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Definitions of wrench

  1. Trick; deceit; fraud; stratagem. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. A violent twist, or a pull with twisting. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. A sprain; an injury by twisting, as in a joint. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. Means; contrivance. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. The system made up of a force and a couple of forces in a plane perpendicular to that force. Any number of forces acting at any points upon a rigid body may be compounded so as to be equivalent to a wrench. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To wring or pull with a twist; to strain or sprain; as, to wrench one's ankle. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7. To wring or pull with a twist: to force by violence: to sprain. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  8. To pull with a twist; twist violently; sprain. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  9. To twist violently; wrest; sprain; distort. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  10. twist suddenly so as to sprain; "wrench one's ankle"; "The wrestler twisted his shoulder"; "the hikers sprained their ankles when they fell"; "I turned my ankle and couldn't walk for several days" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. make a sudden twisting motion Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. twist and compress, as if in pain or anguish; "Wring one's hand" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. To pull with a twist; to wrest, twist, or force by violence; to strain; to distort. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  14. To force by twisting; to sprain; to distort. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  15. a jerky pulling movement Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. twist or pull violently or suddenly, especially so as to remove (something) from that to which it is attached or from where it originates; "wrench a window off its hinges"; "wrench oneself free from somebody's grip". Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. An instrument, often a simple bar or lever with jaws or an angular orifice either at the end or between the ends, for exerting a twisting strain, as in turning bolts, nuts, screw taps, etc.; a screw key. Many wrenches have adjustable jaws for grasping nuts, etc., of different sizes. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To pull with a twist; to wrest, twist, or force by violence. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To strain; to sprain; hence, to distort; to pervert. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A violent twist; a sprain; a tool for turning nuts on bolts, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. A violent twist: a sprain: an instrument for turning bolts, etc. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. A violent twist or pull; sprain: instrument for turning nuts of bolts, &c. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. The act of wrenching. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. A violent twist, or a pull with twisting; a sprain; an injury by twisting, as in a joint; an instrument for screwing or unscrewing iron-work. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. A sudden or violent twist; a sprain; a tool for forcibly turning iron screws. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for wrench?

Usage examples for wrench

  1. Gaylord's impatience was not less than his own; these two, who had grown so close, had now become painful and impossible to each other, and longed for the wrench of farewell. – Youth and the Bright Medusa by Willa Cather
  2. It looks as though you'd done it with a monkey- wrench – Just Patty by Jean Webster
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