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Definitions of worth

  1. To befall; to betide, as woe worth the day. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To be; to become; to betide; - now used only in the phrases, woe worth the day, woe worth the man, etc., in which the verb is in the imperative, and the nouns day, man, etc., are in the dative. Woe be to the day, woe be to the man, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. Be. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. French couturier (born in England) regarded as the founder of Parisian haute couture; noted for introducing the bustle (1825-1895) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. an indefinite quantity of something having a specified value; "10 dollars worth of gasoline" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. having a specified value; "not worth his salt"; "worth her weight in gold" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7. The principal which, drawing interest at a given rate, will amount to the given sum at the date on which this is to be paid; thus, interest being at 6%, the present value of $106 due one year hence is $100. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To be; to become; to betide; -- now used only in the phrases, woe worth the day, woe worth the man, etc., in which the verb is in the imperative, and the nouns day, man, etc., are in the dative. Woe be to the day, woe be to the man, etc., are equivalent phrases. Newage Dictionary DB
  9. That which makes a thing useful or valuable; hence, value or price; moral value; excellence or virtue; as, a man of sterling worth. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. Value: that quality which renders a thing valuable: price: moral excellence: importance. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. Value; price; moral excellence; importance. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  12. That quality which renders a thing useful or desirable; value; excellence. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. High personal character; merit; virtue. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. That quality of a thing which renders a thing of value; value; price; value of mental or moral qualities; virtue; desert; merit; importance; valuable qualities; excellence. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  15. A termination in names signifying a farm or court, as in Wordsworth. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. That quality of a thing which gives to it a value; price; rate; excellence; merit; usefulness; comparative importance. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  17. having sufficient worth; "an idea worth considering"; "a cause deserving or meriting support"; "the deserving poor" (often used ironically) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. having a specified value; "a house valued at a million dollars"; "not worth his salt"; "worth her weight in gold" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. Equal in value to; furnishing an equivalent for; proper to be exchanged for. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Having possessions equal to; having wealth or estate to the value of. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. That quality of a thing which renders it valuable or useful; sum of valuable qualities which render anything useful and sought; value; hence, often, value as expressed in a standard, as money; equivalent in exchange; price. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Value in respect of moral or personal qualities; excellence; virtue; eminence; desert; merit; usefulness; as, a man or magistrate of great worth. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Valuable; of worthy; estimable; also, worth while. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Deserving of; - in a good or bad sense, but chiefly in a good sense. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. Equal in value to; having estate or wealth to the value of ; deserving of; meriting. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. Equal in value to: deserving of. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. Deserving (of). The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. Equal in value to; deserving of; equal in possessions to; having estate to the value of. Worthiest of blood, denoting the preference of sons to daughters in the descent of estates. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. Equal in value to; deserving of; having an estate or means to the value of. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for worth?

Usage examples for worth

  1. It can't be helped; the news I bring will be worth a horse or two anyhow. – On the Heels of De Wet by The Intelligence Officer
  2. What do you think our pearls are worth – The Second String by Nat Gould
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