Spellcheck.net

Definitions of wring

  1. twist and press out of shape Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a twisting squeeze; "gave the wet cloth a wring" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. twist and compress, as if in pain or anguish; "Wring one's hand" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. twist, squeeze, or compress in order to extract liquid; "wring the towels" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. obtain by coercion or intimidation; "They extorted money from the executive by threatening to reveal his past to the company boss"; "They squeezed money from the owner of the business by threatening him" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. To wrest from an unwilling person by physical force, menace, duress, torture, or any undue or illegal exercise of power or ingenuity; to wrench away (from); to tear away; to wring (from); to exact; as, to extort contributions from the vanquished; to extort confessions of guilt; to extort a promise; to extort payment of a debt. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To twist and compress; to turn and strain with violence; to writhe; to squeeze hard; to pinch; as, to wring clothes in washing. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. Hence, to pain; to distress; to torment; to torture. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To distort; to pervert; to wrest. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To subject to extortion; to afflict, or oppress, in order to enforce compliance. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To bend or strain out of its position; as, to wring a mast. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To writhe; to twist, as with anguish. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  13. A writhing, as in anguish; a twisting; a griping. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To extract or obtain by twisting and compressing; to squeeze or press (out); hence, to extort; to draw forth by violence, or against resistance or repugnance; - usually with out or form. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To twist; to turn and strain; compress; as, to wring clothes in washing; to extort or get by force; as, to wring a confession from a criminal; to give pain to as if by twisting; as, her sad story wrings my heart. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. Wrung. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. Wringing. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. To twist: to force by twisting: to force or compress: to pain: to extort: to bend out of its position. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  19. To writhe: to twist:-pa.t. and pa.p. wrung, (B.) wringed. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. To twist; force by twisting; compress; pain; extort. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  21. To compress or squeeze out by twisting; to extort; torture. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. Wringer. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. Action of anguish. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. To twist; to turn and strain; to squeeze; to press; to force by twisting; to writhe; to distress; to press with pain; to distort; to pervert; to persecute with extortion; to bend or strain out of its position. To wring off, to force off or separate by wringing. To wring out, to force out; to squeeze out by twisting; to free from water by wringing. To wring from, to force from by violence; to extort. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. To turn and strain forcibly; to force by twisting; to squeeze; to harass; to press with extreme pain; to distort; to persecute with extortion; to bend or strain out of its usual position. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  26. A forcible twist. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. To extract or obtain by twisting and compressing; to squeeze or press out; hence, to extort; to draw forth by violence, or against resistance or repugnance; -- usually with out or form. mso.anu.edu.au
  28. To extract or obtain by twisting and compressing; to squeeze or press (out); hence, to extort; to draw forth by violence, or against resistance or repugnance; usually with out or form. dictgcide_fs
  29. ring, v.t. to twist: to force, or force out, by twisting: to force or compress: to pain: to extort: to bend out of its position.--v.i. to writhe: to twist:--pa.t. and pa.p. wrung, (B.) wringed.--ns. WRING'-BOLT, a bolt with a ring or eye, used to secure a ship's planks against the frame till they are permanently fixed in place; WRING'ER, one who wrings: a machine for forcing water from wet clothes--also WRING'ING-MACHINE'.--adj. WRING'ING-WET, so wet that water can be wrung out.--n.pl. WRING'-STAVES, strong pieces of wood used in applying wring-bolts.--WRING FROM, to extort; WRING OFF, to force off by wringing; WRING OUT, to squeeze out by twisting; WRING THE HANDS, to manifest grief by convulsive clasping of the hands. [A.S. wringan, to twist; Dut. wringen, Ger. ringen. Cf. Wreak, Wry.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  30. (wrung), & n. Squeeze, squeeze& twist, twist forcibly, break by twisting, pervert sense of, torture, (w. persons hand, press it with emotion; w. one\'s hands, squeeze them together in sign of great distress; w. out or w. clothes, press water from them by twisting; wringing wet, so wet as to need wringing; w. neck of, kill chicken &c.; has wrung the words from their true meaning; soul was wrung with agony); extract by squeezing, get out by pressure or importunity, extort, (w. water, groan, consent, money, from or out of or out); hence (-)wringer (2) n. (N.) squeeze (gave my hand, give those clothes, a w.). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary

What are the misspellings for wring?

X