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Definitions of worth

  1. French couturier (born in England) regarded as the founder of Parisian haute couture; noted for introducing the bustle (1825-1895) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. having sufficient worth; "an idea worth considering"; "a cause deserving or meriting support"; "the deserving poor" (often used ironically) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. having a specified value; "a house valued at a million dollars"; "not worth his salt"; "worth her weight in gold" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. an indefinite quantity of something having a specified value; "10 dollars worth of gasoline" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the quality that renders something desirable or valuable or useful Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. having a specified value; "not worth his salt"; "worth her weight in gold" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7. Equal in value to; furnishing an equivalent for; proper to be exchanged for. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Having possessions equal to; having wealth or estate to the value of. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. That quality of a thing which renders it valuable or useful; sum of valuable qualities which render anything useful and sought; value; hence, often, value as expressed in a standard, as money; equivalent in exchange; price. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Value in respect of moral or personal qualities; excellence; virtue; eminence; desert; merit; usefulness; as, a man or magistrate of great worth. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. The principal which, drawing interest at a given rate, will amount to the given sum at the date on which this is to be paid; thus, interest being at 6%, the present value of $106 due one year hence is $100. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To be; to become; to betide; -- now used only in the phrases, woe worth the day, woe worth the man, etc., in which the verb is in the imperative, and the nouns day, man, etc., are in the dative. Woe be to the day, woe be to the man, etc., are equivalent phrases. Newage Dictionary DB
  13. Valuable; of worthy; estimable; also, worth while. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To be; to become; to betide; - now used only in the phrases, woe worth the day, woe worth the man, etc., in which the verb is in the imperative, and the nouns day, man, etc., are in the dative. Woe be to the day, woe be to the man, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Deserving of; - in a good or bad sense, but chiefly in a good sense. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. That which makes a thing useful or valuable; hence, value or price; moral value; excellence or virtue; as, a man of sterling worth. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. Equal in value to; having estate or wealth to the value of ; deserving of; meriting. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. Value: that quality which renders a thing valuable: price: moral excellence: importance. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  19. Equal in value to: deserving of. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. Be. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. In the phrase WOE WORTH, sig. woe be to. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. Value; price; moral excellence; importance. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. Having value; equal in value (to); exchangeable (for). The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. Deserving (of). The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. That quality which renders a thing useful or desirable; value; excellence. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. High personal character; merit; virtue. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. Equal in value to; deserving of; equal in possessions to; having estate to the value of. Worthiest of blood, denoting the preference of sons to daughters in the descent of estates. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  28. That quality of a thing which renders a thing of value; value; price; value of mental or moral qualities; virtue; desert; merit; importance; valuable qualities; excellence. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. A termination in names signifying a farm or court, as in Wordsworth. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To befall; to betide, as woe worth the day. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. That quality of a thing which gives to it a value; price; rate; excellence; merit; usefulness; comparative importance. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. Equal in value to; deserving of; having an estate or means to the value of. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. See WORT thelawdictionary.org
  34. Measure of the value received, derived satisfaction of a tangible or intangible product. thelawdictionary.org
  35. Deserving of; -- in a good or bad sense, but chiefly in a good sense. mso.anu.edu.au
  36. To be; to become; to betide; now used only in the phrases, woe worth the day, woe worth the man, etc., in which the verb is in the imperative, and the nouns day, man, etc., are in the dative. Woe be to the day, woe be to the man, etc., are equivalent phrases. dictgcide_fs
  37. Deserving of; in a good or bad sense, but chiefly in a good sense. dictgcide_fs
  38. wurth, n. value: possessions: that quality which renders a thing valuable: price: moral excellence: importance.--adj. equal in value to: having a certain moral value: deserving of.--adj. WORTH'FUL.--adv. WORTH'ILY (th), in a worthy manner: justly: truly.--n. WORTH'INESS (th).--adj. WORTH'LESS, of no worth or value: having no value, virtue, excellence, &c.: useless.--adv. WORTH'LESSLY.--n. WORTH'LESSNESS.--adj. WORTHY (wur'thi), having worth: valuable: deserving: suited to: (B.) deserving (either of good or bad).--n. a man of eminent worth: a local celebrity: (Shak.) anything of value:--pl. WOR'THIES.--v.t. to make worthy.--WORTHIEST OF BLOOD, male, as opposed to female--of inheritance.--NINE WORTHIES, Hector, Alexander the Great, Julius Cæsar; Joshua, David, Judas Maccabæus; Arthur, Charlemagne, Godfrey of Bouillon. [A.S. weorth, wurth (Ger. wert), value.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  39. wurth, v.i. to be, happen, as in the phrase WOE WORTH=woe be to (with the noun in the dative). [A.S. weorthan, to become; cf. Ger. werden.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  40. pred. a. (governing noun like trans. part.) & n. Of value equivalent to (is w. much, little, nothing, about 2/6; is little w. poet., w. little; BIRD in hand is w. two in bush; what is the house w.?; the rarer it is the more it is w.); deserving, worthy of, bringing compensation for, (w. one\'s salt, earning one\'s keep by good service; w. doing, hearing, notice, the trouble, WHILE, an effort, troubling oneself about, &c.; w. it colloq., w. while; to reign is w. ambition; game not w. CANDLE); possessed of, having property amounting to, (is, died, w. a million; spent all he was w. on it; for all one is w. slang, with one\'s utmost efforts, without reserve). (N.) what a person or thing is w., value, merit, high merit or excellence, (of great, little, no, w.; persons of w.; true w. often goes unrecognized), whence worthless a., worthlessly adv., worthlessness n.; coins equivalent of commodity (give me a shillings, half-a-crown\'s, w. of stamps; also in comb. as penny-w., two-pennyw. or -pennorth, three-haporth &c.). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  41. 3rd sing. subjunct. (archaic). Befall (only in woe w. the day= cursed be). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  42. I give you, you must take, this (story, statement, suggestion) for what it is w., I do not guarantee its accuracy, wisdom, &c. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  43. n. [Anglo-Saxon] That quality of a thing which renders it valuable or useful; value; hence, often, value as expressed in a standard, as money;-value of moral or personal qualities; virtue; eminence; usefulness;-importance; consequence. Cabinet Dictionary

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