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Definitions of wound

  1. hurt the feelings of; "She hurt me when she did not include me among her guests"; "This remark really bruised me ego" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a casualty to military personnel resulting from combat Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. cause injuries or bodily harm to Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. any break in the skin or an organ caused by violence or surgical incision Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the act of inflicting a wound Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a figurative injury (to your feelings or pride); "he feared that mentioning it might reopen the wound"; "deep in her breast lives the silent wound"; "The right reader of a good poem can tell the moment it strikes him that he has taken an immortal wound--that he will never get over it"--Robert Frost Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7. put in a coil Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a series winding, or one in which the armature coil, the field-magnet coil, and the external circuit form a continuous conductor; a shunt winding, or one of such a character that the armature current is divided, a portion of the current being led around the field-magnet coils. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. imp. & p. p. of Wind to twist, and Wind to sound by blowing. Newage Dictionary DB
  10. A hurt or injury caused by violence; specifically, a breach of the skin and flesh of an animal, or in the substance of any creature or living thing; a cut, stab, rent, or the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. Fig.: An injury, hurt, damage, detriment, or the like, to feeling, faculty, reputation, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. An injury to the person by which the skin is divided, or its continuity broken; a lesion of the body, involving some solution of continuity. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To hurt by violence; to produce a breach, or separation of parts, in, as by a cut, stab, blow, or the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To hurt the feelings of; to pain by disrespect, ingratitude, or the like; to cause injury to. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. imp. & p. p. of Wind to twist, and Wind to sound by blowing. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity. Medical Dictionary DB
  17. A cut; an injury by which the skin is divided; a stab; a hurt; hence, injury or harm to feelings, reputation, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. To make a cut or hurt in; to hurt by violence; injure; hurt the feelings of: (wound). The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. Of the verb wind. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. An injury or traumatism, usually with a solution of continuity. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  21. An injuring in which tissues are separated. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  22. Pa.t. and pa.p. of WIND, to turn. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. A cut or bruise: hurt: injury. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. To make a wound: to injure. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  25. A cut; injury; hurt. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  26. Of to wind. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  27. To give a wound to; injure; hurt the feelings of. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  28. To inflict a wound upon; hurt; pain. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. Imp. & pp. of WIND, v. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. A hurt or injury caused by violence, as a stab, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. Of Wind. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  32. A breach of the skin and flesh, or a division of the soft parts of an animal, caused by violence or external force; a breach of the bark and substance of a tree or other plant, caused by violence or external force; injury; hurt. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  33. To hurt by violence; to inflict a wound on; to pain. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  34. To inflict a wound. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  35. Twined in a circular direction upwards; twined in a circuitous manner. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  36. A ent or suchlike injury to the skin or flesh of an animal; any hurt or injury given by violence. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  37. To cut or rend the skin or flesh of an animal; to hurt or injure by violence. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  38. Pt. of the verb wind. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  39. In criminal cases, the definition of a "wound" is an injury to the person hywhich the skin is broken. State v. Leonard, 22 Mo. 451; Moriarty v. Brooks, 6 Car. & P.084."In legal medicine, the term 'wound' is used in a much more comprehensive sensethan in surgery. In the latter, it means strictly a solution of continuity ; in the former,injuries of every description that affect either the hard or the soft parts; and accordinglyunder It are comprehended bruises, contusions, fractures, luxations," etc. 2 Beck, Med.Jur. 100. thelawdictionary.org
  40. wownd, pa.t. and pa.p. of wind. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  41. w[=oo]nd, n. any division of soft parts, including the skin, produced by external mechanical force--whether incised, punctured, contused, lacerated, or poisoned: any cut, bruise, hurt, or injury.--v.t. to make a wound in: to injure.--adj. WOUN'DABLE, capable of being wounded.--n. WOUN'DER.--adv. WOUN'DILY (coll.), excessively.--n. WOUN'DING.--adj. WOUND'LESS, exempt from being wounded, invulnerable: harmless.--n. WOUND'WORT, a name applied to several plants of popular repute as vulneraries, as the kidney-vetch, &c.: a plant of genus Stachys, the marsh or clown's woundwort.--adj. WOUN'DY, causing wounds: (coll.) excessive. [A.S. wund (Ger. wunde, Ice. und)--A.S. wund, wounded; prob. orig. pa.p. of A.S. winnan, to fight, strive.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  42. Injury done by cut or stab or blow or tear to animal or vegetable tissues including& usu. going beyond the cutting or picrcing or breaking or tearing of the skin or bark or other integument, (fig.) injury done to persons reputation &c. or pain inflicted on his feelings, (poet.) pangs of love, (receive, inflict, make, heal, a w.; incised, punctured, contused, lacerated, w.; open, incurable, festering, mortal, w.); w.-work, kinds of plant supposed to have healing properties; hence woundless a. (Vb) inflict w. on (often fig., esp. wounded vanity, feelings; willing to w., spiteful). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  43. Any solution of the continuity of an external or internal surface caused by violence; a traumatism. American pocket medical dictionary.
  44. A division of the soft parts of the body by a mechanical force applied externally. In legal medicine, any lesion of the body resulting from external violence, whether accompanied or not with rupture of the skin or mucous membrane. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  45. n. [Anglo-Saxon] A cut, stab, bruise, rent or the like;-hence, injury; hurt; damage; detriment. Cabinet Dictionary

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