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Definitions of worm

  1. has a nasty or unethical character undeserving of respect Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. to move in a twisting or contorted motion, (esp. when struggling); "The prisoner writhed in discomfort."; "The child tried to wriggle free from his aunt's embrace." Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. move with slow, sinuous movements Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. any of numerous relatively small elongated soft-bodied animals especially of the phyla Annelida and Chaetognatha and Nematoda and Nemertea and Platyhelminthes; also many insect larvae Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. screw thread on a gear with the teeth of a worm wheel or rack Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a software program capable of reproducing itself that can spread from one computer to the next over a network; "worms take advantage of automatic file sending and receiving features found on many computers" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7. a person who has a nasty or unethical character undeserving of respect Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. to move in a twisting or contorted motion, (especially when struggling); "The prisoner writhed in discomfort"; "The child tried to wriggle free from his aunt's embrace" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. The thread of a screw. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A despicable person. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  11. A creeping or a crawling animal of any kind or size, as a serpent, caterpillar, snail, or the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Any small creeping animal or reptile, either entirely without feet, or with very short ones, including a great variety of animals; as, an earthworm; the blindworm. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Any helminth; an entozoon. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Any annelid. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. An insect larva. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Same as Vermes. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. An internal tormentor; something that gnaws or afflicts one's mind with remorse. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A being debased and despised. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Anything spiral, vermiculated, or resembling a worm Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A spiral instrument or screw, often like a double corkscrew, used for drawing balls from firearms. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A certain muscular band in the tongue of some animals, as the dog; the lytta. See Lytta. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. The condensing tube of a still, often curved and wound to economize space. See Illust. of Still. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. A short revolving screw, the threads of which drive, or are driven by, a worm wheel by gearing into its teeth or cogs. See Illust. of Worm gearing, below. Newage Dictionary DB
  24. To work slowly, gradually, and secretly. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. To clean by means of a worm; to draw a wad or cartridge from, as a firearm. See Worm, n. 5 (b). Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To cut the worm, or lytta, from under the tongue of, as a dog, for the purpose of checking a disposition to gnaw. The operation was formerly supposed to guard against canine madness. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To wind rope, yarn, or other material, spirally round, between the strands of, as a cable; to wind with spun yarn, as a small rope. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. A short revolving screw, the threads of which drive, or are driven by, a worm wheel by gearing into its teeth or cogs. See Illust. of gearing, below. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To effect, remove, drive, draw, or the like, by slow and secret means; - often followed by out. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. Any small, creeping or crawling animal, usually having a soft, naked body; a spiral or wormlike thing, as a screw thread, etc.; any creature that is humble and abased. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. To work slowly, secretly, and gradually. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  32. To accomplish by crooked, slow, and secret means. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. Any small creeping animal: anything that gnaws or torments: remorse: a debased being: anything spiral: the thread of a screw: a spiral pipe used in distilling. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  34. To work slowly or secretly. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. To effect by slow and secret means. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. Small creeping boneless animal: grub: reptile: spiral pipe: thread of a screw. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  37. To gain by slow and secret means. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  38. To work slowly and secretly. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  39. To insinuate (oneself or itself) into, as a worm; effect as by crawling; with in or into. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. To draw forth by artful means, as a secret; followed by out. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. To work or proceed stealthily and slowly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. A small legless, invertebrate crawling animal. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. A short screw formed to mesh with a gear-wheel; the thread of a screw; the spiral condensing pipe of a still. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. Anat. An organ or part that resembles a worm in shape. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. Caused by worms. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  46. A disease in infancy; a division of invertebral animals; the entozoa, specially. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  47. Any small creeping animal or reptile, either entirely without feet or with very short ones, including a great variety of animals of different classes and orders, as the blind-worm, larvae of insects, intestinal worms, &c.; anything which, working secretly, gnaws and destroys like a worm; remorse; that which incessantly gnaws the conscience; that which torments; a being debased and despised; one who devours what he reads like a worm; a spiral, worm-like instrument, used for drawing wads and cartridges from cannon and small arms; something spiral, vermiculated, or resembling a worm, as the threads of a screw; a spiral, metallic pipe placed in a tub of water, through which the vapour passes in distillation, and in which it is cooled and condensed; a small, worm-like part, situated beneath a dog's tongue. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  48. To expel or undermine by slow and secret means; to cut something, called a worm, from under the tongue of a dog; to draw the wad or cartridge from a gun; to clean by the worm; to wind a rope spirally round a cable, between the strands; or to wind a smaller rope with spun-yarn. To worm one's self into, to enter gradually by arts and insinuations. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  49. Any long, small, creeping animal entirely without feet, or with very short ones; the well-known, long, string-like creature that lives in the earth; a grub; a maggot; figuratively, anything that gnaws or torments internally or one's conscience; a thing debased and despised; anything spiral or thread-like, as the thread of a screw; in a still, the coil of pipe lodged among cold water through which the vapour or spirit runs and is condensed; a small worm-like ligament under the tongue of a dog. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  50. To work gradually and secretly; to undermine or expel by slow and secret means. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  51. A general name of no scientific value, used to designate any of the Flatworms, Roundworms, Polychaetes or Oligochaetes. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  52. [Anglo-Saxon] A general name of no scientific value, used to designate any of the Flatworms, Roundworms, Polychaetes or Oligochaetes (zool.). na
  53. Computer virus replicating very fast and causing disruption of networked machines. thelawdictionary.org
  54. To effect, remove, drive, draw, or the like, by slow and secret means; -- often followed by out. mso.anu.edu.au
  55. the representative in the Authorized Version of several Hebrew words. Sas , which occurs in ( Isaiah 51:18 ) probably denotes some particular species of moth, whose larva is injurious to wool. Rimmah , ( Exodus 16:20 ) points evidently to various kinds of maggots and the larvae of insects which feed on putrefying animal matter, rather than to earthworms. Toleah is applied in ( 28:39 ) to some kinds of larvae destructive to the vines. In ( Job 19:26 ; 21:26 ; 24:20 ) there is an allusion to worms (insect larvae) feeding on the dead bodies of the buried. There is the same allusion in ( Isaiah 66:24 ) which words are applied by our Lord, ( Mark 9:44 Mark 9:46 Mark 9:48 ) metaphorically to the torments of the guilty in the world of departed spirits. The valley of Hinnom near Jerusalem, where the filth of the city was cast, was alive with worms. The death of Herod Agrippa I, was caused by worms. ( Acts 12:23 ) biblestudytools.com
  56. Heb. sas ( Isaiah 51:8 ), denotes the caterpillar of the clothes-moth. biblestudytools.com
  57. The manna bred worms (tola'im), but on the Sabbath there was not any worm (rimmah) therein ( Exodus 16:20 Exodus 16:24 ). Here these words refer to caterpillars or larvae, which feed on corrupting matter. These two Hebrew words appear to be interchangeable ( Job 25:6 ; Isaiah 14:11 ). Tola'im in some places denotes the caterpillar ( Deuteronomy 28:39 ; Jonah 4:7 ), and rimmah, the larvae, as bred from putridity ( Job 17:14 ; 21:26 ; 24:20 ). In Micah 7:17 , where it is said, "They shall move out of their holes like worms," perhaps serpents or "creeping things," or as in the Revised Version, "crawling things," are meant. The word is used figuratively in Job 25:6 ; Psalms 22:6 ; Isaiah 41:14 ; Mark 9:44 Mark 9:46 Mark 9:48 ; Isaiah 66:24 . These dictionary topics are fromM.G. Easton M.A., D.D., Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Third Edition,published by Thomas Nelson, 1897. Public Domain, copy freely.[N] indicates this entry was also found in Nave's Topical Bible[S] indicates this entry was also found in Smith's Bible DictionaryBibliography InformationEaston, Matthew George. "Entry for Worm". "Easton's Bible Dictionary". . biblestudytools.com
  58. To effect, remove, drive, draw, or the like, by slow and secret means; often followed by out. dictgcide_fs
  59. wurm, n. a term destitute of scientific precision, but often applied to any one of the members of numerous classes of invertebrate animals which are more or less earthworm-like in appearance, the earthworm, a grub, a maggot: anything spiral: the thread of a screw: the lytta or vermiform cartilage of a dog's tongue: the instrument used to withdraw the charge of a gun: a spiral pipe surrounded by cold water into which steam or vapours pass for condensation in distilling: anything that corrupts, gnaws, or torments: remorse: a debased being, a groveller: (pl.) any intestinal disease arising from the presence of parasitic worms.--v.i. to move like a worm, to squirm: to work slowly or secretly.--v.t. to effect by slow and secret means: to elicit by underhand means: to remove the lytta or vermiform cartilage of a dog's tongue.--n. WORM'-CAST, the earth voided by the earthworm.--adjs. WORM'-EAT'EN, eaten by worms: old: worn-out; WORM'-EAT'ING, living habitually on worms; WORMED, bored by worms: injured by worms.--ns. WORM'-FENCE, a zigzag fence formed of stakes; WORM'-F[=E]'VER, a feverish condition in children ascribed to intestinal worms; WORM'-GEAR, a gear-wheel having teeth shaped so as to mesh with a worm or shaft on which a spiral is turned, an endless screw; WORM'-GEAR'ING; WORM'-GRASS, pink-root: a kind of stonecrop; WORM'-HOLE, the hole made by a worm.--adj. WORM'-HOLED, perforated by worm-holes.--ns. WORM'-POW'DER, a vermifuge; WORM'-SEED, santonica: the treacle mustard; WORM'-WHEEL, a wheel gearing with an endless screw or worm, receiving or imparting motion.--adj. WOR'MY, like a worm: grovelling: containing a worm: abounding with worms: gloomy, dismal, like the grave. [A.S. wyrm, dragon, snake, creeping animal; cog. with Goth. waurms, a serpent, Ice. ormr, Ger. wurm; also with L. vermis.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  60. [Latin] An indefinite term for a great variety of creeping animals; specifically, a long cylindrical, ribbon-like, or thread-like animal parasite (helminth). Guinea-w., Medina-w., the Filaria medinensis. Pin-w., Seat-w., see Oxyuris. Tape-w., see Tapeworm. Thread-w., see Oxyuris and Trichocephalus. Whip-w., see Trichocephalus. W. abscess, an abscess containing or produced by w’s. W. fever, a fever of young children attributed to worms; in many cases a mild typhoid fever. na
  61. [Latin] The median lobe of the cerebellum. See Vermis. na
  62. Kinds of invertebrate limbless or apparently limbless creeping animal, esp. such as are segmented in rings or are parasitic in the intestines or tissues (also in compd names of larvae, insects, lizards, &c., with some resemblance to ww., as silk, glow, slow, -w.; dog, child, has ww., internal parasites; food for ww., of person when dead; a w. will turn, the meekest will resist or retaliate if pushed too far; the w. of conscience, gnawing pain of remorse; so where their w. dieth not; am a w. to-day, out of sorts& spiritless, w. ref. to Ps. xxii. 6); insignificant or contemptible person; spiral part of screw, spiral cartridge-extractor, spiral pipe of still in which vapour is cooled& condensed; ligament under dogs tongue; w.-cast, tubular mass of earth voided by earth-w.; w.-eaten, gnawn by ww., full of w.-holes, (fig.) antiquated; w.-fishing, with w. for bait; w.-gear, arrangement of toothed wheel worked by revolving spiral; w.-hole, left in wood, fruit, &c., by passage of w.; w.-holed, w.-eaten (lit.); w.-seed, (Levantine plant bearing) seed used to expel intestinal ww.; w.-wheel, wheel of w.-gear. Hence wormy a., worminess n. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  63. Insinuate oneself into (favour, persons confidence, &c.); convey oneself, progress, make one\'s way, with crawling motion (wormed himself or his way or wormed through the bushes); draw (secret &c.) by crafty persistence out (of person); cut w. of (dog); rid (garden-bed &c.) of ww. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  64. See Helminth. American pocket medical dictionary.
  65. A small, limbless, creeping animal such as a member of the phyla Platyhelminthes, Nemathelminthes, or Annulata. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  66. The median portion of the cerebellum, as distinguished from its hemispheres. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  67. (from its shape). A spiral metallic pipe placed in a tub of water, to condense the vapour which passes through it from the still. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  68. n. [Anglo-Saxon] Originally, any creeping or crawling animal; a serpent caterpillar, snail, or the like;-a being debased or despised;-pl. Animals which live and breed in the intestines of other animals;-figuratively, something that gnaws or afflicts one's conscience;-any thing spiral, vermiculated, or resembling a worm;-the thread of a screw;- a spiral instrument for drawing cartridges from fire arms;- a small worm-like ligament under a dog's tongue;-a spiral metallic pipe through which vapour passes in distillation;-a short revolving screw the threads of which drive a wheel by gearing into its teeth. Cabinet Dictionary

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