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Definitions of wind

  1. a reflex that expels intestinal gas through the anus Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. an indication of potential opportunity; "he got a tip on the stock market"; "a good lead for a job" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. extend in curves and turns; "The road winds around the lake" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. raise or haul up with or as if with mechanical help; "hoist the bicycle onto the roof of the car" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. empty rhetoric or insincere or exaggerated talk; "that's a lot of wind"; "don't give me any of that jazz" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. to move or cause to move in a sinuous, spiral, or circular course; "the river winds through the hills"; "the path meanders through the vineyards"; "sometimes, the gout wanders through the entire body" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. catch the scent of; get wind of; "The dog nosed out the drugs" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. wrap or coil around; "roll your hair around your finger"; "Twine the thread around the spool" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. the act of winding or twisting; "he put the key in the old clock and gave it a good wind" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. breath; "the collision knocked the wind out of him" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a musical instrument in which the sound is produced by an enclosed column of air that is moved by the breath Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. a tendency or force that influences events; "the winds of change" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. coil the spring of (some mechanical device) by turning a stem; "wind your watch" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. form into a wreath Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. air moving (sometimes with considerable force) from an area of high pressure to an area of low pressure; "trees bent under the fierce winds"; "when there is no wind, row". Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. The dotterel. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. The region of the pit of the stomach, where a blow may paralyze the diaphragm and cause temporary loss of breath or other injury; the mark. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To turn completely, or with repeated turns; especially, to turn about something fixed; to cause to form convolutions about anything; to coil; to twine; to twist; to wreathe; as, to wind thread on a spool or into a ball. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To entwist; to infold; to encircle. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To have complete control over; to turn and bend at one's pleasure; to vary or alter or will; to regulate; to govern. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To introduce by insinuation; to insinuate. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To cover or surround with something coiled about; as, to wind a rope with twine. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To turn completely or repeatedly; to become coiled about anything; to assume a convolved or spiral form; as, vines wind round a pole. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To have a circular course or direction; to crook; to bend; to meander; as, to wind in and out among trees. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To go to the one side or the other; to move this way and that; to double on one's course; as, a hare pursued turns and winds. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. The act of winding or turning; a turn; a bend; a twist; a winding. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Air naturally in motion with any degree of velocity; a current of air. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. Air artificially put in motion by any force or action; as, the wind of a cannon ball; the wind of a bellows. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. Breath modulated by the respiratory and vocal organs, or by an instrument. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. Power of respiration; breath. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. Air or gas generated in the stomach or bowels; flatulence; as, to be troubled with wind. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. Air impregnated with an odor or scent. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. A direction from which the wind may blow; a point of the compass; especially, one of the cardinal points, which are often called the four winds. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. A disease of sheep, in which the intestines are distended with air, or rather affected with a violent inflammation. It occurs immediately after shearing. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. Mere breath or talk; empty effort; idle words. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. To expose to the wind; to winnow; to ventilate. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. To perceive or follow by the scent; to scent; to nose; as, the hounds winded the game. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. To drive hard, or force to violent exertion, as a horse, so as to render scant of wind; to put out of breath. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. To rest, as a horse, in order to allow the breath to be recovered; to breathe. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. To blow; to sound by blowing; esp., to sound with prolonged and mutually involved notes. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. Air in motion; a natural current of air; breeze; breath; anything insignificant or light as air; idle words; air filled with a scent; as, the hound got wind of the fox; hence, news; as, to get wind of a plot; gas formed in the digestive organs of the body. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  42. To allow the air to blow upon; to scent, as hounds in a fox hunt; to put out of breath. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  43. To turn round something; twist; to bend in a course; to go a roundabout way. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  44. To coil, twist, or twine; to set in motion by turning a crank or screw; to entwine; to turn, as about something fixed; to direct or introduce by artful means; as, he winds himself into favor; to blow (a horn). The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  45. A bend, coil, or twist. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  46. Wound. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  47. Winding. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  48. Idle talk. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  49. Air in motion: breath: flatulence: anything insignificant. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  50. (wind) To sound by blowing: (wind) to expose to the wind: to drive hard, so as to put out of breath: to allow to recover wind:-pr.p. winding and winding; pa.p. wound and winded. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  51. To turn round, to twist: to coil: to encircle: to change. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  52. To turn completely or often: to turn round something: to twist: to move spirally: to meander:-pr.p. winding; pa.t. and pa.p. wound. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  53. Air in motion; breath; anything insignificant. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  54. To sound by blowing. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  55. To turn around; coil; encircle. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  56. To turn round; move spirally; meander. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  57. A current of air. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  58. To pass around; twine; twist; turn; wreathe; encircle. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  59. To blow, as a horn; sound by blowing. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  60. To detect or follow by scent. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  61. To exhaust the breath of, as by running; put out of breath. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  62. Lung power; breath. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  63. A winding; a bend, turn, or twist. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  64. Air naturally in motion, with any degree of velocity; a current of air; breath; power of respiration; air in motion from any force or action; breath modulated by the organs or by an instrument; air impregnated with scent; anything insignificant or light as wind; flatulence. The four winds, the four cardinal points of the heavens. Down the wind, decaying; declining. To take or have the wind, to gain or have the advantage. To take or get wind, to be divulged; to become public. In the wind's eye, towards the direct point from which the wind blows. Between wind and water, that part of a ship's side or bottom which is frequently brought above water by the rolling of the ship or fluctuation of the water's surface. How the wind blows, the state of things, or the direction they are taking. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  65. To blow; to sound by blowing; to nose; to follow by the scent; to expose to the wind; to drive hard, so as to render scant of wind, as a horse; also to rest a horse, in order to recover wind; to winnow. To wind a ship, is to turn it end for end, so that the wind strikes it on the opposite side. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  66. To turn; to move or cause to turn; to turn round some fixed object; to bind, or to form into a ball or coil by turning; to introduce by insinuation; to change; to vary; to entwist; to infold; to encircle. To wind off, to unwind. To wind out, to extricate. To wind up, to bring to a small compass, as a ball of thread; to bring to a conclusion or settlement; to put in a state of renovated or continued motion. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  67. To turn; to change; to turn around something; to have a circular direction; to crook; to bend; to move round. To wind out, to be extricated; to escape. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  68. In poetry. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  69. Air in perceptible motion; a current of air having a greater or less degree of velocity; one of the cardinal points, as from the four winds; flatulence. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  70. To deprive of wind by over-driving, as a horse; to rest a horse in order that he may recover his breath; to sound by blowing, as a horn, so that the sound may be prolonged and varied. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  71. To turn round some fixed object; to turn or move around something; to have a circular and upward direction; to form into a coil or ball by twisting; to introduce, as one's self by insinuation; to encircle; to twine; to crook; to bend; to have a surface which undulates. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  72. wind (poet. w[=i]nd), n. air in motion: breath: flatulence: anything insignificant: the wind instruments in an orchestra: air impregnated with scent: a hint or suggestion of something secret, publicity: (slang) a part of the body near the stomach: a disease of sheep in which the inflamed intestines are distended by gases.--v.t. (w[=i]nd) to sound or signal by blowing: to scent: (wind) to expose to the wind: to drive hard, so as to put out of breath: to allow to recover wind:--pr.p. w[=i]nd'ing and wind'ing; pa.p. wind'ed and wound.--ns. WIND'AGE, the difference between the size of the bore of a gun and that of the ball or shell: the influence of the wind in deflecting a missile; WIND'BAG, a person of mere words.--adjs. WIND'-BOUND, hindered from sailing by a contrary wind; WIND'-BR[=O]'KEN, affected with convulsive breathing--of a horse; WIND'-CHANG'ING, fickle.--ns. WIND'-CHART, a chart showing the direction of the wind; WIND'-CHEST, the box or reservoir that supplies compressed air to the pipes or reeds of an organ; WIND'-DROP'SY, tympanites; WIND'-EGG, an addle-egg, one soft-shelled or imperfectly formed; W[=I]ND'ER, one who sounds a horn: one who, or that which, winds or rolls; WIND'FALL, fruit blown off a tree by the wind: any unexpected money or other advantage.--adj. WINDFALL'EN, blown down by wind.--ns. WIND'-FLOW'ER, the wood-anemone; WIND'-FUR'NACE, any form of furnace using the natural draught of a chimney without aid of a bellows; WIND'-GALL, a puffy swelling about the fetlock joints of a horse; WIND'-GAUGE, an instrument for gauging or measuring the velocity of the wind: an appliance fixed to a gun by means of which the force of the wind is ascertained so that allowance may be made for it in sighting; WIND'-GUN, air-gun; WIND'-H[=O]'VER, the kestrel.--adv. WIND'ILY.--ns. WIND'INESS; WIND'-IN'STRUMENT, a musical instrument sounded by means of wind or by the breath.--adj. WIND'LESS, without wind.--ns. WIND'MILL, a mill for performing any class of work in which fixed machinery can be employed, and in which the motive-power is the force of the wind acting on a set of sails; WIND'PIPE, the passage for the breath between the mouth and lungs, the trachea.--adj. WIND'-RODE (naut.), riding at anchor with head to the wind.--ns. WIND'ROSE, a graphic representation of the relative frequency of winds from different directions drawn with reference to a centre; WIND'ROW, a row of hay raked together to be made into cocks, a row of peats, &c., set up for drying; WIND'-SAIL (naut.), a wide funnel of canvas used to convey a stream of air below deck.--adj. WIND'-SH[=A]'KEN, agitated by the wind.--ns. WIND'SIDE, the side next the wind; WIND'-SUCK'ER, the kestrel: a critic ready to fasten on any weak spot, however small or unimportant.--adjs. WIND'-SWIFT, swift as the wind; WIND'-TIGHT, air-tight.--adv. WIND'WARD, toward where the wind blows from.--adj. toward the wind.--n. the point from which the wind blows.--adj. WIND'Y.--A CAPFUL OF WIND, a slight breeze; BEFORE THE WIND, carried along by the wind; BETWEEN WIND AND WATER, that part of a ship's side which is now in, now out of, the water owing to the fluctuation of the waves: any vulnerable point; BROKEN WIND, a form of paroxysmal dyspnoea; CAST, or LAY, AN ANCHOR TO WINDWARD, to make prudent provision for the future; DOWN THE WIND, moving with the wind; FIGHT WINDMILLS, to struggle with imaginary opposition, as Don Quixote tilted at the windmill; GET ONE'S WIND, to recover one's breath; GET THE WIND OF, to get on the windward side of; GET TO WINDWARD OF, to secure an advantage over; GET WIND OF, to learn about, to be informed of; HAVE THE WIND OF, to be on the trail of; HOW THE WIND BLOWS, or LIES, the state of the wind: the position of affairs; IN THE WIND, astir, afoot; IN THE WIND'S EYE, IN THE TEETH OF THE WIND, right against the wind; SAIL CLOSE TO THE WIND, to keep the boat's head near enough to wind as to fill but not shake the sails: to be almost indecent; SECOND WIND, new powers of respiration succeeding to the first breathlessness; SOW THE WIND AND REAP THE WHIRLWIND, to act wrongly and receive a crushing retribution. [A.S. wind; Ice. vindr, Ger. wind, L. ventus, Gr. a[=e]t[=e]s, Sans. v[=a]ta, wind.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  73. w[=i]nd, v.t. to turn: to twist: to coil: to haul or hoist, as by a winch: to encircle: to change: (Spens.) to weave.--v.i. to turn completely or often: to turn round something: to twist: to move spirally: to meander: to beat about the bush:--pr.p. w[=i]nd'ing; pa.t. and pa.p. wound.--n. W[=I]ND'ER, one who winds: an instrument for winding: a twisting plant.--adj. W[=I]ND'ING, curving, full of bends: twisted.--n. a turning: a twist.--n. W[=I]ND'ING-EN'GINE, a machine for hoisting.--adv. W[=I]ND'INGLY.--ns. W[=I]ND'ING-MACHINE', a twisting or warping machine; W[=I]ND'ING-SHEET, a sheet enwrapping a corpse: the dripping grease which clings to the side of a candle; W[=I]ND'-UP, the close.--WIND A SHIP, to turn her about end for end; WIND UP, to come to a conclusion: to tighten, to excite very much: to give new life to: to adjust for final settlement: (Shak.) to restore to harmony. [A.S. windan; Ger. winden, Ice. vinda, Goth. windan. Cf. Wend, Wander.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  74. Air in more or less rapid natural motion, breeze or gale or blast, (north &c. w., coming from N. &c.; fair, contrary, w., helping, hindering, ship\'s course; hot, cold, whistling, variable, &c., ww.; constant w., that always blows in same direction at same place; periodical w., recurring at known periods; w. rises, begins to blow or gets stronger; sound, scent, is carried by, comes on, the w.; CAPFUL, SLANT, of w.; ILL w.; before, down, the w., helped by its force; WHISTLE down the w.; BETWEEN w. & water; sail, be, close to or near the w., as nearly against it as is consistent with using its force, fig. venture very near indecency or dishonesty; in the w\'s eye, in the teeth of the w., directly against it; go like the w., swiftly; there is something in the w., there are signs that some step is being secretly prepared; find out how the w. blows or lies, what developments are likely or what is the state of public opinion; take the w. out of one\'s sails, frustrate him by anticipating his arguments, using his material, &c.; sow w. & reap WHIRL w.; raise the w. fig., obtain money needed); windward position or weather-GAUGE (take or get the w. of); (pl.) the four cardinal points (came from the four ww., from all directions); mere empty words, unmeaning rhetoric; artificially produced air-current, air stored for use or used as current, (collect.) part of band consisting of w.-instruments, (organ stops when the w. is exhausted; was knocked down by the w. of the blow; the strings were drowned by the w., the wood w., i.e. flutes &c., by the brass); smell conveyed on w., indication of thing\'s whereabouts or existence, commencing publicity, (get w. of, smell out, begin to suspect, hear rumour of; take or get w., be rumoured); gas generated in bowels &c. by indigestion, flatulence, (break w., release it by anus; baby &c. is troubled with w.); breath as needed in exertion, power of fetching breath without difficulty while running or making similar continuous effort, spot below centre of chest blow on which temporarily paralyses breathing, (have lost, let me recover or get, my w.; has a good, bad, w.; broken w., see BROKEN-winded; second w., recovery of w. in course of exercise after initial breathlessness; have one\'s w. taken, be paralysed by blow in the w.; hit him in the w.). Windbag, wordy orator; w.-bound, unable to sail for contrary ww.; w.-chest, box for compressed air in organ; w.-colie, pain caused by flatulence; w.-cutter, upper lip of mouth of flue-pipe in organ; w.-egg, unfertilized egg incapable of producing chicken; windfall, fruit blown down, fig. unexpected good fortune, esp. legacy; w.-fanner,- windhover; w.-flower poet., the plant anemone; w.-gall, soft tumour on horse\'s fetlock-joint; w.-gauge, anemometer, also instrument showing amount of w. in organ, also apparatus attached to sights enabling allowance to be made for w. in shooting; windhover, kestrel; w.-instrument, musical instrument in which sound is produced by current of air, as organ, flute; windmill, mill worked by action of w. on sails (fight windmills, tilt at imaginary foe or grievance, w. ref. to Don Quixote); windpipe, breathing-tube, trachea; w.-row, line of raked hay, corn-sheaves, peats, &c., made to allow of drying by w.; w.-sail, canvas funnel conveying air to lower parts of ship; w.-spout, waterspout, tornado, or whirlwind; w.-TIGHT; windward a. & n., (region) lying in the direction from which the w. blows, exposed to the w., (look to w.-w.; the w.-w. side; get to w.-w. of, avoid smell of, also get weather GAUGE of or fig. advantage over). Hence windless a. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  75. Sound (horn, bugle, blast, call) by blowing (wi-; winded or by confusion w. foll, wound); detect presence of by scent (wi-; winded; hounds, deer, w. the fox, stalkers; winded his tobacco half a mile off); breathe, make breathe quick& deep by exercise, exhaust w. of, renew w. of by rest, (wi-; winded; give horse a gallop to w. him; am quite winded by the climb; rested to w. the horses). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  76. (wound pr. wow-); & n. Go in circular, spiral, curved, or crooked course, meander, (path, river, winds; herd winds o\'er the lea; creeper winds round pole; winding staircase, spiral); make one\'s or its way &c. circuitously, insinuate oneself into, (brook winds its way; wound himself or his way into my affections); coil (t. & i.), wrap closely (t. & i.), surround with coil, embrace, (w. cotton on reel, wool into ball, &c.; also with off adv. or-prep. =unwind; w. person round one\'s fingers, exercise complete domination over; wound the blanket round him, her arms round the child, the child in her arms; winding sheet, in which corpse is wound; w. pegtop, coil string round it; serpent winds itself or winds round victim); hoist or draw by use of windlass &c. (w. ship out of harbour, ore up from mine); =w. up (clock &c.); w. ship, reverse positions of bow& stern; w. up, coil the whole of (w., up piece of string), tighten coiling or coiled spring or fig. tension or intensity or efficiency of (w. up strings of fiddle; w. up clock &c.; is winding himself up for an effort or to do it; the administration needs winding up, is slack; person is wound up to fury; expectation was wound up to a high pitch), bring to a conclusion, conclude t. & i., (wound up his speech, or wound up, by declaring; shot his wife& child& wound up by stabbing himself; w. up company, arrange its affairs& dissolve it; company winds up, ceases business, goes into liquidation, whence winding-up n.); hence winder (1, 2) n., windingly adv. (N.) bend or turn in course; single turn in winding clock, string, &c.; w.-up, conclusion, finish. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  77. fling, cast, &c. to the ww., cease to heed or be influenced by (prudence, decency, &c.); w.-jammer (Slang), merchant sailing vessel. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  78. Moving air, a current of air. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  79. See flatus. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  80. A word common to many Aryan languages, denoting air in motion. Each wind had at first its special name. Thus Boreas was the north, Auster and Notos the south, Eurus the east, Zephyr the west wind. They had also names according to the strength with which they blew : the lighter puffing breezes being called in Skt. Pavana, in Gr. Pan, in L. Favonius (perhaps Faunus) ; the stronger winds were represented by Hermes and Orpheus. See Aeolian ; Euroclydon. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  81. n. [Anglo-Saxon] Air naturally in motion with any degree of velocity ; a current of air ; a breeze :—air artificially put in motion ;—breath modulated by the respiratory and vocal organs or by an instrument ;—power of respiration ; breath ;--gas generated in the stomach and bowels ; flatulence ;—air impregnated with an odour or scent; —a direction in which the wind may blow ; a point of the compass; especially one of the cardinal points ; anything insignificant or light as wind ; mere breath or talk. Cabinet Dictionary

What are the misspellings for wind?

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