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Definitions of zinc

  1. To coat with zinc; to galvanize. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To coat or cover with such metal. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. To coat or cover with zinc. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  4. a bluish-white lustrous metallic element; brittle at ordinary temperatures but malleable when heated; used in a wide variety of alloys and in galvanizing iron; it occurs as zinc sulphide in zinc blende Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. A bluish-white metal, somewhat like tin. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  6. A bluish-white metal. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7. A metal of a brilliant white colour, with a shade of blue, somewhat like tin. Sulphate of zinc, the most abundant of the zinc ores, found efflorescent in the form of stalactites. Flowers of zinc, the oxide of zinc which ascends, when the vessel is heated, in the form of white flowers; sometimes called philosophical wool. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  8. A light metal of a bluish white colour, harder than lead, and much used as a substitute for it in the arts, in architecture, &c., in the form of plates, rolled sheets, and leaves; alloyed with copper it forms the well-known compound brass; spelter. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  9. Zincky, zinky, zincous. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

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Usage examples for zinc

  1. Utterly unable to proceed further, he crawled to the nearest zinc roofed shack, and, fully prepared to surrender, knocked at the door. – Real Soldiers of Fortune by Richard Harding Davis
  2. Of lead, copper, zinc and tin, we require a steady supply for use in the various arts; and the statement has been made that the supply of each one of these is in the hands of a trust. – Monopolies and the People by Charles Whiting Baker
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