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Definitions of zinc

  1. a bluish-white lustrous metallic element; brittle at ordinary temperatures but malleable when heated; used in a wide variety of alloys and in galvanizing iron; it occurs as zinc sulphide in zinc blende Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. An abundant element of the magnesium-cadmium group, extracted principally from the minerals zinc blende, smithsonite, calamine, and franklinite, as an easily fusible bluish white metal, which is malleable, especially when heated. It is not easily oxidized in moist air, and hence is used for sheeting, coating galvanized iron, etc. It is used in making brass, britannia, and other alloys, and is also largely consumed in electric batteries. Symbol Zn. Atomic weight 64.9. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To coat with zinc; to galvanize. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. A metallic trace element that has the atomic symbol Zn, atomic number 30, and atomic weight 65.38. It is necessary in the diet, forms an essential part of many enzymes, and plays an important role in protein synthesis and in cell division. Zinc deficiency is associated with anemia, short stature, hypogonadism, impaired wound healing, and geophagia. (From Dorland, 27th ed) Medical Dictionary DB
  5. A bluish-white metal, which can stand exposure to air and moisture. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  6. To coat or cover with such metal. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7. Zincky, zinky, zincous. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. A metallic element, symbol Zn, atomic weight 65.37, bluish white in color, malleable and ductile. A number of salts of zinc are used in medicine. Crude commercial zinc is called spelter. For the official salts of zinc, see under zincum. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  9. One of the metals. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  10. A bluish-white metal, somewhat like tin. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. A bluish-white metal. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. A metal of a brilliant white colour, with a shade of blue, somewhat like tin. Sulphate of zinc, the most abundant of the zinc ores, found efflorescent in the form of stalactites. Flowers of zinc, the oxide of zinc which ascends, when the vessel is heated, in the form of white flowers; sometimes called philosophical wool. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  13. A light metal of a bluish white colour, harder than lead, and much used as a substitute for it in the arts, in architecture, &c., in the form of plates, rolled sheets, and leaves; alloyed with copper it forms the well-known compound brass; spelter. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  14. To coat or cover with zinc. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  15. An abundant element of the magnesium-cadmium group, extracted principally from the minerals zinc blende, smithsonite, calamine, and franklinite, as an easily fusible bluish white metal, which is malleable, especially when heated. It is not easily oxidized in moist air, and hence is used for sheeting, coating galvanized iron, etc. It is used in making brass, britannia, and other alloys, and is also largely consumed in electric batteries. Symbol Zn. Atomic number 30. Atomic weight 65.38. dictgcide_fs
  16. zingk, n. a bluish-white metal, breaking with a crystalline fracture--when chemically pure it is malleable and ductile at ordinary temperature, but ordinary zinc is so only at temperatures above 212° Fahr.--v.t. to cover with zinc.--ns. ZINC'-AM'YL, a colourless transparent liquid, composed of zinc and amyl; ZINC'-BLENDE, sphalerite, native sulphide of zinc; ZINC'-BLOOM, hydrozincite; ZINC-COL'IC, a colic caused by the slow poison of zinc-oxide; ZINC'-[=E]'THYL, a colourless volatile liquid, composed of zinc and the radical ethyl.--adjs. ZINCIF'EROUS, ZINKIF'EROUS, containing or producing zinc.--ns. ZINC'ITE, a native oxide of zinc, brittle, translucent, deep red; ZINCKIFIC[=A]'TION, ZINKIFIC[=A]'TION, the process of coating or impregnating an object with zinc.--vs.t. ZINCK'IFY, ZINK'IFY, to cover or impregnate with zinc.--adjs. ZINCK'Y, ZINK'Y, pertaining to zinc: looking like zinc.--n. ZINC'-METH'YL, a mobile stinking liquid, spontaneously inflammable, resembling zinc-ethyl.--adj. ZINC'OID, like zinc.--ns. ZINCOL'YSIS, a mode of decomposition caused by an electric current; ZINC'OLYTE, a body decomposable by electricity; ZINC'OTYPE, a zincograph.--adj. ZINC'OUS, pertaining to zinc.--ns. ZINC'-WHITE, zinc oxide used as a pigment; ZINC'-WORK'ER. [Ger. zink, prob. allied to zinn, tin.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  17. A white metal much used in the arts esp. as component of brass& German silver, as roofing material, as coating for sheet iron (cf. GALVANIZE), in electric batteries, & in relief-printing blocks (flowers of z. or z. oxide, powder used as white pigment& in kinds of ointment& cement); hence (spelt, before -i-, with -c- or -k- or -ck-) zincic, zinciferous, zincoid, aa., zincify v.t., zincification n., zincous (esp. of negative pole of voltaic battery), zinky, aa., zinco- comb. form. (Vb; -c-, -ck-, or -k-), coat with z. [German] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  18. A blue-white metal, many of whose salts are medicinal and poisonous; symbol Zn. American pocket medical dictionary.
  19. A hard, bluish white metal, malleable and ductile at a temperature of 100 to 1500 C., but brittle when heated above 2000 C. Symbol, Zn; atomic weight, 65.4; sp. gr., 6.9. List of poisons and their antidotes. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  20. n. [German] A metal of a brilliant white colour, with a shade of blue; spelter. It is not brittle, but less malleable than copper, lead; or tin, and is largely employed in the manufacture of brass and other alloys. Cabinet Dictionary

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