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Definitions of wrest

  1. obtain by seizing forcibly or violently, also metaphorically; "wrest the knife from his hands"; "wrest a meaning from the old text"; "wrest power from the old government" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. To turn; to twist; esp., to twist or extort by violence; to pull of force away by, or as if by, violent wringing or twisting. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To turn from truth; to twist from its natural or proper use or meaning by violence; to pervert; to distort. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To tune with a wrest, or key. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. The act of wresting; a wrench; a violent twist; hence, distortion; perversion. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Active or moving power. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. A key to tune a stringed instrument of music. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A partition in a water wheel, by which the form of the buckets is determined. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To twist, wrench, or force by violence; as, they wrested victory from defeat; to turn from its natural meaning; pervert. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. Twist; violence; the act of taking by force. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. To twist from by force: to twist from truth or from its natural meaning. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  12. Violent pulling and twisting: distortion. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. WRESTER. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. To twist; force by twisting; distort. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  15. To twist; wrench; turn from the true meaning, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. An act of wresting. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. A key for tuning a stringed instrument. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. Distortion; violent pulling and twisting; perversion; an instrument to tune musical instruments with. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  19. To twist or extort by violence; to force from by violence, properly by violent wringing or twisting; to distort; to turn from truth, or twist from its natural meaning; to pervert. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  20. To twist or extort by violence; to force from by violent twisting; to distort; to turn from its natural meaning. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  21. Distortion; violent pulling and twisting. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  22. rest, v.t, to twist from by force: to twist from truth or from its natural meaning.--n. violent pulling and twisting: distortion: an instrument, like a wrench, for tuning the piano, &c.--n. WREST'ER. [A.S. wr['æ]stan--wr['æ]st, firm, from wráth, pa.t. of wríthan, to writhe; Dan. vriste.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  23. Twist, deflect, distort, pervert, (wrests the law to suit himself; w. the facts, sense or words of a passage, &c.); force or wrench away from persons grasp (wrested his sword from him); (n.) key for tuning harp &c.; w.-block, part of piano holding w.-pins, to which strings are attached. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  24. n. Violent pulling and twisting; distortion; perversion;-a key or hammer used in tuning a stringed instrument. Cabinet Dictionary

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