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Correct spelling for 837I

We think the word 837i is a misspelling. It could be just an incorrect spelling of the words which are suggested below. Review the list and pick the word which you think is the most suitable. For your convenience, we put a usage example below each word

Possible correct spellings for 837i

  • Ir(Definition of ir)
  • The lithuania mens national under-16 and under-17 basketball team (lithuanian: lietuvos nacionalinė vaikinų jaunučių iki 16 ir jaunių iki 17 krepšinio rinktinė), is the representative for lithuania in international basketball competitions, and it is organized and run by the lithuanian basketball federation.

  • Ci
  • Some of the ci-devant "communicants" call robert owen a fool, whilst others brand him with still more opprobrious epithets: and i never could get two of them to agree as to the primary causes of the failure of that community.

  • Vi
  • "they won't ever a doll be as nice as she was," sobbed vi.

  • Li(Definition of li)
  • After a while the wet land in south car-o-li-na was turned to rice fields.

  • Ia
  • 13 ia. 18 mo. 16 kan. 5 neb. 6 s. d. 2 mont.

  • Si(Definition of si)
  • "si, is pretty," said mrs. polk, with a pensive sigh.

  • Ni
  • 11. i e -ni formed abstracts and nouns of agency.

  • Bi(Definition of bi)
  • Verely this lucre ought not to be set light bi.

  • Ie
  • The commission has the statutory power to refer cases dealt with on indictment (ie solemn procedure cases) to the high court of justiciary.

  • Mi(Definition of mi)
  • Quiere mi vestido nuevo.

  • In(Definition of in)
  • I knew we were not mistaken in you.

  • Gi
  • Gi devas nur servi por la rilatoj internaciaj kaj por tiuj verkoj au produktoj, kiuj interesas egale la tutan mondon.

  • Io(Definition of io)
  • The phoenician mariners who fled from the red sea, being used to long voyages for the sake of traffic, begin the like voyages on the mediterranean from zidon; and sailing as far as greece, carry away io the daughter of inachus, who with other grecian women came to their ships to buy their merchandize.

  • Ri
  • That is how i came, as bibi-ri always said, to be scraping throats instead of cutting them.

  • Iv
  • The account in iv.

  • Old-Fashioned(Definition of old-fashioned)
  • Well, i suppose i am old-fashioned, but it seems to me quite ridiculous.

  • It(Definition of It)
  • Up and at it!"

  • Pi(Definition of pi)
  • "good? do you mean 'pi'? he's not that, thank the lord!"

  • Ti(Definition of ti)
  • Chorus: h'a-ti-ra, h'a-ti-ra, h'a-ti-ra, a-ti-ra, h'a-ti-ra, a-ti-ra, h'a-ti-ra, a-ti-ra, a-ti-ra, h'a-ti-ra, a-ti-ra.

  • Il(Definition of il)
  • I have often amused myself in conversing with our new generals and new officers; there is such a curious mixture of ignorance and information, of credulity and disbelief, of real boasting and affected modesty, in everything they say or do in company; their manners are far from being elegant, but also very distant from vulgarity; they do not resemble those of what we formerly called 'gens comme il faut', and 'la bonne societe'!

  • Xi(Definition of xi)
  • The words of 1 corinthians xi.

  • Id
  • Ye may guess i didn't go into the room, and i used to be shiverin' in my bed wi' fear, at her skirlin' and scrafflin' on the flure, and blarin' out words that id make your skin turn blue.

  • I'm(Definition of I'm)
  • "i'm tryin' to, sir.

  • Ii
  • 32, 61, 125, 153, 442, 468, 473-475; ii.

  • U(Definition of U)
  • After a power struggle within the u.n.i.a., eason, who had led the fight, was murdered in new orleans.

  • I'd(Definition of i'd)
  • I wish i'd looked.

  • Hi(Definition of hi)
  • "hi, there," he yelled mightily.

  • Wi
  • "eh, for sure, an' dud yo see o' that at owdham? laacks, but it mon ha' been grand! aw wish aw'd bin wi' yo'!"

  • If(Definition of If)
  • "oh, if i could!

  • Oi
  • "oi, weh is mir! how the night drags!" sighs breklin, and turns over onto his other side.

  • Ai(Definition of ai)
  • The sing-song girl, her fiddle broken, was beating her forehead upon the floor and wailing: ai, ai! ai, ai! spurlock-or taber, as he called himself-sat slumped in a chair, staring with glazed eyes at nothing, absolutely uninterested in the confusion for which he was primarily accountable.

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