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Definitions of wit

  1. To know; used only in the infinitive, to wit, that is, to say. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To be or become aware of; learn. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. (B.) To know. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. Mind; intellect; understanding; sense. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. Felicitous association of objects not usually connected, so as to produce a pleasant surprise; also. the power of readily combining objects in such a manner. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. A person of eminent sense or knowledge; a man of genius, fancy, or humor; one distinguished for bright or amusing sayings, for repartee, and the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. A mental faculty, or power of the mind; - used in this sense chiefly in the plural, and in certain phrases; as, to lose one's wits; at one's wits' end, and the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To be informed; to be known; used now only in the phrase to wit, signifying "namely," "that is to say"; also in a few compounds, as outwit. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  9. mental ability; "he's got plenty of brains but no common sense" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughter Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a witty amusing person who makes jokes Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. To know; to learn. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. ing (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Mind; sense; knowledge; mental faculty or power; the power of combining ideas or words so as to produce a laughable effect; mental quickness; one who possesses power to make others laugh. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. Understanding (so in B.): a mental faculty (chiefly in pl.): the power of combining ideas with a ludicrous effect: the result of this power: one who has wit. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  16. Intelligence; faculty of combining ideas so as to produce a striking or amusing effect; the exercise of this faculty; one who has wit. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  17. Sudden and ingenious association of ideas or words, causing surprize and merriment. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. A witty person; formerly, a person of learning or genius. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  19. The reasoning power or faculty; sense. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  20. Originally, intellect; the understanding or mental powers; the association of ideas in a manner natural, but unusual and striking, so as to produce surprise joined with pleasure; the faculty of, or a turn for, associating ideas in this manner; a man of genius; sense; judgment; a man given to witty remark; power of invention; faculty of the mind; soundness of mind or judgment. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  21. The power or faculty of knowing; understanding; intellect; the power of associating ideas in a manner new and unexpected, and so connected as to produce pleasant surprise; a man who excels in giving expression to unusual and striking ideas in such a manner as to create amusement or pleasant surprise; sound mind; ingenuity. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

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Usage examples for wit

  1. While his strength made him popular with the hard working men, his good nature, wit stories, and ability to make a good speech made him popular with everybody! – Boys' and Girls' Biography of Abraham Lincoln by James H. Shaw
  2. Wit is something, but not everything. – Parisian Points of View by Ludovic Halévy Commentator: Brander Matthews
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