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Definitions of appeal

  1. challenge (a decision); "She appealed the verdict" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. (law) a legal proceeding in which the appellant resorts to a higher court for the purpose of obtaining a review of a lower court decision and a reversal of the lower court's judgment or the granting of a new trial; "their appeal was denied in the superior court" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  3. attractiveness that interests or pleases or stimulates; "his smile was part of his appeal to her" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. request for a sum of money; "an appeal to raise money for starving children" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. earnest or urgent request; "an entreaty to stop the fighting"; "an appeal for help"; "an appeal to the public to keep calm" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. request earnestly (something from somebody); ask for aid or protection; "appeal to somebody for help"; "Invoke God in times of trouble" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. cite as an authority; resort to; "He invoked the law that would save him"; "I appealed to the law of 1900"; "She invoked an ancient law" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. be attractive to; "The idea of a vacation appeals to me"; "The beautiful garden attracted many people" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. take a court case to a higher court for review; "He was found guilty but appealed immediately" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. To make application for the removal of (a cause) from an inferior to a superior judge or court for a rehearing or review on account of alleged injustice or illegality in the trial below. We say, the cause was appealed from an inferior court. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To charge with a crime; to accuse; to institute a private criminal prosecution against for some heinous crime; as, to appeal a person of felony. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To summon; to challenge. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To invoke. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To apply for the removal of a cause from an inferior to a superior judge or court for the purpose of reexamination of for decision. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To call upon another to decide a question controverted, to corroborate a statement, to vindicate one's rights, etc.; as, I appeal to all mankind for the truth of what is alleged. Hence: To call on one for aid; to make earnest request. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. An application for the removal of a cause or suit from an inferior to a superior judge or court for reexamination or review. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. The mode of proceeding by which such removal is effected. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. The right of appeal. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. An accusation; a process which formerly might be instituted by one private person against another for some heinous crime demanding punishment for the particular injury suffered, rather than for the offense against the public. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. An accusation of a felon at common law by one of his accomplices, which accomplice was then called an approver. See Approvement. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A summons to answer to a charge. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. A call upon a person or an authority for proof or decision, in one's favor; reference to another as witness; a call for help or a favor; entreaty. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Resort to physical means; recourse. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Appealable. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. A written request to a higher court to modify or reverse the judgment of a trial court or intermediate level appellate court. Normally, an appellate court accepts as true all the facts that the trial judge or jury found to be true, and decides only whether the judge made mistakes in understanding and applying the law. If the appellate court decides that a mistake was made that changed the outcome, it will direct the lower court to conduct a new trial, but often the mistakes are deemed "harmless" and the judgment is left alone. Some mistakes are corrected by the appellate court -- such as a miscalculation of money damages -- without sending the case back to the trial court. An appeal begins when the loser at trial -- or in an intermediate level appellate court -- files a notice of appeal, which must be done within strict time limits (often 30 days from the date of judgment). The loser (called the appellant) and the winner (called the appellee) submit written arguments (called briefs) and often make oral arguments explaining why the lower court's decision should be upheld or overturned.
  26. To transfer or refer to a superior court or judge; as, to appeal a case. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. To refer to another person or tribunal; entreat, call for, or invoke aid, sympathy, or mercy. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. A call or invocation for aid or sympathy; the right of referring a judicial decision to a higher court; a call or reference to another for proof. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. Appealing. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. Appealingly. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. To call upon, have recourse to: to refer (to a witness or superior authority). The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. To remove a cause (to another court). The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  33. Act of appealing. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  34. Act of appealing; the cause appealed. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  35. To address; to call upon; to refer to. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  36. To remove a cause to a higher court. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  37. To beseech; entreat; awaken response or sympathy; followed by to. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. To take (a cause) to a higher court. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. An earnest request; entreaty. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. A resort to a higher authority, as for sanction or aid. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. The act of appealing; the right of appeal; a summons to answer a charge; a reference to another; recourse. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. To remove a cause from an inferior to a superior court. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  43. To refer to a superior judge or court; to refer to another as witness; to invoke aid, pity, or mercy; to have recourse to. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  44. To apply for justice; to refer a disputed matter to another, as to a higher judge or court, or to a superior. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  45. The removing of a cause from a lower to a higher court; a reference to another; an address to the judgment or feelings of an audience; an application for justice. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  46. The principle, of appeal was recognized by the Mosaic law in the establishment of a central court under the presidency of the judge or ruler for the time being, before which all cased too difficult for the local court were to be tried. ( deuteronomy 17:8 deuteronomy 17:9 ) According to the above regulation, the appeal lay in the time of the Judges to the judge, ( Judges 4:5 ) and under the monarchy to the king. Jehoshaphat delegated his judicial authority to a court permanently established for the purpose. ( 2 Chronicles 19:8 ) These courts were re-established by Ezra. ( Ezra 7:25 ) After the institution of the Sanhedrin the final appeal lay to them. St. Paul, as a Roman citizen, exercized a right of appeal from the jurisdiction of the local court at Jerusalem to the emperor. ( Acts 25:11 ) biblestudytools.com
  47. a reference of any case from an inferior to a superior court. Moses established in the wilderness a series of judicatories such that appeals could be made from a lower to a higher ( Exodus 18:13-26 .) Under the Roman law the most remarkable case of appeal is that of Paul from the tribunal of Festus at Caesarea to that of the emperor at Rome ( Acts 25:11 Acts 25:12 Acts 25:21 Acts 25:25 ). Paul availed himself of the privilege of a Roman citizen in this matter. biblestudytools.com
  48. In civil practice. The complaint to a superior court of an injustice done or error committed by an inferior one, whose judgment or decision the court above is called upon to correct or reverse. The removal of a cause from a court of inferior to one of superior jurisdiction, for the purpose of obtaining a review and retrial. Wiscart v. Dauchy, 3 Dall. 321, 1 L. Ed. 019. The distinction between an appeal and a writ of error is that an appeal is a process of civil law origin, and removes a cause entirely, subjecting the facts, as well as the law, to a review and revisal; but a writ of error is of common law origin, and it removes nothing for re-examination but the law. Wiscart v. Dauchy. 3 Dall. 321, 1 L. Ed. G19; U. S. v. Goodwin, 7 Cranch, 108, 3 L. Ed. 284; Cunningham v. Neagle, 135 U. S. 1, 10 Sup. Ct. 058. 34 L. Ed. 55. But appeal is sometimes used to denote the nature of appellate jurisdiction, as distinguished from original jurisdiction, without any particular regard to the mode by which a cause is transmitted to a superior jurisdiction. U. S. v. Wonson, 1 Gal. 0, 12. Fed. Cas. No. 10,750. In criminal practice. A formal accusation made by one private person against another of having committed some heinous crime. 4 Bl. Comm. 312. Appeal was also the name given to the proceeding in English law where a person, indicted of treason or felony, and arraigned for the same, confessed the fact before plea pleaded, and appealed, or accused others, his accomplices in the same crime, in order to obtain his pardon. In this case he was called an “approver” or “prover,” and the party appealed or accused, the “appellee.” 4 Bl. Comm. 330. In legislation. The act by which a member of a legislative body who questions the correctness of a decision of the presiding officer, or “chair,” procures a vote of the body upon the decision. In old French law. A mode of proceeding in the lords’ courts, where a party was dissatisfied with the judgment of the peers, which was by accusing them of having given a false or malicious judgment, and offering to make good the charge by the duel or combat. This was called the “appeal of false judgment.” Montesq. Esprit des Lois, liv. 28, c. 27. thelawdictionary.org
  49. English crim. law. The accusation of a person, in a legal form, for a crime committed by him; or, it is the lawful declaration of another man's crime, before a competent judge, by one who sets his name to the declaration, and undertakes to prove it, upon the penalty which may ensue thereon. Vide Co. Litt. 123 b, 287 b; 6 Burr. R. 2643, 2793; 2 W. Bl. R. 713; 1 B. & A. 405. Appeals of murder, as well as of treason, felony, or other offences, together with wager of battle, are abolished by stat. 59 Geo. M. c. 46. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  50. Practice. The act by which a party submits to the decision of a superior court, a cause which has been tried in an inferior tribunal. 1 S. & R. 78 Bin. 219; 3 Bin. 48. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  51. The appeal generally annuls the judgment of the inferior court, so far that no action can be taken upon it until after the final decision of the cause. Its object is to review the whole case, and to secure a just judgment upon the merits. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  52. An appeal differs from proceedings in error, under which the errors committed in the proceedings are examined, and if any have been committed the first judgment is reversed; because in the appeal the whole case is exainined and tried as if it had not been tried before. Vide Dane's Ab. h. t.; Serg. Const. Law Index, h. t. and article Courts of the United States. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  53. To apply for the removal of a cause from an inferior to a superior judge or court for the purpose of re Tomlins. dictgcide_fs
  54. An application for the removal of a cause or suit from an inferior to a superior judge or court for re (b) The mode of proceeding by which such removal is effected. (c) The right of appeal. (d) An accusation; a process which formerly might be instituted by one private person against another for some heinous crime demanding punishment for the particular injury suffered, rather than for the offense against the public. (e) An accusation of a felon at common law by one of his accomplices, which accomplice was then called an approver. See Approvement. Tomlins. Bouvier. dictgcide_fs
  55. ap-p[=e]l', v.i. to call upon, have recourse to (with to): to refer (to a witness or superior authority): make supplication or earnest request to a person for a thing: to resort for verification or proof to some principle or person.--v.t. to remove a cause (to another court).--n. act of appealing: a supplication: removal of a cause to a higher tribunal.--adjs. APPEAL'ABLE; APPEAL'ING, relating to appeals.--adv. APPEAL'INGLY.--n. APPEAL'INGNESS. [O. Fr. apeler--appell[=a]re, -[=a]tum, to address, call by name; also to appeal to, impeach.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  56. Call to (higher tribunal) for deliverance from decision of lower (also abs.); a. to the country (i.e. from parliament), dissolve parliament; call to (witness) for corroboration; call attention to (evidence); make earnest request (to person, for thing or to do); pictures a. (address themselves) to the eye, do not a. (prove attractive) to me. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  57. Act of appealing; right of appealing; Court of A. (hearing cases previously tried in inferior courts). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  58. n. Removal of a suit from an inferior to a superior court:—the mode by which such removal is effected:—the right of appeal;—a summons to answer to a charge ;—a call upon a person for proof or decision, or to grant a favour;—resort; recourse; as, an appeal to arms. Cabinet Dictionary
  59. A removal of a cause from an inferior to a superior court; in the common law, an accusation; a call upon any as witness. Complete Dictionary

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