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Definitions of bailiff

  1. an officer of the court who is employed to execute writs and processes and make arrests etc. Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. A sheriff's deputy, appointed to make arrests, collect fines, summon juries, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. An overseer or under steward of an estate, who directs husbandry operations, collects rents, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. A court official usually classified as a peace officer (sometimes as a deputy sheriff, or marshal) and usually wearing a uniform. A bailiff's main job is to maintain order in the courtroom. In addition, bailiffs often help court proceedings go smoothly by shepherding witnesses in and out of the courtroom and handing evidence to witnesses as they testify. In criminal cases, the bailiff may have temporary charge of any defendant who is in custody during court proceedings.
  5. Originally, a person put in charge of something especially, a chief officer, magistrate, or keeper, as of a county, town, hundred, or castle; one to whom power of custody or care are intrusted. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. A sheriff's officer or constable; an overseer. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7. A sheriff's officer: an agent or land-steward. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  8. A sheriffs officer; an agent or steward. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  9. An officer of the sheriff who serves writs. &c, and executes arrests; a land steward. A water bailiff, an officer to guard rivers from poachers. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  10. An officer of justice; an agent or steward over land. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  11. In a general sense, a person to whom some authority, care, guardianship, or jurisdiction is delivered, committed, or intrusted; one who is deputed or appointed to take charge of another's affairs; an overseer or superintendent; a keeper, protector, or guardian; a steward. Spelman. A sheriff's officer or deputy. 1 Bl. Comm. 344. A magistrate, who formerly administered Justice in the parliaments or courts of France, answering to the English sheriffs as mentioned by Bracton. In the action of account render. A person who has by delivery the custody and administration of lands or goods for the benefit of the owner or bailor, and is liable to render an account thereof. Co. Litt. 271; Story, Eq. Jur. f 446; West v. Weyer, 40 Ohio St. 66, 18 N. E. 537, 15 Am. St. Rep. 552. A bailiff is defined to be "a servant that has the administration and charge of lands, goods, and chattels, to make the best benefit for the owner, against whom an action of account lies, for the profits which he has raised or made, or might by his industry or care have raised or made." Barnum v. Landon, 25 Conn. 149. thelawdictionary.org
  12. Account render. A bailiff is a person who has, by delivery, the custody and administration of lands or goods for the benefit of the owner or bailor, and is liable to render an account thereof. Co. Lit. 271; 2 Leon. 245; 1 Mall . Ent. 65. The word is derived from the old French word bailler, to bail, that is, to deliver. Originally, the word implied the delivery of real estate, as of land, woods, a house, a part of the fish in a pond; Owen, 20; 2 Leon. 194; Keilw. 114 a, b; 37 Ed. III. 7; 10 H. VII. 7, 30; but was afterwards extended to goods and chattels. Every bailiff is a ,receiver, but every receiver is not a bailiff. Hence it is a good plea that the defendant never was receiver, but as bailiff. 18 Ed. III. 16. See Cro. Eliz. 82-3; 2 Anders. 62-3, 96-7 F. N. B. 134 F; 8 Co. 48 a, b. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  13. From a bailiff is required administration, care, management, skill. He is, therefore, entitled to allowance for the expense of administration, and for all things done in his office, according to his own judgment, without the special direction of his principal, and also for casual things done in the common course of business: 1 Mall. Ent. 65, (4) 11; 1 Rolle, Ab. 125, 1, 7; Co. Lit. 89 a; Com. Dig. E 12 Bro. Ab. Acc. 18 Lucas, Rep. 23 but not for things foreign to his office. Bro. Ab. Acc .26, 88; Plowd. 282b, 14; Com. Dig. Acc. E13; Co. Lit. 172; 1 Mall. Ent. 65, (4) 4. Whereas, a mere receiver, or a receiver who is not also a bailiff, is not entitled to allowance for any expenses. Bro. Ab. Acc. 18; 1 Mall. Ent. 66, (4) 10; 1 Roll. Ab. 118; Com. Dig. E 13; 1 Dall. 340. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  14. A bailiff may appear and plead for his principal in an assize; " and his plea com- mences " thus, " J. S., bailiff of T. N., comes " &c., not " T. N., by his bailiff, J. S., comes," &c. 2 Inst. 415; Keilw. 117 b. As to what matters he may plead, see 2 Inst. 414. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  15. Office. Magistrates who for merly administered justice in the parliaments or courts of France, answering to the English sheriffs as mentioned by Bracton. There are still bailiffs of particular towns in England as the bailiff of Dover Castle, &c., otherwise bailiffs are now only officers or stewards, &c. as Bailiffs of liberties, appointed by every lord within his liberty, to serve writs, &c. Bailiff errent or itenerant, appointed to go about the country for the same purpose. Sheriff 's bailies, sheriff's officers to execute writs; these are also called bound bailiffs because they are usually bound in a bond to the sheriff for the due exeecution of their office. Bailiffs of court baron, to summon the court, &c. Bailffs of hushandry, appointed by private persons to collect their rents and manage their estates. Water bailiffs, officers in port towns for searching ships, gathering tolls, &c. Bac. Ab. h. t. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  16. Originally, a person put in charge of something; especially, a chief officer, magistrate, or keeper, as of a county, town, hundred, or castle; one to whom powers of custody or care are intrusted. dictgcide_fs
  17. b[=a]l'if, n. formerly any king's officer, e.g. sheriffs, mayors, &c., but applied specially to the chief officer of a hundred, still the title of the chief magistrate of various towns (e.g. High-bailiff of Westminster, cf. Bailiff of Dover Castle, also the bailly or first civil officer of the Channel Islands: a sheriff's officer: an agent or land-steward.--n. BAIL'IWICK, the jurisdiction of a bailiff. [O. Fr. baillif--Low L. bajulivus--bajalus, carrier, administrator. See BAIL.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  18. (Orig.) King\'s representative in a district (including mayor, sheriff, &c.), esp. chief officer of a hundred (still in High-B. of Westminster, B. of Dover Castle, &c.; used as Eng. equivalent of F bailli, German landvogt, Channel-I. bailly or first civil officer); officer under sheriff for writs, processes, arrests; agent of lord of manor; landholder\'s steward. [middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  19. n. A sheriff's deputy, appointed to make arrests, collect fines, summon juries, &c. Cabinet Dictionary
  20. A subordinate officer; an officer whose business it is to execute arrests; an under-steward of a mannor. Complete Dictionary

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