Spellcheck.net

Correct spelling for PROPPTLY

We think the word propptly is a misspelling. It could be just an incorrect spelling of the words which are suggested below. Review the list and pick the word which you think is the most suitable. For your convenience, we put a usage example below each word

Possible correct spellings for propptly

  • Priestly
  • Nor shall a brilliant audience be lacking, for my complimentary visitors with their priestly splendor and array of arms will, it is to be hoped, arrive punctually.

  • Prettily
  • Then we passed a village, the thatched cottages with their white gables rising prettily from the blossoming orchards.

  • Proudly
  • So proudly, as if he had disdain'd the ground rich.

  • Propelled
  • He had thought over all he meant to say; he had planned several eloquent and rounded sentences, some of which he murmured placidly to himself as he propelled his slow boat along.

  • Corruptly
  • 39. wel is supplied from the sion ms.; nearly all the copies give this line corruptly; see note.

  • Property
  • "she appeared to expect the bulk of the property.

  • Propped
  • In front of her was a book, propped up against the rim of a tin candlestick shaped like a small basin.

  • Promptly
  • "oh, yes, i've been thinking of it," i promptly answered.

  • Raptly
  • Properly
  • It showed the people that resistance did not necessarily lead to calamity, that the risk was greater in surrender than in defiance, and, above all, that in their dykes they possessed means of defence that, if properly used, would fight for them even more effectually than they could do for themselves.

  • Propel
  • If you practice throwing over a smooth wide part of the river, you will see how your line falls on the water, whether thrown in a lump, or light and straight without a splash; but at one time you may cast the line right out over the stream at its full length, and on giving another cast you may allow the line to fall on the water in the middle of it first, and the fly to fall last, which is not so good, but in either way the fish will rise and take it; by the last cast you may get the line farther off, and the fly alighting near the opposite bank, it is very apt to be taken by a fish lying close under it; and when throwing, keep the point of the rod up out of the water, and do not let it strike it; throw across in a rather slanting direction, allowing the fly to sweep down without a curve in the middle of the line, and at the same time move the rod playfully to give the fly a life-like appearance; drawing it in towards your side of the bank, moving it up and down gradually with the current, and when a fish takes the fly raise your hand, and fasten the hook without a jerk, holding up your rod at the same time with what is termed a "sweet fast," that it may not get slack at any time till you have killed him; when you poise the rod in your hands for a throw, the whole knack is in keeping the left hand steady, and with a turn of the right hand cause the line to make a circle round the left shoulder and over the head, propel it forward with the spring of the rod, keeping the fly going all the time till it falls on the water before you as straight as possible; when you lift the fly out of the water to throw again, you require to make use of the strength of the right arm, giving it the proper turn round with the wrist, making a sweep of the extent of the line behind you, and with the spring and power of the rod direct the fly on that part of the stream where you desire it should fall; letting the line out occasionally off the reel with your hand, which gives the fly a very natural motion on the water, moving it gradually down towards your side, when you lift the line out and make another throw as before a little lower down, and so on until you cover the whole stream.

X