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Correct spelling for WHOUT

We think the word whout is a misspelling. It could be just an incorrect spelling of the words which are suggested below. Review the list and pick the word which you think is the most suitable. For your convenience, we put a definition below each word.

Possible correct spellings for whout

  • Bout
  • An occasion for excessive eating or drinking; "they went on a bust that lasted three days".

  • Gout
  • A painful inflammation of the big toe and foot caused by defects in uric acid metabolism resulting in deposits of the acid and its salts in the blood and joints.

  • Hoot
  • A cry or noise made to express displeasure or contempt.

  • Hot
  • Very fast; "a blistering pace"; "got off to a hot start"; "in hot pursuit"; "a red-hot line drive".

  • Hut
  • Temporary military shelter.

  • Lout
  • An awkward stupid person.

  • Out
  • From one's possession; "he gave out money to the poor"; "gave away the tickets".

  • Pout
  • Catfish common in eastern united states.

  • Rout
  • Make a groove in, or provide with a groove, as of a record, for example.

  • Shot
  • An aggressive remark directed at a person like a missile and intended to have a telling effect; "his parting shot was `drop dead'"; "she threw shafts of sarcasm"; "she takes a dig at me every chance she gets".

  • Shout
  • Use foul or abusive language towards; "the actress abused the policeman who gave her a parking ticket"; "the angry mother shouted at the teacher".

  • Shut
  • Not open; "the door slammed shut".

  • Tout
  • Show off.

  • Wait
  • Look forward to the probable occurrence of; "we were expecting a visit from our relatives"; "she is looking to a promotion"; "he is waiting to be drafted".

  • Wart
  • (pathology) a firm abnormal elevated blemish on the skin; caused by a virus.

  • Washout
  • (informal) someone who is unsuccessful.

  • Watt
  • Scottish engineer and inventor whose improvements in the steam engine led to its wide use in industry (1736-1819).

  • Wet
  • (slang) very drunk.

  • Wheat
  • Annual or biennial grass having erect flower spikes and light brown grains.

  • Whet
  • Make keen or more acute; "whet my appetite".

  • Whist
  • A card game for four players who form two partnerships; a pack of 52 cards is dealt and each side scores one point for each trick it takes in excess of six.

  • Whit
  • A tiny or scarcely detectable amount.

  • White
  • Being of the achromatic color of maximum lightness; having little or no hue owing to reflection of almost all incident light; "as white as fresh snow"; "a bride's white dress".

  • Who
  • A united nations agency to coordinate international health activities and to help governments improve health services.

  • Whop
  • To strike heavily; to beat; to crush..

  • Wit
  • Mental ability; "he's got plenty of brains but no common sense".

  • Woad
  • A blue dyestuff obtained from the woad plant.

  • Wont
  • A pattern of behavior acquired through frequent repetition; "she had a habit twirling the ends of her hair"; "long use had hardened him to it".

  • Wood
  • English writer of novels about murders and thefts and forgeries (1814-1887).

  • Word
  • Put into words or an expression; "he formulated his concerns to the board of trustees".

  • Wort
  • Usually used in combination: `liverwort'; `milkwort'; `whorlywort'.

  • Wot
  • Of wit.

  • What
  • As an interrogative pronoun, used in asking questions regarding either persons or things; as, what is this? what did you say? what poem is this? what child is lost?.

  • Whoa
  • Stop; stand; hold. see ho, 2..

  • Whom
  • The objective case of who. see who..

  • Without
  • On or at the outside of; out of; not within; as, without doors..

  • Won't
  • A colloquial contraction of woll not. will not. see will..

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