, favour; kindness. Ill-will, enmity; unfriendliness. To have one's will, to obtain what is desired. At will, at the will or mere pleasure of another. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  54. To determine; to decide in the mind that something shall be done or forborne; to command; to direct; to wish; to desire; to disposo of estate and effects by testament; an auxiliary verb, and a sign of the future tense, admitting of different significations in the different persons. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  55. The power of determining or choosing; discretion; power; of determining or choosing; discretion; power; pleasure; inclination; intention; that which is wished or desired; a formal declaration in writin of what a person desires to be done with his real or personal estate after death; the written document containing such instruction. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  56. To determine; to direct; to choose; to enjoin; to dispose of by will or testament. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  57. A defective verb used along with another verb to express future time; in the first person, will promises or expresses fixed purpose or determination, as "I will eat"; in the second and third, will simply foretells, as, "thou wilt eat," "he will eat. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  58. Whltehart, paid into the exchequer, imposed by Henry III. upon Thomas de la Linda,for killing a beautiful white hart which that king before had spared in hunting. Camd.Brit 150. thelawdictionary.org
  59. As an auxiliary, will is used to denote futurity dependent on the verb. Thus, in first person, willas, I will go if you wish; I will go at all hazards. In the second and third persons, the idea of distinct volition, wish, or purpose is evanescent, and simple certainty is appropriately expressed; as, will go,will go,. To emphasize will denotes (according to the tone or context) certain futurity or fixed determination. dictgcide_fs
  60. wil, n. power of choosing or determining: volition: choice or determination: pleasure: command: arbitrary disposal: feeling towards, as in good or ill will: disposition of one's effects at death, the written document containing such.--v.i. to have a wish, desire: to resolve, be resolved: to be accustomed, certain, ready, or sure (to do, &c.)--used as an auxiliary, esp. in future constructions: to exercise the will: to decree: (B.) to be willing.--v.t. to wish, desire: to determine: to be resolved to do: to command: to dispose of by will: to subject to another's will, as in hypnotism:--pa.t. would.--adj. WIL'FUL, governed only by one's will: done or suffered by design: obstinate: (Shak.) willing.--adv. WIL'FULLY.--n. WIL'FULNESS.--adj. WILLED, having a will: brought under another's will.--n. WILL'ER, one who wishes, one who wills.--adjs. WILL'ING, having the will inclined to a thing: desirous: disposed: chosen; WILL'ING-HEART'ED, heartily consenting.--adv. WILL'INGLY.--n. WILL'INGNESS.--adj. WILL'YARD (Scot.), wilful: shy.--ns. GOOD'-WILL (see GOOD); ILL'-WILL (see ILL).--AT WILL, at pleasure; CONJOINT, JOINT, WILL, a testamentary act by two persons jointly in the same instrument; HAVE ONE'S WILL, to obtain what one desires; TENANT AT WILL, one who holds lands at the will of the owner; WITH A WILL, with all one's heart; WORK ONE'S WILL, to do exactly what one wants. [A.S. willa, will--willan, wyllan, to wish; Goth. wiljan, Ger. wollen, L. velle.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  61. (pres. I, he, we, you, they, w. or \'ll, thou wilt or It; past& condit. I, he, we, you, they, would pr. wood or \'d, thou wouldst pr. woodst or wouldest or \'dst; neg. forms will not or won\'t, would not or wouldn\'t, or \'d not; no other forms or parts used). 1. (used irrespective of person with more or less of orig. sense of volition): Desire (thing; archaic; what wilt thou?; what would they?); want or desire or choose to (the haven where I would be; come when you w.); wish that, rarely that (usu. in condit. with optative effect; I often omitted; it shall be as you w.; said it should be as we would; would or I would I were a bird!; would it were otherwise!; would God I had died!, i.e. if only God had wished, or perh. ellipt. for I would to God; I would to heaven I was dead; would-be, prefixed as adj. or adv. to wd describing character that person vainly aspires to or that thing is meant to have, as a would be gentleman, smart saying); consent or be prevailed on to (w. or would not go any further; wound would not heal; would you pass the salt?; would not do it for £100); refuse to be prevailed on not to (boys w. be boys; accidents w. happen; you w. have your way; he w., would, get in my light); be accustomed or observed from time to time to (w. sit there for hours; now& then a blackbird would call; w. succeed once in ten times); be likely to turn out to (this w. be Waterloo, I suppose; I don\'t know who it would be). 2. As tense& mood auxiliaries w. & would are used (a) in 2nd& 3rd person (1st having shall, should) to form a plain future or conditional statement or question (you w. hear soon enough; they would have been killed if they had let go; w. or would you, they, be able to hear at such a distance?, but cf. SHALL 5); (b) in 1st person (others having shall, should) to form a future or conditional statement expressing speaker\'s will or intention (I will not be caught again; we would have come if you had given us longer notice); (c) alternatively with shall, should, in sentences of type a changed in reporting to 1st from other person (you say I w., said I would, never manage it, reporting \'You w. never; now more usu. shall, should) or from first to other person (he said he would never manage it, reporting I shall never); (d) in reporting 1st pers. sentences of type b (you promised you would not be caught again). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  62. Facuity by which person decides or conceives himself as deciding upon& initiating action (mind consists of the understanding& the w.; freedom of the w., free-will, power of determining one\'s choice of action independently of causation); (also w.-paper) control exercised by deliberate purpose over impulse, self-control, (has a strong, weak, &c., w.); deliberate or fixed intention (the w. to live in a patient is the surgeon\'s best ally; did it against my w., of my own free w.; where there\'s a w. there\'s a way; my poverty but not my w. consents); energy of intention, power of effecting one\'s intentions or dominating other persons, (do thing with a w., energetically; has a w. that overbears all opposition); contents of the w., what is desired or ordained by person, (thy w. be done; what is your w.?, what do you wish done?; have one\'s w., get thing desired; worked his wicked w. upon them); arbitrary discretion (esp. at w., whenever one pleases; tenant at w., who can be turned out without notice; w.-worship archaic, religion constructed to suit oneself); disposition towards others, wishing of good or ill, (good, ill, w., usu. as compd wds); directions written in legal form for disposition to be made of person\'s property& minor children after his death (often last w. & testament; nuncupative w., see NUNCUPATE; make one\'s w.). Hence -willed, willless, aa. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  63. Have as contents of one\'s w., intend unconditionally, (God wills, willeth, willed, that man should be happy; can we w. what we are told to w.?; he who wills success is half way to it), (abs.) exercise w.-power (has no power to w.; willing& wishing are not the same); instigate or impel or compel by exercise of w.-power (you can w. yourself into contentment; mesmerist wills patient to think himself well; willed the genie into his presence); bequeath by w. (shall will my money to a hospital). Concise Oxford Dictionary

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